Anfetamina Pregnancy

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Pregnancy of Anfetamina in details

infoPregnancy is always a special situation where every action or side effect of the drug varies when compared to a situation of a non-pregnant patient. It is not only because the pregnant woman's metabolism differs due to the hormonal and other changes happened to her, but also because every medicine or its metabolite passes to the baby and shows its action there. The only thing is, be cautious, attentive and well supervised when you take any single drug in pregnancy. The interactions can vary in pregnancy, and the dosage may differ as well. Strict supervision of the Physician is mandatory.
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The limited published data in human pregnancy is insufficient to determine a drug-associated risk of major congenital malformations or miscarriage. In animal studies, no effects on morphological development were seen but long-term neurochemical and behavioral effects (e.g., learning and memory deficits, altered locomotor activity, changes in sexual function) have been reported at clinically relevant doses. Fetal malformations and death as well as severe maternal toxicity were observed in animals following parenteral administration of d-Anfetamina doses approximately 6 times the MRHD or greater. Animal studies with d- to l-Anfetamina ratio of 3.2 to 1 did not reveal any effects on fertility or early embryonic development at doses of approximately 5 times the MRHD. US FDA pregnancy category C: Animal reproduction studies have shown an adverse effect on the fetus and there are no adequate and well-controlled studies in humans, but potential benefits may warrant use of the drug in pregnant women despite potential risks. US FDA pregnancy category Not Assigned: The US FDA has amended the pregnancy labeling rule for prescription drug products to require labeling that includes a summary of risk, a discussion of the data supporting that summary, and relevant information to help health care providers make prescribing decisions and counsel women about the use of drugs during pregnancy. Pregnancy categories A, B, C, D and X are being phased out.

Use is recommended only if the benefit justifies the risk to the fetus. US FDA pregnancy category: C (immediate-release oral tablet) US FDA pregnancy category: Not Assigned (extended-release oral suspension) Comments: -Infants born to mothers dependent on amphetamines have an increased risk of premature delivery and low birth weight; these infants should be monitored for feeding difficulties, irritability, agitation, excessive drowsiness and other withdrawal symptoms. -This drug and others within the Anfetamina class may cause vasoconstriction of placental blood vessels and increase the risk for intrauterine growth restriction.

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Anfetamina breastfeeding

infoWhen a drug is taken when the patient is breast feeding, a part of the drug is secreted in her breast milk and is passed to the baby. The dosage of the medicine to mother and baby are different, and many drugs actions are side effects when you take them without a disease, and what if you the baby takes them without a disease? What if the drug is contraindicated in newborns, infants or children? So, breastfeeding is a very alarming situation when the mother is on medications. Ask your Physician or Pediatrician about the effect of the drug on the baby and how much is excreted in breast milk and if it harms the baby!
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Breastfeeding is not recommending during treatment. Excreted into human milk: Yes Comments: -The effect of Anfetamina in milk on the neurological development of the breastfed infant has not been well studied. -Large dosages of Anfetamina might interfere with milk production, especially in women whose lactation is not well established.

-The urinary excretion in a breastfed infant whose mother took Anfetamina 35 mg daily and exclusively breastfed for 6 months ranged from 1.9% to 2.1% of the mother's excretion; this infant experienced no adverse reactions and grew normally, and the mother experienced no adverse effect on milk production. -The urinary excretion in a breastfed infant whose mother took racemic Anfetamina 5 mg four times daily ranged from 0.1% to 0.3% of the mother's excretion; this infant showed no signs of abnormal development during the first 2 years of life. -In a study of 20 postpartum women, dextroamphetamine reduced serum prolactin by 25% to 32% (7.5 mg IV dose) and 30% to 37% (15 mg IV dose). Another study showed a 20 mg oral dose of dextroamphetamine produced a sustained suppression of serum prolactin by 40%.

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References for pregnancy information

  1. "Product Information. Dyanavel XR (Anfetamina)." Tris Pharma Inc, Monmouth Junction, NJ.
  2. "Product Information. Evekeo (Anfetamina)." Arbor Pharmaceuticals, Atlanta, GA.
  3. United States National Library of Medicine "Toxnet. Toxicology Data Network. Available from: URL: http://toxnet.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/sis/htmlgen?LACT." ([cited 2013 -]):

References for breastfeeding information

  1. "Product Information. Dyanavel XR (Anfetamina)." Tris Pharma Inc, Monmouth Junction, NJ.
  2. "Product Information. Evekeo (Anfetamina)." Arbor Pharmaceuticals, Atlanta, GA.
  3. United States National Library of Medicine "Toxnet. Toxicology Data Network. Available from: URL: http://toxnet.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/sis/htmlgen?LACT." ([cited 2013 -]):


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References

  1. DailyMed. "AMPHETAMINE: DailyMed provides trustworthy information about marketed drugs in the United States. DailyMed is the official provider of FDA label information (package inserts).". https://dailymed.nlm.nih.gov/dailyme... (accessed September 17, 2018).
  2. PubMed Health. "Amphetamine (By mouth) (Adzenys ER): This section provide the link out information of drugs collectetd in PubMed Health. ". http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhe... (accessed September 17, 2018).
  3. Human Metabolome Database (HMDB). "Amphetamine: The Human Metabolome Database (HMDB) is a freely available electronic database containing detailed information about small molecule metabolites found in the human body.". http://www.hmdb.ca/metabolites/HMDB0... (accessed September 17, 2018).

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