Amebazole Side effects

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What are the possible side effects of Amebazole?

Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur:

More common

Less common

Some side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

Less common

Amebazole may cause your urine to become dark. This is harmless and will go away when you stop using Amebazole.

After you stop using Amebazole, it may still produce some side effects that need attention. During this period of time, check with your doctor immediately if you notice the following side effects:

Other side effects not listed may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your healthcare professional.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

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Side effects of Amebazole in details

A side effect of any drug can be defined as the unwanted or undesired effect produced by the drug. The side effect can be major or in few medications minor that can be ignored. Side effects not only vary from drug to drug, but it also depends on the dose of the drug, the individual sensitivity of the person, brand or company which manufactures it. If side effects overweigh the actual effect of the medicine, it may be difficult to convince the patient to take the drug. Few patients get specific side effects to specific drugs; in that case, a doctor replaces the drug with another. If you feel any side effect and it troubles you, do not forget to share with your healthcare practitioner.
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In two multicenter clinical trials, a total of 270 patients received 750 mg Amebazole tablets orally once daily for 7 days, and 287 were treated with a comparator agent administered intravaginally once daily for 7 days.

Most adverse events were described as being of mild or moderate severity. Among patients taking Amebazole who reported headaches, 10% considered them severe, and less than 2% of reported episodes of nausea were considered severe. Metallic taste was reported by 9% of patients taking Amebazole.

Adverse events reported at ≥ 2% incidence for either treatment group, irrespective of treatment causality, are summarized in the table below.

Adverse Events ( ≥ 2% Incidence Rate)—Irrespective of Treatment Causality

Amebazole 7 days

(N=267)

Vaginal Preparation

(N=285)

Headache 48 (18%) 44 (15%)
Vaginitis 39 (15%) 32 (12%)
Nausea 28 (10%) 8 (3%)
Taste Perversion (metallic taste) 23 (9%) 1 (0%)
Infection Bacterial 19 (7%) 17 (6%)
Influenza-like Symptoms 17 (6%) 20 (7%)
Pruritus Genital 14 (5%) 25 (9%)
Abdominal Pain 10 (4%) 13 (5%)
Dizziness 11 (4%) 3 (1%)
Diarrhea 11 (4%) 3 (1%)
Upper Respiratory Tract Infection 11 (4%) 10 (4%)
Rhinitis 12 (4%) 10 (4%)
Sinusitis 7 (3%) 6 (2%)
Urine Abnormal 7 (3%) 4 (1%)
Pharyngitis 8 (3%) 4 (1%)
Dysmenorrhea 9 (3%) 7 (2%)
Moniliasis 9 (3%) 8 (3%)
Mouth Dry 5 (2%) 2 (1%)
Urinary Tract Infection 6 (2%) 16 (6%)

Vulvovaginal candidiasis is a recognized consequence of treatment with many anti-infective agents. In these multicenter clinical trials, there were no statistically significant differences in the incidence rates of yeast vaginitis for groups of patients treated with Amebazole or the vaginal comparator.

The following reactions have been reported during treatment with Amebazole:

Central Nervous System: The most serious adverse reactions reported in patients treated with Amebazole have been convulsive seizures, encephalopathy, aseptic meningitis, optic and peripheral neuropathy, the latter characterized mainly by numbness or paresthesia of an extremity. Since persistent peripheral neuropathy has been reported in some patients receiving prolonged administration of Amebazole, patients should be specifically warned about these reactions and should be told to stop the drug and report immediately to their physicians if any neurologic symptoms occur. In addition, patients have reported headache, syncope, dizziness, vertigo, incoordination, ataxia, confusion, dysarthria, irritability, depression, weakness, and insomnia.

Gastrointestinal: The most common adverse reactions reported have been referable to the gastrointestinal tract, particularly nausea, sometimes accompanied by headache, anorexia, and occasionally vomiting, diarrhea, epigastric distress; abdominal cramping; and constipation.

Mouth: A sharp, unpleasant metallic taste is not unusual. Furry tongue, glossitis, and stomatitis have occurred; these may be associated with a sudden overgrowth of Candida which may occur during therapy.

Dermatologic: Erythematous rash and pruritus.

Hematopoietic: Reversible neutropenia (leukopenia); rarely, reversible thrombocytopenia.

Cardiovascular: Flattening of the T-wave may be seen in electrocardiographic tracings.

Hypersensitivity: Urticaria, erythematous rash, Stevens-Johnson Syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis, flushing, nasal congestion, dryness of the mouth (or vagina or vulva), and fever.

Renal: Dysuria, cystitis, polyuria, incontinence, and a sense of pelvic pressure. Instances of darkened urine have been reported by approximately one patient in 100,000. Although the pigment which is probably responsible for this phenomenon has not been positively identified, it is almost certainly a metabolite of Amebazole and seems to have no clinical significance.

Other: Proliferation of Candida in the vagina, dyspareunia, decrease of libido, proctitis, and fleeting joint pains sometimes resembling “serum sickness.” Rare cases of pancreatitis, which generally abated on withdrawal of the drug, have been reported.

Patients with Crohn's disease are known to have an increased incidence of gastrointestinal and certain extraintestinal cancers. There have been some reports in the medical literature of breast and colon cancer in Crohn's disease patients who have been treated with Amebazole at high doses for extended periods of time. A cause and effect relationship has not been established. Crohn's disease is not an approved indication for Amebazole 750 mg tablets.

REFERENCES

5. Integrated clinical and statistical report for the treatment of bacterial vaginosis with Amebazole modified release tablet— a dose duration study. G.D. Searle & Co., Protocol No. N13-95-02-015; Report No. N13-96-06-015, 19 Nov 1996.

6. Integrated clinical and statistical report for the treatment of bacterial vaginosis with Amebazole modified release tablet. G.D. Searle & Co., Protocol No. N13-95-02-017; Report No. N13-96-06-017, 11 Nov 1996.

What is the most important information I should know about Amebazole?

Amebazole contraindications

Contraindication can be described as a special circumstance or a disease or a condition wherein you are not supposed to use the drug or undergo particular treatment as it can harm the patient; at times, it can be dangerous and life threatening as well. When a procedure should not be combined with other procedure or when a medicine cannot be taken with another medicine, it is called Relative contraindication. Contraindications should be taken seriously as they are based on the relative clinical experience of health care providers or from proven research findings.
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Hypersensitivity

Amebazole Capsules 375 mg are contraindicated in patients with a prior history of hypersensitivity to Amebazole or other nitroimidazole derivatives.

In patients with trichomoniasis, Amebazole Capsules 375 mg are contraindicated during the first trimester of pregnancy.

Psychotic Reaction with Disulfiram

Use of oral Amebazole is associated with psychotic reactions in alcoholic patients who were using disulfiram concurrently. Do not administer Amebazole to patients who have taken disulfiram within the last two weeks.

Interaction with Alcohol

Use of oral Amebazole is associated with a disulfiram-like reaction to alcohol, including abdominal cramps, nausea, vomiting, headaches, and flushing. Discontinue consumption of alcohol or products containing propylene glycol during and for at least three days after therapy with Amebazole.

References

  1. DailyMed. "BISMUTH SUBCITRATE POTASSIUM; METRONIDAZOLE; TETRACYCLINE: DailyMed provides trustworthy information about marketed drugs in the United States. DailyMed is the official provider of FDA label information (package inserts).". https://dailymed.nlm.nih.gov/dailyme... (accessed September 17, 2018).
  2. DTP/NCI. "metronidazole: The NCI Development Therapeutics Program (DTP) provides services and resources to the academic and private-sector research communities worldwide to facilitate the discovery and development of new cancer therapeutic agents.". https://dtp.cancer.gov/dtpstandard/s... (accessed September 17, 2018).
  3. European Chemicals Agency - ECHA. "Metronidazole: The information provided here is aggregated from the "Notified classification and labelling" from ECHA's C&L Inventory. ". https://echa.europa.eu/information-o... (accessed September 17, 2018).

Reviews

The results of a survey conducted on ndrugs.com for Amebazole are given in detail below. The results of the survey conducted are based on the impressions and views of the website users and consumers taking Amebazole. We implore you to kindly base your medical condition or therapeutic choices on the result or test conducted by a physician or licensed medical practitioners.

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Information checked by Dr. Sachin Kumar, MD Pharmacology

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