Amphetamine Sulfate Overdose

sponsored
Is this medication very expensive?

What happens if I overdose Amphetamine Sulfate?

Contact 1-800-222-1222 (the American Association of Poison Control Centers), your local poison control center, or emergency room immediately.

Proper storage of Amphetamine Sulfate:

Store Amphetamine Sulfate at room temperature, between 68 and 77 degrees F (20 and 25 degrees C). Store away from heat, moisture, and light. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep Amphetamine Sulfate out of the reach of children and away from pets.

Overdose of Amphetamine Sulfate in details

When a dose is taken in higher dose than the recommended doses, it is called Overdose. Overdose always needs a clinical supervision. Any medicine or drug when consumed in Overdose produces untoward side effects on one or various organs in the body. A medicine is excreted in the kidney or metabolized in the liver most of the times. This process goes without any hurdles when taken in normal dose, but when taken in an overdose, the body is not able to metabolize it or send it out properly which causes the effects of anoverdose.
sponsored

Individual patient response to amphetamines varies widely. While toxic symptoms occasionally occur as an idiosyncrasy at doses as low as 2 mg, they are rare with doses of less than 15 mg; 30 mg can produce severe reactions, yet doses of 400 to 500 mg are not necessarily fatal.

In rats, the oral LD50 of dextroamphetamine sulfate is 96.8 mg/Kg.

Symptoms

Manifestations of acute overdosage with amphetamines include restlessness, tremor, hyperreflexia, rhabdomyolysis, rapid respiration, hyperpyrexia, confusion, assaultiveness, hallucinations, panic states. Fatigue and depression usually follow the central stimulation. Cardiovascular effects include arrhythmias, hypertension, or hypotension and circulatory collapse. Gastrointestinal symptoms include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal cramps. Fatal poisoning is usually preceded by convulsions and coma.

Treatment

Management of acute Amphetamine Sulfate intoxication is largely symptomatic and includes gastric lavage and sedation with a barbiturate. Experience with hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis is inadequate to permit recommendation in this regard. Acidification of the urine increases Amphetamine Sulfate excretion. If acute, severe hypertension complicates Amphetamine Sulfate overdosage, administration of intravenous phentolamine has been suggested. However, a gradual drop in blood pressure will usually result when sufficient sedation has been achieved. Chlorpromazine antagonizes the central stimulant effects of amphetamines and can be used to treat Amphetamine Sulfate intoxication.

What should I avoid while taking Amphetamine Sulfate?

Use caution when driving, operating machinery, or performing other hazardous activities. Amphetamine Sulfate may cause dizziness, blurred vision, or restlessness, and it may hide the symptoms of extreme tiredness. If you experience these effects, avoid hazardous activities.

Do not take Amphetamine Sulfate late in the day. A dose taken too late in the day can cause insomnia.

Amphetamine Sulfate warnings

Warnings are a mix of Precautions. Contraindications and interactions and serious harmful effects associated with the medicine intake. A diabetic or Hypertensive patient need to be warned about few drug interactions. A known hypersensitivity patient needs to be careful about the reactions or anaphylactic shock. A pregnant woman or a breastfeeding woman should be warned of certain medications. A Hepatitis [liver disease] patient or a cardiac patient should avoid few drugs.
sponsored

Potential for Abuse and Dependence

CNS stimulants, including Amphetamine Sulfate, other Amphetamine Sulfate-containing products, and methylphenidate, have a high potential for abuse and dependence. Assess the risk of abuse prior to prescribing and monitor for signs of abuse and dependence while on therapy.

Serious Cardiovascular Reactions

Sudden death, stroke, and myocardial infarction have been reported in adults with CNS stimulant treatment at recommended doses. Sudden death has been reported in pediatric patients with structural cardiac abnormalities and other serious heart problems taking CNS stimulants at recommended doses for ADHD. Avoid use in patients with known structural cardiac abnormalities, cardiomyopathy, serious heart arrhythmia, coronary artery disease, and other serious heart problems. Further evaluate patients who develop exertional chest pain, unexplained syncope, or arrhythmias during Amphetamine Sulfate treatment.

Blood Pressure and Heart Rate Increases

CNS stimulants cause an increase in blood pressure (mean increase about 2-4 mm Hg) and heart rate (mean increase about 3-6 bpm). Monitor all patients for potential tachycardia and hypertension.

Psychiatric Adverse Reactions

Exacerbation of Pre-Existing Psychosis

CNS stimulants may exacerbate symptoms of behavior disturbance and thought disorder in patients with a pre-existing psychotic disorder.

Induction of a Manic Episode in Patients with Bipolar Illness

CNS stimulants may induce a mixed or manic episode in patients with bipolar disorder. Prior to initiating treatment, screen patients for risk factors for developing a manic episode (e.g., comorbid or has a history of depressive symptoms or a family history of suicide, bipolar disorder, and depression).

New Psychotic or Manic Symptoms

CNS stimulants, at recommended doses, may cause psychotic or manic symptoms (e.g., hallucinations, delusional thinking, or mania) in patients without prior history of psychotic illness or mania. If such symptoms occur, consider discontinuing Amphetamine Sulfate. In a pooled analysis of multiple short-term, placebo-controlled studies of CNS stimulants, psychotic or manic symptoms occurred in 0.1% of CNS stimulant-treated patients compared to 0% in placebo-treated patients.

Long-Term Suppression of Growth

CNS stimulants have been associated with weight loss and slowing of growth rate in pediatric patients. Closely monitor growth (weight and height) in pediatric patients treated with CNS stimulants, including Amphetamine Sulfate.

Patients who are not growing or gaining height or weight as expected may need to have their treatment interrupted [Use in Specific Populations (8.4)].

Seizures

There is some clinical evidence that stimulants may lower the convulsive threshold in patients with prior history of seizures, in patients with prior EEG abnormalities in absence of seizures, and, very rarely, in patients without a history of seizures and no prior EEG evidence of seizures. In the presence of seizures, discontinue Amphetamine Sulfate.

Peripheral Vasculopathy, including Raynaud's Phenomenon

Stimulants, including Amphetamine Sulfate, used to treat ADHD are associated with peripheral vasculopathy, including Raynaud's phenomenon. Signs and symptoms are usually intermittent and mild; however, very rare sequelae include digital ulceration and/or soft tissue breakdown. Effects of peripheral vasculopathy, including Raynaud's phenomenon, were observed in post-marketing reports at different times and at therapeutic doses in all age groups throughout the course of treatment. Signs and symptoms generally improve after reduction in dose or discontinuation of drug. Careful observation for digital changes is necessary during treatment with ADHD stimulants. Further clinical evaluation (e.g., rheumatology referral) may be appropriate for certain patients.

Serotonin Syndrome

Serotonin syndrome, a potentially life-threatening reaction, may occur when amphetamines are used in combination with other drugs that affect the serotonergic neurotransmitter systems such as MAOIs, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), triptans, tricyclic antidepressants, fentanyl, lithium, tramadol, tryptophan, buspirone, and St. John's Wort. The co-administration with cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) inhibitors may also increase the risk with increased exposure to Amphetamine Sulfate. In these situations, consider an alternative non-serotonergic drug or an alternative drug that does not inhibit CYP2D6.

Serotonin syndrome symptoms may include mental status changes (e.g., agitation, hallucinations, delirium, and coma), autonomic instability (e.g., tachycardia, labile blood pressure, dizziness, diaphoresis, flushing, hyperthermia), neuromuscular symptoms (e.g., tremor, rigidity, myoclonus, hyperreflexia, incoordination), seizures, and/or gastrointestinal symptoms (e.g., nausea, vomiting, diarrhea).

Concomitant use of Amphetamine Sulfate with MAOI drugs is contraindicated.

Discontinue treatment with Amphetamine Sulfate and any concomitant serotonergic agents immediately if the above symptoms occur, and initiate supportive symptomatic treatment. If concomitant use of Amphetamine Sulfate with other serotonergic drugs or CYP2D6 inhibitors is clinically warranted, initiate Amphetamine Sulfate with lower doses, monitor patients for the emergence of serotonin syndrome during drug initiation or titration, and inform patients of the increased risk for serotonin syndrome.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Amphetamine Sulfate?

  • If you have an allergy to Amphetamine Sulfate (Amphetamine Sulfate oral suspension (Amphetamine Sulfate)) or any part of Amphetamine Sulfate (Amphetamine Sulfate oral suspension (Amphetamine Sulfate)).
  • If you are allergic to any drugs like this one, any other drugs, foods, or other substances. Tell your doctor about the allergy and what signs you had, like rash; hives; itching; shortness of breath; wheezing; cough; swelling of face, lips, tongue, or throat; or any other signs.
  • If you or a family member have any of these health problems: Blood vessel disease, high blood pressure, heart structure problems or other heart problems, or Tourette's syndrome or tics.
  • If you have any of these health problems: Glaucoma; nervous, anxious, or tense state; or overactive thyroid.
  • If you have ever had any of these health problems: Drug abuse or stroke.
  • If you are taking acetazolamide.
  • If you are taking sodium bicarbonate.
  • If you have taken certain drugs used for low mood (depression) like isocarboxazid, phenelzine, or tranylcypromine or drugs used for Parkinson's disease like selegiline or rasagiline in the last 14 days. Taking Amphetamine Sulfate (Amphetamine Sulfate oral suspension (Amphetamine Sulfate)) within 14 days of those drugs can cause very bad high blood pressure.
  • If you are taking any of these drugs: Linezolid or methylene blue.
  • If you are taking any of these drugs: Cimetidine, dexlansoprazole, esomeprazole, famotidine, lansoprazole, nizatidine, omeprazole, pantoprazole, rabeprazole, or ranitidine.
  • If you are breast-feeding. Do not breast-feed while you take Amphetamine Sulfate (Amphetamine Sulfate oral suspension (Amphetamine Sulfate)).

This is not a list of all drugs or health problems that interact with Amphetamine Sulfate (Amphetamine Sulfate oral suspension (Amphetamine Sulfate)).

Tell your doctor and pharmacist about all of your drugs (prescription or OTC, natural products, vitamins) and health problems. You must check to make sure that it is safe for you to take Amphetamine Sulfate (Amphetamine Sulfate oral suspension (Amphetamine Sulfate)) with all of your drugs and health problems. Do not start, stop, or change the dose of any drug without checking with your doctor.

Amphetamine Sulfate precautions

Certain people who are very sick or very old or who are sensitive show an exacerbation of side effect of the drug which can turn dangerous at times. So, it is very important to remember the precautions while taking the medicine. Pregnancy and Breastfeeding are also special categories wherein extra care or precaution is needed when taking a drug. Few patients may have a hypersensitivity reaction to few medications, and that can be life-threatening rarely. Penicillin hypersensitivity is one example. Diarrhea, rashes are few other symptoms which need a watch. A patient with other co-existing diseases like liver disease, heart disease, kidney disease should take special precautions.
sponsored

Potential For Abuse And Dependence

CNS stimulants, including Amphetamine Sulfate, other Amphetamine Sulfate-containing products, and methylphenidate, have a high potential for abuse and dependence. Assess the risk of abuse prior to prescribing, and monitor for signs of abuse and dependence while on therapy.

Serious Cardiovascular Reactions

Sudden death, stroke, and myocardial infarction have been reported in adults with CNS stimulant treatment at recommended doses. Sudden death has been reported in pediatric patients with structural cardiac abnormalities and other serious heart problems taking CNS stimulants at recommended doses for ADHD. Avoid use in patients with known structural cardiac abnormalities, cardiomyopathy, serious heart arrhythmia, coronary artery disease, and other serious heart problems. Further evaluate patients who develop exertional chest pain, unexplained syncope, or arrhythmias during Amphetamine Sulfate treatment.

Blood Pressure And Heart Rate Increases

CNS stimulants cause an increase in blood pressure (mean increase about 2-4 mm Hg) and heart rate (mean increase about 3-6 bpm). Monitor all patients for potential tachycardia and hypertension.

Psychiatric Adverse Reactions

Exacerbation Pre-Existing Psychosis

CNS stimulants may exacerbate symptoms of behavior disturbance and thought disorder in patients with a pre-existing psychotic disorder.

Induction Of A Manic Episode In Patients With Bipolar Illness

CNS stimulants may induce a mixed or manic episode in patients with bipolar disorder. Prior to initiating treatment, screen patients for risk factors for developing a manic episode (e.g., comorbid or has a history of depressive symptoms or a family history of suicide, bipolar disorder, and depression).

New Psychotic Or Manic Symptoms

CNS stimulants, at recommended doses, may cause psychotic or manic symptoms, e.g., hallucinations, delusional thinking, or mania in patients without prior history of psychotic illness or mania. If such symptoms occur, consider discontinuing Amphetamine Sulfate. In a pooled analysis of multiple short-term, placebo-controlled studies of CNS stimulants, psychotic or manic symptoms occurred in 0.1% of CNS stimulant-treated patients compared to 0% in placebo-treated patients.

Long-Term Suppression Of Growth

CNS stimulants have been associated with weight loss and slowing of growth rate in pediatric patients. Closely monitor growth (weight and height) in pediatric patients treated with CNS stimulants, including Amphetamine Sulfate.

Peripheral Vasculopathy, Including Raynaud’s Phenomenon

Stimulants, including Amphetamine Sulfate, used to treat ADHD are associated with peripheral vasculopathy, including Raynaud’s phenomenon. Signs and symptoms are usually intermittent and mild; however, very rare sequelae include digital ulceration and/or soft tissue breakdown. Effects of peripheral vasculopathy, including Raynaud’s phenomenon, were observed in post-marketing reports at different times and at therapeutic doses in all age groups throughout the course of treatment. Signs and symptoms generally improve after reduction in dose or discontinuation of drug. Careful observation for digital changes is necessary during treatment with ADHD stimulants. Further clinical evaluation (e.g., rheumatology referral) may be appropriate for certain patients.

Potential For Overdose Due To Medication Errors

Medication errors, including substitution and dispensing errors, between Amphetamine Sulfate and other Amphetamine Sulfate products could occur, leading to possible overdosage. To avoid substitution errors and overdosage, do not substitute for other Amphetamine Sulfate products on a milligram-per-milligram basis because of different Amphetamine Sulfate base compositions and differing pharmacokinetic profiles.

Patient Counseling Information

Advise the patient to read the FDA-approved patient labeling (Medication Guide).

Controlled Substance Status/Potential For Abuse, Misuse, And Dependence

Advise patients that Amphetamine Sulfate is a federally controlled substance because it can be abused or lead to dependence. Advise patients to store Amphetamine Sulfate in a safe place, preferably locked, to prevent abuse. Advise patients to comply with laws and regulations on drug disposal. Advise patients to dispose of remaining, unused, or expired Amphetamine Sulfate by a medicine take-back program if available.

Dosage And Administration Instructions

Provide the following instructions on administration to the patient:

  • The tablet should remain in the blister pack until the patient is ready to take it.
  • The patient or caregiver should use dry hands to open the blister.
  • Tear along the perforation, bend the blister where indicated and peel back the blister’s labeled backing to take out the tablet. The tablet should not be pushed through the foil.
  • As soon as the blister is opened, the tablet should be removed and placed on the patient’s tongue.
  • The whole tablet should be placed on the tongue and allowed to disintegrate without chewing or crushing.
  • The tablet will disintegrate in saliva so that it can be swallowed.
Serious Cardiovascular Risks

Advise patients of serious cardiovascular risk (including sudden death, myocardial infarction, stroke, and hypertension) with Amphetamine Sulfate. Instruct patients to contact a healthcare provider immediately if they develop symptoms such as exertional chest pain, unexplained syncope, or other symptoms suggestive of cardiac disease.

Blood Pressure And Heart Rate Increases

Instruct patients that Amphetamine Sulfate can cause elevations of their blood pressure and pulse rate.

Psychiatric Risks

Advise patients that Amphetamine Sulfate, at recommended doses, may cause psychotic symptoms or mania.

Long-Term Suppression Of Growth

Advise patients that Amphetamine Sulfate may cause slowing of growth and weight loss.

Circulation Problems In Fingers And Toes [Peripheral Vasculopathy, Including Raynaud’s Phenomenon]

Instruct patients beginning treatment with Amphetamine Sulfate about the risk of peripheral vasculopathy, including Raynaud’s phenomenon, and associated signs and symptoms: fingers or toes may feel numb, cool, painful, and/or may change color from pale, to blue, to red.

Instruct patients to report to their physician any new numbness, pain, skin color change, or sensitivity to temperature in fingers or toes.

Instruct patients to call their physician immediately with any signs of unexplained wounds appearing on fingers or toes while taking Amphetamine Sulfate.

Further clinical evaluation (e.g., rheumatology referral) may be appropriate for certain patients.

Pregnancy

Advise patients to notify their healthcare provider if they become pregnant or intend to become pregnant during treatment with Amphetamine Sulfate. Advise patients of the potential fetal effects from the use of Amphetamine Sulfate during pregnancy.

Nursing

Advise patients not to breastfeed if they are taking Amphetamine Sulfate.

Alcohol

Advise patients to avoid alcohol while taking Amphetamine Sulfate. Consumption of alcohol while taking Amphetamine Sulfate may result in a more rapid release of the dose of Amphetamine Sulfate.

Nonclinical Toxicology

Carcinogenesis, Mutagenesis, Impairment Of Fertility

Carcinogenesis

No evidence of carcinogenicity was found in studies in which d,l-Amphetamine Sulfate (enantiomer ratio of 1:1) was administered to mice and rats in the diet for 2 years at doses of up to 30 mg/kg/day in male mice, 19 mg/kg/day in female mice, and 5 mg/kg/day in male and female rats. These doses are approximately 2.4, 1.5, and 0.8 times, respectively, the maximum recommended human dose for children of 18.8 mg/day (as base), on a mg/m basis. Post dosing hyperactivity was seen at all doses; motor activity measured prior to the daily dose was decreased during the dosing period but the decreased motor activity was largely absent after an 18 day drug-free recovery period. Performance in the Morris water maze test for learning and memory was impaired at the 40 mg/kg dose, and sporadically at the lower doses, when measured prior to the daily dose during the treatment period; no recovery was seen after a 19 day drug-free period. A delay in the developmental milestones of vaginal opening and preputial separation was seen at 40 mg/kg but there was no effect on fertility.

Geriatric Use

Amphetamine Sulfate has not been studied in the geriatric population.

What happens if I miss a dose of Amphetamine Sulfate?

When you miss a dose, you should take it as soon as you remember, but you should take care that it should be well spaced from the next dose. You should not take an extra dose at the time of the second dose as it will become a double dose. The double dose can give unwanted side effects, so be careful. In chronic conditions or when you have a serious health issue, if you miss a dose, you should inform your health care provider and ask his suggestion.

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. However, if it is almost time for the next dose or if it is already evening, skip the missed dose and take only the next regularly scheduled dose. A dose taken too late in the day may cause insomnia. Do not take a double dose of this medication.



References

  1. DailyMed. "AMPHETAMINE: DailyMed provides trustworthy information about marketed drugs in the United States. DailyMed is the official provider of FDA label information (package inserts).". https://dailymed.nlm.nih.gov/dailyme... (accessed September 17, 2018).
  2. DrugBank. "AMPHETAMINE". http://www.drugbank.ca/drugs/DB00182 (accessed September 17, 2018).
  3. MeSH. "Dopamine Agents". https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/68... (accessed September 17, 2018).

Reviews

Consumer reviews


There are no reviews yet. Be the first to write one!


Your name: 
Email: 
Spam protection:  < Type 22 here

Information checked by Dr. Sachin Kumar, MD Pharmacology

| Privacy Policy
This site does not supply any medicines. It contains prices for information purposes only.
© 2003 - 2021 ndrugs.com All Rights Reserved