Betamethasone valerate/Gentamicin sulfate/miconazole nitrate Dosage

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Consists of betamethasone valerate, Gentamicin sulfate, miconazole nitrate

Dosage of Betamethasone valerate in details

The dose of a drug and dosage of the drug are two different terminologies. Dose is defined as the quantity or amount of medicine given by the doctor or taken by the patient at a given period. Dosage is the regimen prescribed by the doctor about how many days and how many times per day the drug is to be taken in specified dose by the patient. The dose is expressed in mg for tablets or gm, micro gm sometimes, ml for syrups or drops for kids syrups. The dose is not fixed for a drug for all conditions, and it changes according to the condition or a disease. It also changes on the age of the patient.
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Betamethasone valerate Cream/Betamethasone valerate RD Cream: A small quantity should be applied to the affected area 2 or 3 times daily until improvement occurs. It may then be possible to maintain improvement by applying once a day or even less often or by using the appropriate ready-diluted (1 in 4) preparation Betamethasone valerate RD Cream.

Betamethasone valerate Cream: Betamethasone valerate creams are especially appropriate for moist or weeping surfaces.

In the more resistant lesions eg, the thickened plaques of psoriasis on elbows and knees, the effect of Betamethasone valerate can be enhanced, if necessary, by occluding the treatment area with polythene film. Overnight occlusion only is usually adequate to bring about a satisfactory response in such lesions thereafter, improvement can usually be maintained by regular application without occlusion.

Betamethasone valerate RD Cream: A small amount of Betamethasone valerate RD Cream may be applied up to 3 times daily. Betamethasone valerate RD Cream is especially appropriate for moist or weeping surfaces.

Betamethasone valerate Scalp Application: A small quantity of Betamethasone valerate Scalp Application should be applied to the scalp night and morning until improvement is noticeable. It may then be possible to sustain improvement by applying once a day or less frequently.

Due to the flammable nature of Betamethasone valerate Scalp Application, patients should avoid smoking, heat including the use of hair dryer or being near an open flame during application and immediately after use.

Children: Betamethasone valerate valerate is contraindicated in children <1 year.

Children are more likely to develop local and systemic side effects of topical corticosteroids and in general, require shorter courses and less potent agents than adults.

Care should be taken when using Betamethasone valerate valerate to ensure the amount applied is the minimum that provides therapeutic benefit.

Elderly: The greater frequency of decreased hepatic or renal function in the elderly may delay elimination if systemic absorption occurs. Therefore, the minimum quantity should be used for the shortest duration to achieve the desired clinical benefit.

Renal/Hepatic Impairment: In case of systemic absorption (when application is over a large surface area for a prolonged period), metabolism and elimination may be delayed therefore increasing the risk of systemic toxicity. Therefore, the minimum quantity should be used for the shortest duration to achieve the desired clinical benefit.

What other drugs will affect Betamethasone valerate?

Many drugs can affect Betamethasone valerate. This includes prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Not all possible interactions are listed here. Tell your doctor about all your current medicines and any medicine you start or stop using.

Betamethasone valerate drug interactions (in more detail)

Betamethasone valerate interactions

Interactions are the effects that happen when the drug is taken along with the food or when taken with other medications. Suppose if you are taking a drug Betamethasone valerate, it may have interactions with specific foods and specific medications. It will not interact with all foods and medications. The interactions vary from drug to drug. You need to be aware of interactions of the medicine you take. Most medications may interact with alcohol, tobacco, so be cautious.
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Concurrent use of barbiturates, carbamazepine, phenytoin, primidone or rifampicin may enhance the metabolism and reduce the effects of systemic corticosteroids. Conversely, oral contraceptives or ritonavir may increase plasma concentrations of corticosteroids.

Use of corticosteroids with potassium-depleting diuretics eg, thiazides or furosemide may cause excessive potassium loss. There is also an increased risk of hypokalemia with concurrent amphotericin B or bronchodilator therapy with xanthines or β2 agonist.

There may be an increased incidence of gastrointestinal bleeding and ulceration when corticosteroids are given with NSAIDs. Corticosteroids may alter response to anticoagulants increasing requirements of antidiabetic drugs and antihypertensives.

Corticosteroids may decrease serum concentrations of salicylates and may decrease the effect of antimuscarinics in myasthenia gravis.

Dosage of Gentamicin sulfate in details

The dose of a drug and dosage of the drug are two different terminologies. Dose is defined as the quantity or amount of medicine given by the doctor or taken by the patient at a given period. Dosage is the regimen prescribed by the doctor about how many days and how many times per day the drug is to be taken in specified dose by the patient. The dose is expressed in mg for tablets or gm, micro gm sometimes, ml for syrups or drops for kids syrups. The dose is not fixed for a drug for all conditions, and it changes according to the condition or a disease. It also changes on the age of the patient.

Gentamicin sulfate Sulfate Injection, USP is administered by intravenous infusion only after dilution in a 50 or 100 mL ADD-Vantage Flexible Diluent Container of 5% Dextrose Injection, USP or 0.9% Sodium Chloride Injection, USP.

The patient’s pretreatment body weight should be obtained for calculation of correct dosage. The dosage of aminoglycosides in obese patients should be based on an estimate of the lean body mass. It is desirable to limit the duration of treatment with aminoglycosides to short term.

Patients with Normal Renal Function

Adults: The recommended dosage of Gentamicin sulfate sulfate for patients with serious infections and normal renal function is 3 mg/kg/day, administered in three equal doses every eight hours (Table 3).

For patients with life-threatening infections, dosages up to 5 mg/kg/day may be administered in three or four equal doses. The dosage should be reduced to 3 mg/kg/day as soon as clinically indicated (Table 3).

It is desirable to measure both peak and trough serum concentrations of Gentamicin sulfate to determine the adequacy and safety of the dosage. When such measurements are feasible, they should be carried out periodically during therapy to assure adequate but not excessive drug levels. When monitoring peak concentrations after intravenous administration, dosage should be adjusted so that prolonged levels above 12 mcg/mL are avoided. When monitoring trough concentrations (just prior to the next dose), dosage should be adjusted so that levels above 2 mcg/mL are avoided. Determination of the adequacy of a serum level for a particular patient must take into consideration the susceptibility of the causative organism, the severity of the infection, and the status of the patient’s host-defense mechanisms. In patients with extensive burns, altered pharmacokinetics may result in reduced serum concentrations of aminoglycosides. In such patients treated with Gentamicin sulfate, measurement of serum concentrations is recommended as a basis for dosage adjustment.

Table 3 Dosage Schedule Guide For Adults With Normal Renal Function
* The dosage of aminoglycosides in obese patients should be based on an estimate of the lean body mass.

** For q6h schedules, dosage should be recalculated.

(Dosage at Eight-Hour Intervals)

Patient’s

Weight*

Usual Dose

for Serious Infections

Dose for Life-Threatening

Infections (Reduce as Soon as Clinically Indicated)

kg

(lb)

1 mg/kg q8h

(3 mg/kg/day)

1.7 mg/kg q8h**

(5 mg/kg/day)

mg/dose

q8h

mg/dose

q8h

40

(88)

40

66

45

(99)

45

75

50

(110)

50

83

55

(121)

55

91

60

(132)

60

100

65

(143)

65

108

70

(154)

70

116

75

(165)

75

125

80

(176)

80

133

85

(187)

85

141

90

(198)

90

150

95

(209)

95

158

100

(220)

100

166

NOTE: For further information concerning the use of Gentamicin sulfate in infants and children, see pediatric Gentamicin sulfate sulfate injection product information.

The usual duration of treatment for all patients is seven to ten days. In difficult and complicated infections, a longer course of therapy may be necessary. In such cases monitoring of renal, auditory, and vestibular functions is recommended, since toxicity is more apt to occur with treatment extended for more than ten days. Dosage should be reduced if clinically indicated.

For

Intravenous Administration

The intravenous administration of Gentamicin sulfate may be particularly useful for treating patients with bacterial septicemia or those in shock. It may also be the preferred route of administration for some patients with congestive heart failure, hematologic disorders, severe burns, or those with reduced muscle mass. For intermittent intravenous administration in adults, a single dose of Gentamicin sulfate sulfate may be diluted in 50 or 100 mL of sterile 0.9% Sodium Chloride Injection, USP or in a sterile solution of 5% Dextrose Injection, USP. The solution may be infused over a period of one-half to two hours.

Gentamicin sulfate sulfate should not be physically premixed with other drugs, but should be administered separately in accordance with the recommended route of administration and dosage schedule.

Patients with Impaired Renal Function

Dosage must be adjusted in patients with impaired renal function to assure therapeutically adequate, but not excessive blood levels. Whenever possible, serum concentrations of Gentamicin sulfate should be monitored. One method of dosage adjustment is to increase the interval between administration of the usual doses. Since the serum creatinine concentration has a high correlation with the serum half-life of Gentamicin sulfate, this laboratory test may provide guidance for adjustment of the interval between doses. The interval between doses (in hours) may be approximated by multiplying the serum creatinine level (mg/100 mL) by 8. For example, a patient weighing 60 kg with a serum creatinine level of 2.0 mg/100 mL could be given 60 mg (1 mg/kg) every 16 hours (2x8).

In patients with serious systemic infections and renal impairment, it may be desirable to administer the antibiotic more frequently but in reduced dosage. In such patients, serum concentrations of Gentamicin sulfate should be measured so that adequate, but not excessive levels result. A peak and trough concentration measured intermittently during therapy will provide optimal guidance for adjusting dosage. After the usual initial dose, a rough guide for determining reduced dosage at eight-hour intervals is to divide the normally recommended dose by the serum creatinine level (Table 4). For example, after an initial dose of 60 mg (1 mg/kg), a patient weighing 60 kg with a serum creatinine level of 2.0 mg/100 mL could be given 30 mg every eight hours (60 ÷ 2). It should be noted that the status of renal function may be changing over the course of the infectious process.

It is important to recognize that deteriorating renal function may require a greater reduction in dosage than that specified in the above guidelines for patients with stable renal impairment.

Table 4 Dosage Adjustment Guide for Patients with Renal Impairment

(Dosage at Eight-Hour Intervals After the Usual Initial Dose)

Serum

Creatinine

(mg%)

Approximate Creatinine

Clearance Rate

(mL/min/1.73M2)

Percent of Usual Doses

Shown in Table 3

≤1.0

>100

100

1.1 — 1.3

70 —100

80

1.4 — 1.6

55 — 70

65

1.7 — 1.9

45 — 55

55

2.0 — 2.2

40 — 45

50

2.3 — 2.5

35 — 40

40

2.6 — 3.0

30 — 35

35

3.1 — 3.5

25 — 30

30

3.6 — 4.0

20 — 25

25

4.1 — 5.1

15 — 20

20

5.2 — 6.6

10 — 15

15

6.7 — 8.0

<10

10

In adults with renal failure undergoing hemodialysis, the amount of Gentamicin sulfate removed from the blood may vary depending upon several factors including the dialysis method used. An eight-hour hemodialysis may reduce serum concentrations of Gentamicin sulfate by approximately 50%. The recommended dose at the end of each dialysis period is 1 to 1.7 mg/kg depending upon the severity of infection.

The above dosage schedules are not intended as rigid recommendations but are provided as guides to dosage when the measurement of Gentamicin sulfate serum levels is not feasible.

A variety of methods are available to measure Gentamicin sulfate concentrations in body fluids; these include microbiologic, enzymatic and radioimmunoassay techniques.

Parenteral drug products should be inspected visually for particulate matter and discoloration prior to administration, whenever solution and container permit.

What other drugs will affect Gentamicin sulfate?

Other drugs, especially those that affect the kidneys, can interact with Gentamicin sulfate resulting in dangerous side effects and/or decreased effectiveness. Do not take any other prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including vitamins, minerals, and herbal products, without first talking to your doctor during treatment with Gentamicin sulfate.

Gentamicin sulfate interactions

Interactions are the effects that happen when the drug is taken along with the food or when taken with other medications. Suppose if you are taking a drug Gentamicin sulfate, it may have interactions with specific foods and specific medications. It will not interact with all foods and medications. The interactions vary from drug to drug. You need to be aware of interactions of the medicine you take. Most medications may interact with alcohol, tobacco, so be cautious.
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The effects of some drugs can change if you take other drugs or herbal products at the same time. This can increase your risk for serious side effects or may cause your medications not to work correctly. These drug interactions are possible, but do not always occur. Your doctor or pharmacist can often prevent or manage interactions by changing how you use your medications or by close monitoring.

To help your doctor and pharmacist give you the best care, be sure to tell your doctor and pharmacist about all the products you use (including prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs, and herbal products) before starting treatment with this product. While using this product, do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any other medicines you are using without your doctor's approval.

Some products that may interact with this drug include: aminoglycoside antibiotics given by injection (such as amikacin, Gentamicin sulfate, tobramycin).

This document does not contain all possible drug interactions. Keep a list of all the products you use. Share this list with your doctor and pharmacist to lessen your risk for serious medication problems.

Dosage of Miconazole nitrate in details

The dose of a drug and dosage of the drug are two different terminologies. Dose is defined as the quantity or amount of medicine given by the doctor or taken by the patient at a given period. Dosage is the regimen prescribed by the doctor about how many days and how many times per day the drug is to be taken in specified dose by the patient. The dose is expressed in mg for tablets or gm, micro gm sometimes, ml for syrups or drops for kids syrups. The dose is not fixed for a drug for all conditions, and it changes according to the condition or a disease. It also changes on the age of the patient.
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Miconazole nitrate Dosage

Generic name: miconazole nitrate

Dosage form: Cream

See also:

The information at Drugs.com is not a substitute for medical advice. Always consult your doctor or pharmacist.

Sufficient Miconazole nitrate Cream should be applied to cover affected areas twice daily (morning and evening) in patients with tinea pedis, tinea cruris, tinea corporis, and cutaneous candidiasis, and once daily in patients with tinea versicolor. If Miconazole nitrate Cream is used in intertriginous areas, it should be applied sparingly and smoothed in well to avoid maceration effects.

Early relief of symptoms (2 to 3 days) is experienced by the majority of patients and clinical improvement may be seen fairly soon after treatment is begun; however, Candida infections and tinea cruris and corporis should be treated for two weeks and tinea pedis for one month in order to reduce the possibility of recurrence. If a patient shows no clinical improvement after a month of treatment, the diagnosis should be redetermined. Patients with tinea versicolor usually exhibit clinical and mycological clearing after two weeks of treatment.

More about Miconazole nitrate (miconazole topical)

Consumer resources

Professional resources

Other formulations

Related treatment guides

What other drugs will affect Miconazole nitrate?

Avoid using other topicals at the same time unless your doctor approves. Other skin medications may affect the absorption or effectiveness of miconazole topical.

Miconazole nitrate interactions

Interactions are the effects that happen when the drug is taken along with the food or when taken with other medications. Suppose if you are taking a drug Miconazole nitrate, it may have interactions with specific foods and specific medications. It will not interact with all foods and medications. The interactions vary from drug to drug. You need to be aware of interactions of the medicine you take. Most medications may interact with alcohol, tobacco, so be cautious.

Oral anticoagulants, sulfonylurea hypoglycemics, phenytoin, carbamazepine, astemizole, cisapride & terfenadine.

References

  1. DailyMed. "MICONAZOLE: DailyMed provides trustworthy information about marketed drugs in the United States. DailyMed is the official provider of FDA label information (package inserts).". https://dailymed.nlm.nih.gov/dailyme... (accessed September 17, 2018).
  2. DailyMed. "GENTAMICIN SULFATE: DailyMed provides trustworthy information about marketed drugs in the United States. DailyMed is the official provider of FDA label information (package inserts).". https://dailymed.nlm.nih.gov/dailyme... (accessed September 17, 2018).
  3. DailyMed. "BETAMETHASONE: DailyMed provides trustworthy information about marketed drugs in the United States. DailyMed is the official provider of FDA label information (package inserts).". https://dailymed.nlm.nih.gov/dailyme... (accessed September 17, 2018).

Reviews

The results of a survey conducted on ndrugs.com for Betamethasone valerate/Gentamicin sulfate/miconazole nitrate are given in detail below. The results of the survey conducted are based on the impressions and views of the website users and consumers taking Betamethasone valerate/Gentamicin sulfate/miconazole nitrate. We implore you to kindly base your medical condition or therapeutic choices on the result or test conducted by a physician or licensed medical practitioners.

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1 consumer reported doses

What doses of Betamethasone valerate/Gentamicin sulfate/miconazole nitrate drug you have used?
The drug can be in various doses. Most anti-diabetic, anti-hypertensive drugs, pain killers, or antibiotics are in different low and high doses and prescribed by the doctors depending on the severity and demand of the condition suffered by the patient. In our reports, ndrugs.com website users used these doses of Betamethasone valerate/Gentamicin sulfate/miconazole nitrate drug in following percentages. Very few drugs come in a fixed dose or a single dose. Common conditions, like fever, have almost the same doses, e.g., [acetaminophen, 500mg] of drug used by the patient, even though it is available in various doses.
Users%
1-5mg1
100.0%


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