Levofloxacin Dosage

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Dosage of Levofloxacin in details

infoThe dose of a drug and dosage of the drug are two different terminologies. Dose is defined as the quantity or amount of medicine given by the doctor or taken by the patient at a given period. Dosage is the regimen prescribed by the doctor about how many days and how many times per day the drug is to be taken in specified dose by the patient. The dose is expressed in mg for tablets or gm, micro gm sometimes, ml for syrups or drops for kids syrups. The dose is not fixed for a drug for all conditions, and it changes according to the condition or a disease. It also changes on the age of the patient. Let us see what a dose of Levofloxacin drug for various conditions is.

Usual Adult Dose for Nosocomial Pneumonia:

750 mg orally or IV every 24 hours for 7 to 14 days

Comments:

-Adjunctive therapy recommended as clinically indicated.

-Coadministration with an antipseudomonal beta-lactam recommended if Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a documented/possible pathogen.

-Current guidelines should be consulted for additional information.

Use: For the treatment of nosocomial pneumonia due to methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus, P aeruginosa, Serratia marcescens, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, or Streptococcus pneumoniae

Usual Adult Dose for Pneumonia:

For 7- to 14-day regimen: 500 mg orally or IV every 24 hours for 7 to 14 days

For 5-day regimen: 750 mg orally or IV every 24 hours for 5 days

Comments:

-Multi-drug resistant S pneumoniae (MDRSP) isolates are isolates resistant to at least 2 of the following antibacterials: penicillin (MIC at least 2 mcg/mL), second-generation cephalosporins (e.g., cefuroxime), macrolides, tetracyclines, and sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim.

Use: For the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia:

-For 7- to 14-day regimen: Due to methicillin-susceptible S aureus, S pneumoniae (including MDRSP), H influenzae, H parainfluenzae, K pneumoniae, Moraxella catarrhalis, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, Legionella pneumophila, or Mycoplasma pneumoniae

-For 5-day regimen: Due to S pneumoniae (excluding MDRSP), H influenzae, H parainfluenzae, M pneumoniae, or C pneumoniae

Usual Adult Dose for Skin and Structure Infection:

Complicated infection: 750 mg orally or IV every 24 hours for 7 to 14 days

Uncomplicated infection: 500 mg orally or IV every 24 hours for 7 to 10 days

Uses: For the treatment of complicated skin and skin structure infections due to methicillin-susceptible S aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, S pyogenes, or Proteus mirabilis; for the treatment of mild to moderate uncomplicated skin and skin structure infections (including abscesses, cellulitis, furuncles, impetigo, pyoderma, wound infections) due to methicillin-susceptible S aureus or S pyogenes

Usual Adult Dose for Prostatitis:

500 mg orally or IV every 24 hours for 28 days

Use: For the treatment of chronic bacterial prostatitis due to E coli, E faecalis, or methicillin-susceptible S epidermidis

Usual Adult Dose for Inhalation Bacillus anthracis:

500 mg orally or IV every 24 hours for 60 days

Comments:

-Drug administration should begin as soon as possible after suspected/confirmed exposure to aerosolized Bacillus anthracis.

-Efficacy based on plasma levels reached in humans, a surrogate endpoint reasonably likely to predict clinical benefit; this drug has not been tested in humans for postexposure prevention of inhalation anthrax.

-Safety of this drug has not been established for therapy durations exceeding 28 days; prolonged therapy recommended only when the benefit outweighs the risk.

Use: For inhalational anthrax (postexposure) to reduce incidence/progression of infection after exposure to aerosolized B anthracis

US CDC Recommendations: 750 mg orally or IV every 24 hours

Duration of Therapy:

Postexposure prophylaxis for B anthracis infection: 60 days

Systemic anthrax:

-With possible/confirmed meningitis: At least 2 to 3 weeks or until patient is clinically stable (whichever is longer)

-When meningitis has been excluded: 2 weeks or until patient is clinically stable (whichever is longer)

-Patients exposed to aerosolized spores will require prophylaxis to complete an antimicrobial regimen of 60 days from onset of illness.

Cutaneous anthrax without systemic involvement:

-Bioterrorism-related cases: 60 days

-Naturally-acquired cases: 7 to 10 days

Comments:

-Ciprofloxacin is preferred for pregnant women.

-Recommended as an alternative oral drug for postexposure prophylaxis and as an alternative IV drug for the treatment of systemic anthrax

-Recommended as a preferred oral drug for the treatment of cutaneous anthrax without systemic involvement

-Recommended for all strains (regardless of penicillin susceptibility or if susceptibility is unknown) when used for postexposure prophylaxis, systemic anthrax when meningitis has been excluded, or cutaneous anthrax without systemic involvement

-Recommended for use with a protein synthesis inhibitor when used for systemic anthrax; the addition of a bactericidal beta-lactam is recommended with possible/confirmed meningitis.

-Systemic anthrax includes anthrax meningitis, inhalation anthrax, injection anthrax, gastrointestinal anthrax, and cutaneous anthrax with systemic involvement, extensive edema, or lesions of the head or neck.

-Current guidelines should be consulted for additional information.

Usual Adult Dose for Cutaneous Bacillus anthracis:

500 mg orally or IV every 24 hours for 60 days

Comments:

-Drug administration should begin as soon as possible after suspected/confirmed exposure to aerosolized Bacillus anthracis.

-Efficacy based on plasma levels reached in humans, a surrogate endpoint reasonably likely to predict clinical benefit; this drug has not been tested in humans for postexposure prevention of inhalation anthrax.

-Safety of this drug has not been established for therapy durations exceeding 28 days; prolonged therapy recommended only when the benefit outweighs the risk.

Use: For inhalational anthrax (postexposure) to reduce incidence/progression of infection after exposure to aerosolized B anthracis

US CDC Recommendations: 750 mg orally or IV every 24 hours

Duration of Therapy:

Postexposure prophylaxis for B anthracis infection: 60 days

Systemic anthrax:

-With possible/confirmed meningitis: At least 2 to 3 weeks or until patient is clinically stable (whichever is longer)

-When meningitis has been excluded: 2 weeks or until patient is clinically stable (whichever is longer)

-Patients exposed to aerosolized spores will require prophylaxis to complete an antimicrobial regimen of 60 days from onset of illness.

Cutaneous anthrax without systemic involvement:

-Bioterrorism-related cases: 60 days

-Naturally-acquired cases: 7 to 10 days

Comments:

-Ciprofloxacin is preferred for pregnant women.

-Recommended as an alternative oral drug for postexposure prophylaxis and as an alternative IV drug for the treatment of systemic anthrax

-Recommended as a preferred oral drug for the treatment of cutaneous anthrax without systemic involvement

-Recommended for all strains (regardless of penicillin susceptibility or if susceptibility is unknown) when used for postexposure prophylaxis, systemic anthrax when meningitis has been excluded, or cutaneous anthrax without systemic involvement

-Recommended for use with a protein synthesis inhibitor when used for systemic anthrax; the addition of a bactericidal beta-lactam is recommended with possible/confirmed meningitis.

-Systemic anthrax includes anthrax meningitis, inhalation anthrax, injection anthrax, gastrointestinal anthrax, and cutaneous anthrax with systemic involvement, extensive edema, or lesions of the head or neck.

-Current guidelines should be consulted for additional information.

Usual Adult Dose for Anthrax Prophylaxis:

500 mg orally or IV every 24 hours for 60 days

Comments:

-Drug administration should begin as soon as possible after suspected/confirmed exposure to aerosolized Bacillus anthracis.

-Efficacy based on plasma levels reached in humans, a surrogate endpoint reasonably likely to predict clinical benefit; this drug has not been tested in humans for postexposure prevention of inhalation anthrax.

-Safety of this drug has not been established for therapy durations exceeding 28 days; prolonged therapy recommended only when the benefit outweighs the risk.

Use: For inhalational anthrax (postexposure) to reduce incidence/progression of infection after exposure to aerosolized B anthracis

US CDC Recommendations: 750 mg orally or IV every 24 hours

Duration of Therapy:

Postexposure prophylaxis for B anthracis infection: 60 days

Systemic anthrax:

-With possible/confirmed meningitis: At least 2 to 3 weeks or until patient is clinically stable (whichever is longer)

-When meningitis has been excluded: 2 weeks or until patient is clinically stable (whichever is longer)

-Patients exposed to aerosolized spores will require prophylaxis to complete an antimicrobial regimen of 60 days from onset of illness.

Cutaneous anthrax without systemic involvement:

-Bioterrorism-related cases: 60 days

-Naturally-acquired cases: 7 to 10 days

Comments:

-Ciprofloxacin is preferred for pregnant women.

-Recommended as an alternative oral drug for postexposure prophylaxis and as an alternative IV drug for the treatment of systemic anthrax

-Recommended as a preferred oral drug for the treatment of cutaneous anthrax without systemic involvement

-Recommended for all strains (regardless of penicillin susceptibility or if susceptibility is unknown) when used for postexposure prophylaxis, systemic anthrax when meningitis has been excluded, or cutaneous anthrax without systemic involvement

-Recommended for use with a protein synthesis inhibitor when used for systemic anthrax; the addition of a bactericidal beta-lactam is recommended with possible/confirmed meningitis.

-Systemic anthrax includes anthrax meningitis, inhalation anthrax, injection anthrax, gastrointestinal anthrax, and cutaneous anthrax with systemic involvement, extensive edema, or lesions of the head or neck.

-Current guidelines should be consulted for additional information.

Usual Adult Dose for Plague:

500 mg orally or IV every 24 hours for 10 to 14 days

Comments:

-Drug administration should begin as soon as possible after suspected/confirmed exposure to Yersinia pestis.

-Higher doses (750 mg orally or IV every 24 hours) can be used for treatment of plague if clinically indicated.

-Efficacy studies not conducted in humans with plague for ethical and feasibility reasons; approval based on efficacy study in animals.

Uses: For treatment of plague (including pneumonic and septicemic plague) due to Y pestis and prophylaxis for plague

Usual Adult Dose for Plague Prophylaxis:

500 mg orally or IV every 24 hours for 10 to 14 days

Comments:

-Drug administration should begin as soon as possible after suspected/confirmed exposure to Yersinia pestis.

-Higher doses (750 mg orally or IV every 24 hours) can be used for treatment of plague if clinically indicated.

-Efficacy studies not conducted in humans with plague for ethical and feasibility reasons; approval based on efficacy study in animals.

Uses: For treatment of plague (including pneumonic and septicemic plague) due to Y pestis and prophylaxis for plague

Usual Adult Dose for Urinary Tract Infection:

Complicated infection:

-For 10-day regimen: 250 mg orally or IV every 24 hours for 10 days

-For 5-day regimen: 750 mg orally or IV every 24 hours for 5 days

Uncomplicated infection: 250 mg orally or IV every 24 hours for 3 days

Comments:

-Since fluoroquinolones (including this drug) have been associated with serious side effects and uncomplicated urinary tract infection (UTI) is self-limiting for some patients, this drug should be saved for treatment of uncomplicated UTIs in patients with no alternative treatment options.

Uses:

-For 10-day regimen: For the treatment of mild to moderate complicated UTIs due to E faecalis, Enterobacter cloacae, E coli, K pneumoniae, P mirabilis, or P aeruginosa

-For 5-day regimen: For the treatment of complicated UTIs due to E coli, K pneumoniae, or P mirabilis

-For the treatment of mild to moderate uncomplicated UTIs due to E coli, K pneumoniae, or S saprophyticus

Usual Adult Dose for Pyelonephritis:

250 mg orally or IV every 24 hours for 10 days

-Including cases with concurrent bacteremia: 750 mg orally or IV every 24 hours for 5 days

Use: For the treatment of acute pyelonephritis due to E coli (including cases with concurrent bacteremia)

Usual Adult Dose for Cystitis:

250 mg orally or IV every 24 hours for 3 days

Comments:

-Since fluoroquinolones (including this drug) have been associated with serious side effects and uncomplicated UTI is self-limiting for some patients, this drug should be saved for treatment of uncomplicated UTIs in patients with no alternative treatment options.

Use: For the treatment of mild to moderate uncomplicated UTIs due to E coli, K pneumoniae, or S saprophyticus

Usual Adult Dose for Bronchitis:

500 mg orally or IV every 24 hours for 7 days

Comments:

-Since fluoroquinolones (including this drug) have been associated with serious side effects and acute bacterial exacerbation of chronic bronchitis (ABECB) is self-limiting for some patients, this drug should be saved for treatment of ABECB in patients with no alternative treatment options.

Use: For the treatment of ABECB due to methicillin-susceptible S aureus, S pneumoniae, H influenzae, H parainfluenzae, or M catarrhalis

Usual Adult Dose for Sinusitis:

500 mg orally or IV every 24 hours for 10 to 14 days or 750 mg orally or IV every 24 hours for 5 days

Comments:

-Since fluoroquinolones (including this drug) have been associated with serious side effects and acute bacterial sinusitis (ABS) is self-limiting for some patients, this drug should be saved for treatment of ABS in patients with no alternative treatment options.

Use: For the treatment of ABS due to S pneumoniae, H influenzae, or M catarrhalis

Usual Adult Dose for Tuberculosis -- Active:

US CDC, Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), and American Thoracic Society (ATS) Recommendations: 500 to 1000 mg orally or IV once a day

Comments:

-Recommended as a second-line drug

-Optimal duration of therapy has not been established.

-The WHO recommends susceptibility testing and a tailored regimen using second-line drugs based on test results, if testing and second-line drugs are available.

-Current guidelines should be consulted for additional information.

Usual Adult Dose for Nongonococcal Urethritis:

US CDC Recommendations: 500 mg orally once a day for 7 days

Comments:

-Recommended as an alternative regimen

-The patient's sexual partner(s) should also be evaluated/treated.

-Current guidelines should be consulted for additional information.

Usual Adult Dose for Chlamydia Infection:

US CDC Recommendations: 500 mg orally once a day for 7 days

Comments:

-Recommended as an alternative regimen

-The patient's sexual partner(s) should also be evaluated/treated.

-Current guidelines should be consulted for additional information.

Usual Adult Dose for Pelvic Inflammatory Disease:

US CDC Recommendations: 500 mg orally once a day for 14 days

Comments:

-Recommended as an alternative agent for mild to moderately severe acute pelvic inflammatory disease (PID)

-Due to high rates of resistance, the US CDC does not recommend fluoroquinolones for treatment of gonococcal infections in the United States; as a result, regimens that include a quinolone are not recommended for the treatment of PID.

-If parenteral cephalosporin therapy is not possible, use of this drug (with oral metronidazole) can be considered if community prevalence and individual risk for gonorrhea are low.

-Prior to therapy, diagnostic tests for gonorrhea must be performed; if test results are positive for quinolone-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae and cephalosporin therapy is not possible, an infectious-disease specialist should be consulted.

-The patient's sexual partner(s) should also be evaluated/treated.

-Current guidelines should be consulted for additional information.

Usual Adult Dose for Epididymitis -- Sexually Transmitted:

US CDC recommendations: 500 mg orally once a day for 10 days

Comments:

-A recommended regimen for acute epididymitis most likely due to enteric organisms

-With ceftriaxone, a recommended regimen for acute epididymitis most likely due to sexually-transmitted chlamydia and gonorrhea and enteric organisms (men practicing insertive anal sex)

-Due to high rates of resistance, the US CDC does not recommend fluoroquinolones for treatment of gonococcal infections in the United States; use of this drug should be considered if infection is most likely due to enteric organisms and tests have ruled out gonorrhea.

-All patients should be tested for other sexually-transmitted infections (including HIV).

-The patient's sexual partner(s) should also be evaluated/treated.

-Current guidelines should be consulted for additional information.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Inhalation Bacillus anthracis:

6 months or older:

Less than 50 kg: 8 mg/kg orally or IV every 12 hours

-Maximum dose: 250 mg/dose

At least 50 kg: 500 mg orally or IV every 24 hours

Duration of therapy: 60 days

Comments:

-Drug administration should begin as soon as possible after suspected/confirmed exposure to aerosolized B anthracis.

-Efficacy based on plasma levels reached in humans, a surrogate endpoint reasonably likely to predict clinical benefit; this drug has not been tested in humans for postexposure prevention of inhalation anthrax.

-Safety of this drug has not been established for therapy durations exceeding 14 days; increased rate of musculoskeletal side effects compared to controls; prolonged therapy recommended only when the benefit outweighs the risk.

Use: For inhalational anthrax (postexposure) to reduce incidence/progression of infection after exposure to aerosolized B anthracis

American Academy of Pediatrics Recommendations for Children 1 Month or Older:

Less than 50 kg: 8 mg/kg orally or IV every 12 hours

-Systemic anthrax when meningitis has been excluded: 10 mg/kg IV every 12 hours

Maximum dose: 250 mg/dose

At least 50 kg: 500 mg orally or IV every 24 hours

Duration of Therapy:

Postexposure prophylaxis for B anthracis infection: 60 days after exposure

Systemic anthrax:

-With possible/confirmed meningitis: At least 2 to 3 weeks or until patient is clinically stable (whichever is longer)

-When meningitis has been excluded: At least 14 days or until patient is clinically stable (whichever is longer)

-Patients will require prophylaxis to complete an antimicrobial regimen of up to 60 days from onset of illness.

Cutaneous anthrax without systemic involvement:

-Bioterrorism-related cases: To complete an antimicrobial regimen of up to 60 days from onset of illness

-Naturally-acquired cases: 7 to 10 days

Follow-up for severe anthrax: To complete a regimen of 14 days or longer

-Patients may require prophylaxis to complete an antimicrobial regimen of up to 60 days from onset of illness.

Comments:

-Recommended as an alternative oral drug for postexposure prophylaxis, for the treatment of cutaneous anthrax without systemic involvement, and follow-up therapy for severe anthrax

-Recommended as an alternative IV drug for the treatment of systemic anthrax

-Recommended for all strains (regardless of penicillin susceptibility or if susceptibility unknown) when used for postexposure prophylaxis, systemic anthrax when meningitis has been excluded, follow-up therapy for severe anthrax, or cutaneous anthrax without systemic involvement

-Recommended for use with a protein synthesis inhibitor when used for systemic anthrax (including follow-up); the addition of a bactericidal antimicrobial (beta-lactam or glycopeptide) is recommended with possible/confirmed meningitis.

-Systemic anthrax includes anthrax meningitis, inhalation anthrax, injection anthrax, gastrointestinal anthrax, and cutaneous anthrax with systemic involvement, extensive edema, or lesions of the head or neck.

-Current guidelines should be consulted for additional information.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Cutaneous Bacillus anthracis:

6 months or older:

Less than 50 kg: 8 mg/kg orally or IV every 12 hours

-Maximum dose: 250 mg/dose

At least 50 kg: 500 mg orally or IV every 24 hours

Duration of therapy: 60 days

Comments:

-Drug administration should begin as soon as possible after suspected/confirmed exposure to aerosolized B anthracis.

-Efficacy based on plasma levels reached in humans, a surrogate endpoint reasonably likely to predict clinical benefit; this drug has not been tested in humans for postexposure prevention of inhalation anthrax.

-Safety of this drug has not been established for therapy durations exceeding 14 days; increased rate of musculoskeletal side effects compared to controls; prolonged therapy recommended only when the benefit outweighs the risk.

Use: For inhalational anthrax (postexposure) to reduce incidence/progression of infection after exposure to aerosolized B anthracis

American Academy of Pediatrics Recommendations for Children 1 Month or Older:

Less than 50 kg: 8 mg/kg orally or IV every 12 hours

-Systemic anthrax when meningitis has been excluded: 10 mg/kg IV every 12 hours

Maximum dose: 250 mg/dose

At least 50 kg: 500 mg orally or IV every 24 hours

Duration of Therapy:

Postexposure prophylaxis for B anthracis infection: 60 days after exposure

Systemic anthrax:

-With possible/confirmed meningitis: At least 2 to 3 weeks or until patient is clinically stable (whichever is longer)

-When meningitis has been excluded: At least 14 days or until patient is clinically stable (whichever is longer)

-Patients will require prophylaxis to complete an antimicrobial regimen of up to 60 days from onset of illness.

Cutaneous anthrax without systemic involvement:

-Bioterrorism-related cases: To complete an antimicrobial regimen of up to 60 days from onset of illness

-Naturally-acquired cases: 7 to 10 days

Follow-up for severe anthrax: To complete a regimen of 14 days or longer

-Patients may require prophylaxis to complete an antimicrobial regimen of up to 60 days from onset of illness.

Comments:

-Recommended as an alternative oral drug for postexposure prophylaxis, for the treatment of cutaneous anthrax without systemic involvement, and follow-up therapy for severe anthrax

-Recommended as an alternative IV drug for the treatment of systemic anthrax

-Recommended for all strains (regardless of penicillin susceptibility or if susceptibility unknown) when used for postexposure prophylaxis, systemic anthrax when meningitis has been excluded, follow-up therapy for severe anthrax, or cutaneous anthrax without systemic involvement

-Recommended for use with a protein synthesis inhibitor when used for systemic anthrax (including follow-up); the addition of a bactericidal antimicrobial (beta-lactam or glycopeptide) is recommended with possible/confirmed meningitis.

-Systemic anthrax includes anthrax meningitis, inhalation anthrax, injection anthrax, gastrointestinal anthrax, and cutaneous anthrax with systemic involvement, extensive edema, or lesions of the head or neck.

-Current guidelines should be consulted for additional information.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Anthrax Prophylaxis:

6 months or older:

Less than 50 kg: 8 mg/kg orally or IV every 12 hours

-Maximum dose: 250 mg/dose

At least 50 kg: 500 mg orally or IV every 24 hours

Duration of therapy: 60 days

Comments:

-Drug administration should begin as soon as possible after suspected/confirmed exposure to aerosolized B anthracis.

-Efficacy based on plasma levels reached in humans, a surrogate endpoint reasonably likely to predict clinical benefit; this drug has not been tested in humans for postexposure prevention of inhalation anthrax.

-Safety of this drug has not been established for therapy durations exceeding 14 days; increased rate of musculoskeletal side effects compared to controls; prolonged therapy recommended only when the benefit outweighs the risk.

Use: For inhalational anthrax (postexposure) to reduce incidence/progression of infection after exposure to aerosolized B anthracis

American Academy of Pediatrics Recommendations for Children 1 Month or Older:

Less than 50 kg: 8 mg/kg orally or IV every 12 hours

-Systemic anthrax when meningitis has been excluded: 10 mg/kg IV every 12 hours

Maximum dose: 250 mg/dose

At least 50 kg: 500 mg orally or IV every 24 hours

Duration of Therapy:

Postexposure prophylaxis for B anthracis infection: 60 days after exposure

Systemic anthrax:

-With possible/confirmed meningitis: At least 2 to 3 weeks or until patient is clinically stable (whichever is longer)

-When meningitis has been excluded: At least 14 days or until patient is clinically stable (whichever is longer)

-Patients will require prophylaxis to complete an antimicrobial regimen of up to 60 days from onset of illness.

Cutaneous anthrax without systemic involvement:

-Bioterrorism-related cases: To complete an antimicrobial regimen of up to 60 days from onset of illness

-Naturally-acquired cases: 7 to 10 days

Follow-up for severe anthrax: To complete a regimen of 14 days or longer

-Patients may require prophylaxis to complete an antimicrobial regimen of up to 60 days from onset of illness.

Comments:

-Recommended as an alternative oral drug for postexposure prophylaxis, for the treatment of cutaneous anthrax without systemic involvement, and follow-up therapy for severe anthrax

-Recommended as an alternative IV drug for the treatment of systemic anthrax

-Recommended for all strains (regardless of penicillin susceptibility or if susceptibility unknown) when used for postexposure prophylaxis, systemic anthrax when meningitis has been excluded, follow-up therapy for severe anthrax, or cutaneous anthrax without systemic involvement

-Recommended for use with a protein synthesis inhibitor when used for systemic anthrax (including follow-up); the addition of a bactericidal antimicrobial (beta-lactam or glycopeptide) is recommended with possible/confirmed meningitis.

-Systemic anthrax includes anthrax meningitis, inhalation anthrax, injection anthrax, gastrointestinal anthrax, and cutaneous anthrax with systemic involvement, extensive edema, or lesions of the head or neck.

-Current guidelines should be consulted for additional information.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Plague:

6 months or older:

Less than 50 kg: 8 mg/kg orally or IV every 12 hours

-Maximum dose: 250 mg/dose

At least 50 kg: 500 mg orally or IV every 24 hours

Duration of therapy: 10 to 14 days

Comments:

-Drug administration should begin as soon as possible after suspected/confirmed exposure to Y pestis.

-Efficacy studies not conducted in humans with plague for ethical and feasibility reasons; approval based on efficacy study in animals.

Uses: For treatment of plague (including pneumonic and septicemic plague) due to Y pestis and prophylaxis for plague

Usual Pediatric Dose for Plague Prophylaxis:

6 months or older:

Less than 50 kg: 8 mg/kg orally or IV every 12 hours

-Maximum dose: 250 mg/dose

At least 50 kg: 500 mg orally or IV every 24 hours

Duration of therapy: 10 to 14 days

Comments:

-Drug administration should begin as soon as possible after suspected/confirmed exposure to Y pestis.

-Efficacy studies not conducted in humans with plague for ethical and feasibility reasons; approval based on efficacy study in animals.

Uses: For treatment of plague (including pneumonic and septicemic plague) due to Y pestis and prophylaxis for plague

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What other drugs will affect Levofloxacin?

Tell your doctor about all medicines you use, and those you start or stop using during your treatment with levofloxacin, especially:

  • a diuretic or "water pill";

  • theophylline;

  • heart rhythm medication--amiodarone, disopyramide, dofetilide, dronedarone, procainamide, quinidine, sotalol, and others;

  • medicine to treat depression or mental illness--amitriptylline, clomipramine, desipramine, iloperidone, imipramine, nortriptyline, and others; or

  • NSAIDs (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs)--aspirin, ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), naproxen (Aleve), celecoxib, diclofenac, indomethacin, meloxicam, and others.

This list is not complete. Other drugs may interact with levofloxacin, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Not all possible interactions are listed in this medication guide.

Levofloxacin interactions

infoInteractions are the effects that happen when the drug is taken along with the food or when taken with other medications. Suppose if you are taking a drug Levofloxacin, it may have interactions with specific foods and specific medications. It will not interact with all foods and medications. The interactions vary from drug to drug. You need to be aware of interactions of the medicine you take. Most medications may interact with alcohol, tobacco, so be cautious. The below-mentioned interactions of Levofloxacin drug are worth giving a glance!

Chelation Agents: Antacids, Sucralfate, Metal Cations, Multivitamins Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs

The concomitant administration of a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug with a fluoroquinolone, including Levofloxacin, may increase the risk of CNS stimulation and convulsive seizures

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Reviews

The results of a survey conducted on nDrugs.com for Levofloxacin are given in detail below. The results of the survey conducted are based on the impressions and views of the website users and consumers taking Levofloxacin. We implore you to kindly base your medical condition or therapeutic choices on the result or test conducted by a physician or licensed medical practitioners.

User reports

2 consumers reported frequency of use

How frequently do I need to take Levofloxacin?
It was reported by nDrugs.com website users that Levofloxacin should ideally be taken Once in a day as the most common frequency of the Levofloxacin. You should you adhere strictly to the instructions and guidelines provided by your doctor on how frequently this Levofloxacin should be taken. Get other patientsí view on how frequent the capsule should be used by clicking here.
Users%
Once in a day2
100.0%


3 consumers reported doses

What doses of Levofloxacin drug you have used?
The drug can be in various doses. Most anti-diabetic, anti-hypertensive drugs, pain killers, or antibiotics are in different low and high doses and prescribed by the doctors depending on the severity and demand of the condition suffered by the patient. In our reports, nDrugs.com website users used these doses of Levofloxacin drug in following percentages. Very few drugs come in a fixed dose or a single dose. Common conditions, like fever, have almost the same doses, e.g., [acetaminophen, 500mg] of drug used by the patient, even though it is available in various doses.
Users%
201-500mg3
100.0%


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