D-panthenol/niacinamide/vitamin A/vitamin B1/vitamin B2/vitamin B6/vitamin C/vitamin D3/vitamin E Uses

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Consists of D-panthenol, niacinamide, vitamin A, vitamin B1, vitamin B2, vitamin B6, vitamin C, vitamin D3, vitamin E

Uses of D-panthenol in details

There are specific as well as general uses of a drug or medicine. A medicine can be used to prevent a disease, treat a disease over a period or cure a disease. It can also be used to treat the particular symptom of the disease. The drug use depends on the form the patient takes it. It may be more useful in injection form or sometimes in tablet form. The drug can be used for a single troubling symptom or a life-threatening condition. While some medications can be stopped after few days, some drugs need to be continued for prolonged period to get the benefit from it.
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D-Panthenol is a form of Vitamin B5 (pantothenic acid). It is used for treating deficiency of Vitamin B5 in the body. Pantothenic acid is also used alone or in combination with other vitamins for a wide variety of uses. It is also used as an ingredient in skin and hair products, for treating dandruff, gray hair, baldness, treating acne; enhancing immune function; improving athletic performance; tongue infections; headache; insomnia; nerve pain (neuralgia); irritability; allergies; progressive weakness and loss of muscle mass (muscular dystrophy); hyperactivity; carpal tunnel syndrome (numbness, tingling, weakness, and other problems in your hand), depression, chronic fatigue syndrome; congenital hyperthyroidism(overactive thyroid gland from birth), attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHA), celiac disease (autoimmune disorder related to gluten ingestion).

D-panthenol side effects

Allergic reaction

What is Niacinamide?

An indication is a term used for the list of condition or symptom or illness for which the medicine is prescribed or used by the patient. For example, acetaminophen or paracetamol is used for fever by the patient, or the doctor prescribes it for a headache or body pains. Now fever, headache and body pains are the indications of paracetamol. A patient should be aware of the indications of medications used for common conditions because they can be taken over the counter in the pharmacy meaning without prescription by the Physician.

Treating acne.

Niacinamide is a vitamin B supplement. Exactly how Niacinamide works is unknown.

How should I use Niacinamide?

Use Niacinamide as directed by your doctor. Check the label on the medicine for exact dosing instructions.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Niacinamide.

Uses of Niacinamide in details

There are specific as well as general uses of a drug or medicine. A medicine can be used to prevent a disease, treat a disease over a period or cure a disease. It can also be used to treat the particular symptom of the disease. The drug use depends on the form the patient takes it. It may be more useful in injection form or sometimes in tablet form. The drug can be used for a single troubling symptom or a life-threatening condition. While some medications can be stopped after few days, some drugs need to be continued for prolonged period to get the benefit from it.
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To treat Hartnup disease (light sensitive skin rashes), inflammatory skin disease, vitamin deficiency, anxiety and Alzheimer’s disease (disorder that causes mental confusion and forgetfulness). It is also used in combination with intravenous vitamin C therapy for cancer.

Niacinamide description

Niacinamide, also called as nicotinamide (vitamin B3), is prescribed for the treatment of niacin deficiency disorders including pellagra. Niacinamide should not be used for treatment of hyperlipidemia.

Niacinamide dosage

Niacinamide Dosage

Applies to the following strengths: 100 mg; 500 mg

Usual Adult Dose for:

Usual Pediatric Dose for:

Additional dosage information:

Usual Adult Dose for Niacin Deficiency

Recommended Daily Allowances (RDA):

Males: 19 mg orally each day

Females: 13 mg orally each day

Initial dose: 100 mg orally 3 times a day, with or after meals

Maintenance dose: 100 to 500 mg orally up to 3 times a day, with or after meals

Niacinamide has toxic potential at adult doses in excess of 3 g/day.

Niacinamide may also be administered parenterally as a component of injectable multivitamin additives contained in parenteral nutrition products. All existing parenteral vitamin products for adults contain 40 mg/vial, which is the dose recommended by the American Medical Association/Nutrition Advisory Group for patients 11 years and older requiring parenteral vitamins.

Usual Adult Dose for Pemphigus

Recommended Daily Allowances (RDA):

Males: 19 mg orally each day

Females: 13 mg orally each day

Initial dose: 100 mg orally 3 times a day, with or after meals

Maintenance dose: 100 to 500 mg orally up to 3 times a day, with or after meals

Niacinamide has toxic potential at adult doses in excess of 3 g/day.

Niacinamide may also be administered parenterally as a component of injectable multivitamin additives contained in parenteral nutrition products. All existing parenteral vitamin products for adults contain 40 mg/vial, which is the dose recommended by the American Medical Association/Nutrition Advisory Group for patients 11 years and older requiring parenteral vitamins.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Niacin Deficiency

Recommended Daily Allowances (RDA):

0 to 6 months: 5 mg orally each day

6 months to 1 year: 6 mg orally each day

1 to 3 years: 9 mg orally each day

4 to 6 years: 12 mg orally each day

7 to 10 years: 13 mg orally each day

Males:

11 to 14 years: 17 mg orally each day

15 to 18 years: 20 mg orally each day

19 to 50 years: 19 mg orally each day

Females:

11 to 50 years: 13 mg orally each day

Niacinamide may also be administered parenterally as a component of injectable multivitamin additives contained in parenteral nutrition products. All existing parenteral vitamin products for children contain 17 mg/vial, which is the dose recommended by the American Medical Association/Nutrition Advisory Group for patients under 11 years of age.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Pemphigus

Recommended Daily Allowances (RDA):

0 to 6 months: 5 mg orally each day

6 months to 1 year: 6 mg orally each day

1 to 3 years: 9 mg orally each day

4 to 6 years: 12 mg orally each day

7 to 10 years: 13 mg orally each day

Males:

11 to 14 years: 17 mg orally each day

15 to 18 years: 20 mg orally each day

19 to 50 years: 19 mg orally each day

Females:

11 to 50 years: 13 mg orally each day

Niacinamide may also be administered parenterally as a component of injectable multivitamin additives contained in parenteral nutrition products. All existing parenteral vitamin products for children contain 17 mg/vial, which is the dose recommended by the American Medical Association/Nutrition Advisory Group for patients under 11 years of age.

Renal Dose Adjustments

Data not available

Liver Dose Adjustments

Because niacinamide is primarily metabolized by the liver and because of the risk of hepatotoxicity, niacinamide in not recommended in patients with liver dysfunction.

Dialysis

Data not available

Other Comments

Taking niacinamide with food may reduce stomach upset.

Niacinamide should not be taken with hot drinks.

Further information

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

More about niacinamide

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Niacinamide side effects

See also:
What are the possible side effects of Niacinamide?

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Applies to niacinamide: tablets

Check with your doctor if any of these most COMMON side effects persist or become bothersome:

Diarrhea; dizziness; headache; itching; nausea; stomach upset; temporary feeling of warmth or flushing of the skin.

Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur while taking niacinamide:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); black, tarry, or bloody stools; changes in vision; dark urine; decreased urination; fast or irregular heartbeat; loss of appetite; muscle pain or weakness; numbness or persistent tingling of the skin; persistent nausea, vomiting, or general "unwell" feeling; severe or prolonged flushing of the skin; stomach pain; swelling of the hands, legs, or feet; vomit that looks like coffee grounds; yellowing of the skin or eyes.

What is the most important information I should know about Niacinamide?

What is Vitamin A?

Vitamins are compounds that you must have for growth and health. They are needed in small amounts only and are usually available in the foods that you eat. Vitamin A is needed for night vision and for growth of skin, bones, and male and female reproductive organs. In pregnant women vitamin A is necessary for the growth of a healthy fetus.

Lack of vitamin A may lead to a rare condition called night blindness (problems seeing in the dark), as well as dry eyes, eye infections, skin problems, and slowed growth. Your health care professional may treat these problems by prescribing vitamin A for you.

Some conditions may increase your need for vitamin A. These include:

In addition, infants receiving unfortified formula may need vitamin A supplements.

Vitamin A absorption will be decreased in any condition in which fat is poorly absorbed.

Increased need for vitamin A should be determined by your health care professional.

Claims that vitamin A is effective for treatment of conditions such as acne or lung diseases, or for treatment of eye problems, wounds, or dry or wrinkled skin not caused by lack of vitamin A have not been proven. Although vitamin A is being used to prevent certain types of cancer, some experts feel there is not enough information to show that this is effective, particularly in well-nourished individuals.

Injectable vitamin A is given by or under the supervision of a health care professional. Other forms of vitamin A are available without a prescription.

Vitamin A indications

An indication is a term used for the list of condition or symptom or illness for which the medicine is prescribed or used by the patient. For example, acetaminophen or paracetamol is used for fever by the patient, or the doctor prescribes it for a headache or body pains. Now fever, headache and body pains are the indications of paracetamol. A patient should be aware of the indications of medications used for common conditions because they can be taken over the counter in the pharmacy meaning without prescription by the Physician.
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Vitamin A injection is effective for the treatment of vitamin A deficiency.

The parenteral administration is indicated when the oral administration is not feasible as in anorexia, nausea, vomiting, pre- and postoperative conditions, or it is not available as in the "Malabsorption Syndrome" with accompanying steatorrhea.

Pediatric Use: Vitamin A treatment for deficiency states has been recognized as an especially effective and important therapy in the pediatric population.

Vitamin A supplementation for deficiency states in this population has been addressed by the Committee on Clinical Practice Issues of the American Society for Clinical Nutrition, by the American Society for

Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, and by the World Health Organization.

Uses of Vitamin A in details

There are specific as well as general uses of a drug or medicine. A medicine can be used to prevent a disease, treat a disease over a period or cure a disease. It can also be used to treat the particular symptom of the disease. The drug use depends on the form the patient takes it. It may be more useful in injection form or sometimes in tablet form. The drug can be used for a single troubling symptom or a life-threatening condition. While some medications can be stopped after few days, some drugs need to be continued for prolonged period to get the benefit from it.

Vitamin A is used to prevent or treat low levels of the vitamin in people who do not get enough of it from their diets. Most people who eat a normal diet do not need extra vitamin A. However, some conditions (such as protein deficiency, diabetes, hyperthyroidism, liver/pancreas problems) can cause low levels of vitamin A. Vitamin A plays an important role in the body. It is needed for growth and bone development and to maintain the health of the skin and eyesight. Low levels of vitamin A may cause vision problems (such as night blindness) and permanent eye damage.

How to use Vitamin A

Take this vitamin by mouth with or without food, usually once daily. Follow all directions on the product package, or take as directed by your doctor. If you are uncertain about any of the information, consult your doctor or pharmacist.

If you are using the liquid form of this medication, carefully measure the dose using a special measuring device/spoon. Do not use a household spoon because you may not get the correct dose.

Dosage is based on your age, medical condition, and response to treatment.

Use this vitamin regularly to get the most benefit from it. To help you remember, take it at the same time each day. Do not increase your dose or use this vitamin more often than recommended. Your condition will not improve any faster, and your risk of side effects will increase.

Tell your doctor if your condition persists or worsens. If you think you may have a serious medical problem, seek immediate medical attention.

Vitamin A description

Vitamin A (Glucoenergan, Reactivan) is a stimulant which was developed in the 1960s as an appetite suppressant, but was later withdrawn for this application due to problems with dependence and abuse. It is around half the potency of dexamphetamine, and is prescribed at a dose of 10-60mg, although abusers of the drug tend to rapidly develop tolerance and escalate their dose. Reactivan is still rarely used for treating depressive day-time fatigue, lack of concentration and lethargy, particularly in individuals who have chronic medical conditions, as its favourable safety profile makes it the most suitable drug in some cases.

Vitamin A dosage

Vitamin A Dosage

Generic name: VITAMIN A PALMITATE 15mg in 1mL

Dosage form: injection, solution

The information at Drugs.com is not a substitute for medical advice. Always consult your doctor or pharmacist.

For intramuscular use.

I.
Adults

100,000 Units daily for three days followed by 50,000 Units daily for two weeks.

II.
Pediatric patients 1 to 8 years old

17,500 to 35,000 Units daily for 10 days.

III.
Infants

7,500 to 15,000 Units daily for 10 days.

Follow-up therapy with an oral therapeutic multivitamin preparation, containing 10,000 to 20,000 Units vitamin A for adults and for pediatric patients over 8 years old, and 5,000 to 10,000 Units for infants and other pediatric patients under 8 years old, is recommended daily for two months. Low birth-weight infants may require additional vitamin A though the exact dosing in these pediatric patients has not been established. In malabsorption, the parenteral route must be used for an equivalent preparation.

Poor dietary habits should be corrected and an abundant and well-balanced dietary intake should be prescribed.

More about Vitamin A (vitamin a)

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Vitamin A interactions

See also:
What other drugs will affect Vitamin A?

The effects of some drugs can change if you take other drugs or herbal products at the same time. This can increase your risk for serious side effects or may cause your medications not to work correctly. These drug interactions are possible, but do not always occur. Your doctor or pharmacist can often prevent or manage interactions by changing how you use your medications or by close monitoring.

To help your doctor and pharmacist give you the best care, be sure to tell your doctor and pharmacist about all the products you use (including prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs, and herbal products) before starting treatment with this product. While using this product, do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any other medicines you are using without your doctor's approval.

Some products that may interact with this vitamin include: acitretin, alitretinoin, bexarotene, cholestyramine, isotretinoin, tretinoin, other products that contain vitamin A (such as multivitamins), warfarin.

Avoid taking vitamin A at the same time as you take neomycin, orlistat, and mineral oil. If you take any of these medications, separate your doses from your dose of vitamin A by at least 2 hours.

This document does not contain all possible drug interactions. Keep a list of all the products you use. Share this list with your doctor and pharmacist to lessen your risk for serious medication problems.

Vitamin A side effects

See also:
What are the possible side effects of Vitamin A?

This vitamin usually has no side effects when used in recommended doses. If you have any unusual effects, contact your doctor or pharmacist promptly.

A very serious allergic reaction to this vitamin is rare. However, seek immediate medical attention if you notice any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, including: rash, itching/swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat), severe dizziness, trouble breathing.

This is not a complete list of possible side effects. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist.

In the US -

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or at www.fda.gov/medwatch.

In Canada - Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to Health Canada at 1-866-234-2345.

Vitamin A contraindications

See also:
What is the most important information I should know about Vitamin A?

The intravenous administration. Hypervitaminosis A. Sensitivity to any of the ingredients in this preparation. Use in Pregnancy: Safety of amounts exceeding 6,000 Units of vitamin A daily during pregnancy has not been established at this time. The use of vitamin A in excess of the recommended dietary allowance may cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. Animal reproduction studies have shown fetal abnormalities associated with overdosage in several species. Malformations of the central nervous system, the eye, the palate, and the urogenital tract are recorded. Vitamin A in excess of the recommended dietary allowance is contraindicated in women who are or may become pregnant. If vitamin A is used during pregnancy, or if the patient becomes pregnant while taking vitamin A, the patient should be apprised of the potential hazard to the fetus.

What is Vitamin B1?

Thiamine is vitamin B1. Thiamine is found in foods such as cereals, whole grains, meat, nuts, beans, and peas. Thiamine is important in the breakdown of carbohydrates from foods into products needed by the body.

Thiamine is used to treat or prevent vitamin B1 deficiency. Thiamine injection is used to treat beriberi, a serious condition caused by prolonged lack of vitamin B1.

Thiamine taken by mouth (oral) is available without a prescription. Injectable thiamine must be given by a healthcare professional.

Thiamine may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

Vitamin B1 indications

An indication is a term used for the list of condition or symptom or illness for which the medicine is prescribed or used by the patient. For example, acetaminophen or paracetamol is used for fever by the patient, or the doctor prescribes it for a headache or body pains. Now fever, headache and body pains are the indications of paracetamol. A patient should be aware of the indications of medications used for common conditions because they can be taken over the counter in the pharmacy meaning without prescription by the Physician.

Vitamin B1 deficiency

Vitamin B1 description

3-((4-Amino-2-methyl-5-pyrimidinyl)methyl)-5-(2- hydroxyethyl)-4-methylthiazolium chloride.

Vitamin B1 interactions

Interactions for vitamin B1

Loop Diuretics,

Oral Contraceptives, Stavudine, Tricyclic Antidepressants

Vitamin B1 side effects

Applies to thiamine: capsule, solution, tablet, tablet enteric coated

As well as its needed effects, thiamine (the active ingredient contained in Vitamin B1) may cause unwanted side effects that require medical attention.

Major Side Effects

If any of the following side effects occur while taking thiamine, check with your doctor immediately:

Rare - Soon after receiving injection only

Vitamin B1 contraindications

Contraindications for vitamin B1

Hypersensitivity to vitamin B1 or any component of a product containing vitamin B1.

What is Vitamin B2?

Riboflavin is vitamin B2. Vitamins are naturally occurring substances necessary for many processes in the body. Riboflavin is important in the maintenance of many tissues of the body.

Riboflavin is used to prevent and to treat deficiencies of riboflavin.

Riboflavin may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

Vitamin B2 indications

An indication is a term used for the list of condition or symptom or illness for which the medicine is prescribed or used by the patient. For example, acetaminophen or paracetamol is used for fever by the patient, or the doctor prescribes it for a headache or body pains. Now fever, headache and body pains are the indications of paracetamol. A patient should be aware of the indications of medications used for common conditions because they can be taken over the counter in the pharmacy meaning without prescription by the Physician.

vitamin b2 deficiency

Uses of Vitamin B2 in details

There are specific as well as general uses of a drug or medicine. A medicine can be used to prevent a disease, treat a disease over a period or cure a disease. It can also be used to treat the particular symptom of the disease. The drug use depends on the form the patient takes it. It may be more useful in injection form or sometimes in tablet form. The drug can be used for a single troubling symptom or a life-threatening condition. While some medications can be stopped after few days, some drugs need to be continued for prolonged period to get the benefit from it.

Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) supplementation is used to prevent and treat riboflavin deficiency. Vitamin B2 may prevent migraine headaches at high doses and be useful for prevention of eye conditions such as cataract, glaucoma and tired eyes (fatigue). Vitamin B2 is also used for boosting of immune system, and maintenance of healthy hair, skin, nails and mucous membranes.

Vitamin B2 description

Nutritional factor found in milk, eggs, malted barley, liver, kidney, heart, and leafy vegetables. The richest natural source is yeast. It occurs in the free form only in the retina of the eye, in whey, and in urine; its principal forms in tissues and cells are as flavin mononucleotide and flavin-adenine dinucleotide.

Vitamin B2 interactions

Interactions for vitamin B2

Alcohol - impairs the intestinal absorption of riboflavi

Antidepressants (tricyclics or phenothiazines) - requirements for riboflavin may be increased in patients receiving these medications

Probenecid - concurrent use decreases gastrointestinal absorption of riboflavin; requirements for riboflavin may be increased in patients receiving probenecid.

Vitamin B2 side effects

Genitourinary

Yellow-orange discoloration of urine.

Vitamin B2 contraindications

None well documented.

What is Vitamin B6?

Pyridoxine is vitamin B6. Vitamins occur naturally in foods such as meat, poultry, nuts, whole grains, bananas, and avocados. Vitamin B6 is important for many processes in the body.

Pyridoxine is used to treat or prevent vitamin B6 deficiency. It is also used to treat a certain type of anemia (lack of red blood cells). Pyridoxine injection is also used to treat some types of seizure in babies.

Pyridoxine taken by mouth (oral) is available without a prescription. Injectable pyridoxine must be given by a healthcare professional.

Pyridoxine may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

Vitamin B6 indications

An indication is a term used for the list of condition or symptom or illness for which the medicine is prescribed or used by the patient. For example, acetaminophen or paracetamol is used for fever by the patient, or the doctor prescribes it for a headache or body pains. Now fever, headache and body pains are the indications of paracetamol. A patient should be aware of the indications of medications used for common conditions because they can be taken over the counter in the pharmacy meaning without prescription by the Physician.

* Sideroblastic anaemia

* Treatment and prophylaxis of vitamin B6 deficiency states

How should I use Vitamin B6?

Follow all directions on your prescription label. Do not use this medicine in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

Pyridoxine tablets are taken by mouth. Injectable pyridoxine is injected into a muscle or into a vein through an IV. You may be shown how to use injections at home. Do not self-inject this medicine if you do not understand how to give the injection and properly dispose of used needles, IV tubing, and other items used to inject the medicine.

The recommended dietary allowance of pyridoxine increases with age. Follow your healthcare provider's instructions. You may also consult the Office of Dietary Supplements of the National Institutes of Health, or the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Nutrient Database (formerly "Recommended Daily Allowances") listings for more information.

Pyridoxine is only part of a complete program of treatment that may also include a special diet. It is very important to follow the diet plan created for you by your doctor or nutrition counselor. You should become very familiar with the list of foods you should eat or avoid to help control your condition.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

Uses of Vitamin B6 in details

There are specific as well as general uses of a drug or medicine. A medicine can be used to prevent a disease, treat a disease over a period or cure a disease. It can also be used to treat the particular symptom of the disease. The drug use depends on the form the patient takes it. It may be more useful in injection form or sometimes in tablet form. The drug can be used for a single troubling symptom or a life-threatening condition. While some medications can be stopped after few days, some drugs need to be continued for prolonged period to get the benefit from it.

It is used for the treatment and prevention of vitamin B6 deficiency. It is important for the breakdown of protein, fats, and carbohydrates from foods.

Vitamin B6 description

The 4-methanol form of vitamin B 6 which is converted to pyridoxal phosphate which is a coenzyme for synthesis of amino acids, neurotransmitters (serotonin, norepinephrine), sphingolipids, aminolevulinic acid. Although pyridoxine and Vitamin B 6 are still frequently used as synonyms, especially by medical researchers, this practice is erroneous and sometimes misleading (EE Snell; Ann NY Acad Sci, vol 585 pg 1, 1990).

Vitamin B6 interactions

Interactions for vitamin B6

Amiodarone: Concomitant use of vitamin B6 and amiodarone may enhance amiodarone-induced photosensitivity reactions. Doses of vitamin B6 greater than 5-10 milligrams/day should be avoided by those taking amiodarone Carbamazepine: Chronic use of carbamazepine may result in a significant decrease in plasma pyridoxal 5-phosphate levels Cycloserine: Cycloserine may react with pyridoxal 5-phosphate to form a metabolically inactive oxime, which may result in a functional vitamin B6 deficiency Ethionamide: The use of ethionamide may increase vitamin B6 requirements Fosphenytoin: High doses of vitamin B6 may lower plasma levels of phenytoin. Fosphenytoin is a prodrug of phenytoin Hydralazine: The use of hydralazine may increase vitamin B6 requirements Isoniazid: (isonicotinic acid, INH). Isoniazid reacts with pyridoxal 5-phosphate to form a metabolically inactive hydrazone, which may result in functional vitamin B6 deficiency Levodopa: Concomitant use of levodopa and vitamin B6 in doses of 5 milligrams or more daily may reverse the therapeutic effects of levodopa. Vitamin B6 does not reverse the therapeutic effects of levodopa if levodopa is taken concurrently with the levodopa decarboxylase inhibitor carbidopa. Levodopa is typically administered as a combination product with carbidopa

Oral contraceptives: The use of oral contraceptives may increase vitamin B6 requirements. This was more the case with the older oral contraceptive agents with high-dose estrogen/progestin. It appears to be less the case with the newer low-dose estrogen/progestin products Penicillamine: Penicillamine may react with pyridoxal 5-phosphate to form a metabolically inactive thiazolidine, which may result in a functional vitamin B6 deficiency Phenelzine: Phenelzine may react with pyridoxal 5-phosphate to yield a metabolically inactive hydrazone compound Phenobarbital: High doses of vitamin B6 may lower plasma levels of phenobarbital Phenytoin: High doses of vitamin B6 may lower plasma levels of phenytoin Theophylline: Theophylline may react with pyridoxal 5-phosphate leading to low plasma levels of the coenzyme. This may increase the risk of theophylline-induced seizures Valproic acid: Chronic use of valproic acid may result in a significant decrease in plasma pyridoxal 5-phosphate levels.

Vitamin B6 side effects

Applies to pyridoxine: capsule, injectable, solution, tablet, tablet enteric coated, tablet extended release

As well as its needed effects, pyridoxine (the active ingredient contained in Vitamin B6) may cause unwanted side effects that require medical attention.

Severity: Moderate

If any of the following side effects occur while taking pyridoxine, check with your doctor or nurse as soon as possible:

With large doses

Vitamin B6 contraindications

Contraindications for vitamin B6

Vitamin B6 is contraindicated in those hypersensitive to any component of a vitamin B6-containing product.

What is Vitamin C?

Ascorbic acid (vitamin C) occurs naturally in foods such as citrus fruit, tomatoes, potatoes, and leafy vegetables. Vitamin C is important for bones and connective tissues, muscles, and blood vessels. Vitamin C also helps the body absorb iron, which is needed for red blood cell production.

Ascorbic acid is used to treat and prevent vitamin C deficiency.

Ascorbic acid may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

Vitamin C indications

An indication is a term used for the list of condition or symptom or illness for which the medicine is prescribed or used by the patient. For example, acetaminophen or paracetamol is used for fever by the patient, or the doctor prescribes it for a headache or body pains. Now fever, headache and body pains are the indications of paracetamol. A patient should be aware of the indications of medications used for common conditions because they can be taken over the counter in the pharmacy meaning without prescription by the Physician.

For systemic use of Vitamin C: prevention and treatment of hypo- and avitaminosis of vitamin C; providing increased need for vitamin C during growth, pregnancy, lactation, with heavy loads, fatigue and during recovery after prolonged severe illness; in winter with an increased risk of infectious diseases.

For intravaginal use: chronic or recurrent vaginitis (bacterial vaginosis, nonspecific vaginitis) caused by the anaerobic flora (due to changes in pH of the vagina) in order to normalize disturbed vaginal microflora.

Uses of Vitamin C in details

There are specific as well as general uses of a drug or medicine. A medicine can be used to prevent a disease, treat a disease over a period or cure a disease. It can also be used to treat the particular symptom of the disease. The drug use depends on the form the patient takes it. It may be more useful in injection form or sometimes in tablet form. The drug can be used for a single troubling symptom or a life-threatening condition. While some medications can be stopped after few days, some drugs need to be continued for prolonged period to get the benefit from it.

Ascorbic acid (vitamin C) is used to prevent or treat low levels of vitamin C in people who do not get enough of the vitamin from their diets. Most people who eat a normal diet do not need extra ascorbic acid. Low levels of vitamin C can result in a condition called scurvy. Scurvy may cause symptoms such as rash, muscle weakness, joint pain, tiredness, or tooth loss.

Vitamin C plays an important role in the body. It is needed to maintain the health of skin, cartilage, teeth, bone, and blood vessels. It is also used to protect your body's cells from damage. It is known as an antioxidant.

OTHER USES: This section contains uses of this drug that are not listed in the approved professional labeling for the drug but that may be prescribed by your health care professional. Use this drug for a condition that is listed in this section only if it has been so prescribed by your health care professional.

This vitamin may also be used with other vitamins for a certain eye condition (macular degeneration).

How to use Vitamin C

Take this vitamin by mouth with or without food, usually 1 to 2 times daily. Follow all directions on the product package, or take as directed by your doctor.

If you are taking the extended-release capsules, swallow them whole. Do not crush or chew extended-release capsules or tablets. Doing so can release all of the drug at once, increasing the risk of side effects. Also, do not split extended-release tablets unless they have a score line and your doctor or pharmacist tells you to do so. Swallow the whole or split tablet without crushing or chewing. Take this product with a full glass of water (8 ounces/240 milliliters) unless your doctor directs you otherwise.

If you are taking the wafers or chewable tablets, chew them thoroughly and then swallow. If you are taking the lozenges, place the lozenge in your mouth and allow it to slowly dissolve.

If you are taking the powder, mix it thoroughly in the proper amount of liquid and stir well. Drink all of the liquid right away. Do not prepare a supply for future use. If you are using the liquid form of this vitamin, carefully measure the dose using a special measuring device/spoon. Do not use a household spoon because you may not get the correct dose.

Dosage is based on your medical condition and response to treatment.

Use this vitamin regularly to get the most benefit from it. To help you remember, take it at the same time(s) each day.

If you think you may have a serious medical problem, seek immediate medical attention.

Vitamin C description

A six carbon compound related to glucose. It is found naturally in citrus fruits and many vegetables. Ascorbic acid is an essential nutrient in human diets, and necessary to maintain connective tissue and bone. Its biologically active form, vitamin C, functions as a reducing agent and coenzyme in several metabolic pathways. Vitamin C is considered an antioxidant.

Vitamin C dosage

This medication administered orally, IM, IV, intravaginally.

For the prevention of deficiency conditions Vitamin C dose is 25-75 mg / day, for the treatment - 250 mg / day or more in divided doses.

For intravaginal used ascorbic acid drugs in appropriate dosage forms.

Vitamin C interactions

In an application with barbiturates, primidone increases the excretion of ascorbic acid in the urine.

With the simultaneous use of oral contraceptives reduces the concentration of ascorbic acid in blood plasma.

In an application of Vitamin C with iron preparations ascorbic acid, due to its regenerative properties, transforms ferric iron in the bivalent, which improves its absorption.

Ascorbic acid in high doses can decrease urine pH that while the application reduces the tubular reabsorption of amphetamine and tricyclic antidepressants.

With the simultaneous use of aspirin reduces the absorption of ascorbic acid by about a third.

Vitamin C in an application with warfarin may decrease effects of warfarin.

With the simultaneous application of ascorbic acid increases the excretion of iron in patients receiving deferoxamine. In the application of ascorbic acid at a dose of 500 mg / day possibly left ventricular dysfunction.

In an application with tetracycline is increased excretion of ascorbic acid in the urine.

There is a described case of reducing the concentration of fluphenazine in plasma in patients treated with ascorbic acid 500 mg 2 times / day.

May increase the concentration of ethinyl estradiol in the blood plasma in its simultaneous application in the oral contraceptives.

Vitamin C side effects

Applies to ascorbic acid: oral capsule, oral capsule extended release, oral capsule liquid filled, oral granule, oral liquid, oral lozenge/troche, oral powder, oral powder for solution, oral powder for suspension, oral solution, oral syrup, oral tablet, oral tablet chewable, oral tablet extended release, oral wafer

As well as its needed effects, ascorbic acid (the active ingredient contained in Vitamin C) may cause unwanted side effects that require medical attention.

Severity: Moderate

If any of the following side effects occur while taking ascorbic acid, check with your doctor or nurse as soon as possible:

Less common or rare: - with high doses

Minor Side Effects

Some ascorbic acid side effects may not need any medical attention. As your body gets used to the medicine these side effects may disappear. Your health care professional may be able to help you prevent or reduce these side effects, but do check with them if any of the following side effects continue, or if you are concerned about them:

Less common or rare: - with high doses

Vitamin C contraindications

AV-block II and III degree, sinoatrial block, SSS, bradycardia (HR < 40 bpm), hypotension (in case of myocardial infarction, systolic blood pressure less than 100 mm Hg), cardiogenic shock, congestive heart failure IIB-III stages, acute heart failure, Prinzmetal's angina, lactation, concomitant use of MAO inhibitors, hypersensitivity to atenolol.

What is Vitamin D3?

Cholecalciferol is a vitamin D3. Vitamin D is important for the absorption of calcium from the stomach and for the functioning of calcium in the body.

Cholecalciferol is used to treat or prevent many conditions caused by a lack of vitamin D, especially conditions of the skin or bones.

Cholecalciferol may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

Vitamin D3 indications

An indication is a term used for the list of condition or symptom or illness for which the medicine is prescribed or used by the patient. For example, acetaminophen or paracetamol is used for fever by the patient, or the doctor prescribes it for a headache or body pains. Now fever, headache and body pains are the indications of paracetamol. A patient should be aware of the indications of medications used for common conditions because they can be taken over the counter in the pharmacy meaning without prescription by the Physician.

Vitamin D3 has an important role in energize the intestinal absorption for calcium and phosphor, to regulate their metabolism and balance in blood. It helps bone calcification. Deficiency of vitamin D3 in the body causes deficiency of the calcium in the bone, weakness of its resistance and deformity.

Uses of Vitamin D3 in details

There are specific as well as general uses of a drug or medicine. A medicine can be used to prevent a disease, treat a disease over a period or cure a disease. It can also be used to treat the particular symptom of the disease. The drug use depends on the form the patient takes it. It may be more useful in injection form or sometimes in tablet form. The drug can be used for a single troubling symptom or a life-threatening condition. While some medications can be stopped after few days, some drugs need to be continued for prolonged period to get the benefit from it.

Vitamin D3 is used for the prevention and treatment of vitamin D deficiency. Vitamin D3 is important for absorption of calcium in the body. It is also used to prevent bone disorders such as osteomalacia and rickets.

Vitamin D3 description

Vitamin D3 (Vitamin D2) is a derivative of ergosterol formed by ultraviolet rays breaking of the C9-C10 bond. It differs from cholecalciferol in having a double bond between C22 and C23 and a methyl group at C24.

Vitamin D3 dosage

1 tab daily.

Vitamin D3 interactions

Interactions for vitamin D analogues (Vitamin D2, Vitamin D3, Calcitriol, and Calcidiol)

Cholestyramine

Cholestyramine has been reported to reduce intestinal absorption of fat soluble vitamins; as such it may impair intestinal absorption of any of vitamin D

Phenytoin/Phenobarbital

The coadministration of phenytoin or phenobarbital will not affect plasma concentrations of vitamin D, but may reduce endogenous plasma levels of calcitriol/ergocalcitriol by accelerating metabolism. Since blood level of calcitriol/ergocalcitriol will be reduced, higher doses of Rocaltrol may be necessary if these drugs are administered simultaneously

Thiazides

Thiazides are known to induce hypercalcemia by the reduction of calcium excretion in urine. Some reports have shown that the concomitant administration of thiazides with vitamin D causes hypercalcemia. Therefore, precaution should be taken when coadministration is necessary

Digitalis

Vitamin D dosage must be determined with care in patients undergoing treatment with digitalis, as hypercalcemia in such patients may precipitate cardiac arrhythmias

Ketoconazole

Ketoconazole may inhibit both synthetic and catabolic enzymes of vitamin D. Reductions in serum endogenous vitamin D concentrations have been observed following the administration of 300 mg/day to 1200 mg/day ketoconazole for a week to healthy men. However, in vivo drug interaction studies of ketoconazole with vitamin D have not been investigated

Corticosteroids

A relationship of functional antagonism exists between vitamin D analogues, which promote calcium absorption, and corticosteroids, which inhibit calcium absorption

Phosphate-Binding Agents

Since vitamin D also has an effect on phosphate transport in the intestine, kidneys and bones, the dosage of phosphate-binding agents must be adjusted in accordance with the serum phosphate concentration

Vitamin D

The coadministration of any of the vitamin D analogues should be avoided as this could create possible additive effects and hypercalcemia

Calcium Supplements

Uncontrolled intake of additional calcium-containing preparations should be avoided

Magnesium

Magnesium-containing preparations (eg, antacids) may cause hypermagnesemia and should therefore not be taken during therapy with vitamin D by patients on chronic renal dialysis.

Vitamin D3 side effects

Applies to cholecalciferol: oral capsule, oral capsule liquid filled, oral solution, oral tablet, oral tablet chewable, oral wafer

As well as its needed effects, cholecalciferol (the active ingredient contained in Vitamin D3) may cause unwanted side effects that require medical attention.

Major Side Effects

If any of the following side effects occur while taking cholecalciferol, check with your doctor immediately:

Incidence not known:

Vitamin D3 contraindications

Contraindications for vitamin D analogues (Vitamin D2, Vitamin D3, Calcitriol, and Calcidiol)

Vitamin D should not be given to patients with hypercalcemia or evidence of vitamin D toxicity. Use of vitamin D in patients with known hypersensitivity to vitamin D (or drugs of the same class) or any of the inactive ingredients is contraindicated.

What is Vitamin E?

Vitamin E is an antioxidant that occurs naturally in foods such as nuts, seeds, and leafy green vegetables. Vitamin E is a fat-soluble vitamin important for many processes in the body.

Vitamin E is used to treat or prevent vitamin E deficiency. People with certain diseases may need extra vitamin E.

Vitamin E may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

Vitamin E indications

An indication is a term used for the list of condition or symptom or illness for which the medicine is prescribed or used by the patient. For example, acetaminophen or paracetamol is used for fever by the patient, or the doctor prescribes it for a headache or body pains. Now fever, headache and body pains are the indications of paracetamol. A patient should be aware of the indications of medications used for common conditions because they can be taken over the counter in the pharmacy meaning without prescription by the Physician.

Oral

Vitamin E deficiency

Adult: 40-50 mg of d-α tocopherol daily.

Child: Neonate: 10 mg/kg once daily; 1 mth-18 yr: 2-10 mg/kg/day, up to 20 mg/kg.

Oral

Supplementation in cystic fibrosis

Adult: 100-200 mg daily of dl-α-tocoferil acetate or 67-135 mg daily of d-α-tocopherol.

Child: As α- tocopheryl acetate: 1 mth-1 yr 50 mg once daily; 1-12 yr 100 mg once daily; 12-18 yr 200 mg once daily. Dose to be adjusted as needed.

Oral

Abetalipoproteinaemia

Adult: 50-100 mg/kg daily of dl-α-tocoferil acetate or about 33-67 mg/kg daily of d-α-tocopherol.

Child: Neonate: 100 mg/kg once daily; 1 mth-18 yr: 50-100 mg/kg once daily.

Uses of Vitamin E in details

There are specific as well as general uses of a drug or medicine. A medicine can be used to prevent a disease, treat a disease over a period or cure a disease. It can also be used to treat the particular symptom of the disease. The drug use depends on the form the patient takes it. It may be more useful in injection form or sometimes in tablet form. The drug can be used for a single troubling symptom or a life-threatening condition. While some medications can be stopped after few days, some drugs need to be continued for prolonged period to get the benefit from it.

This supplement is used to prevent or treat a lack of vitamin E in the body. A low body level of vitamin E is rare. Most people who eat a normal diet do not need extra vitamin E. However, vitamin E supplements are used in premature newborns and in people who have problems absorbing enough vitamin E from their diets. Vitamin E is important in protecting your body's cells from damage. It is known as an antioxidant.

How to use Vitamin E

Take this product by mouth as directed. Follow all directions on the product package. If you are uncertain about any of the information, consult your doctor or pharmacist.

If you are using a liquid form of this product, carefully measure your dose using a medication-measuring device or spoon. Do not use a household spoon because you may not get the correct dose. If your liquid form is a suspension, shake the bottle well before each dose.

Dosage is based on your medical condition and response to treatment. Do not increase your dose or take it more often than recommended. Taking too much vitamin E may increase your risk of side effects.

High doses of vitamin E (400 units or more per day) may increase the chance of rare but very serious side effects. There is no proof that high doses of vitamin E help to prevent or treat heart disease. There is very little evidence that it helps prevent or treat Alzheimer's disease. In some people, taking these high doses may even be harmful. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist and discuss the risks and benefits before taking vitamin E supplements.

If your doctor prescribes this product for vitamin E deficiency, use it regularly to get the most benefit from it. To help you remember, take it at the same time each day. You should see improvement of symptoms such as numbness/tingling of the hands/feet and weakness. If your condition persists or worsens, or if you think you may have a serious medical problem, seek immediate medical attention.

Vitamin E description

A methylxanthine naturally occurring in some beverages and also used as a pharmacological agent. Vitamin E&

Vitamin E dosage

Vitamin E Dosage

Applies to the following strength(s): with mixed tocopherols 400 intl units; alpha 100 intl units; with mixed tocopherols 200 intl units; with mixed tocopherols 1000 intl units; 600 intl units; 400 intl units; 100 intl units; 15 intl units/0.3 mL; 200 intl units; 1000 intl units; alpha 1000 intl units; dl-alpha 400 intl units; d-alpha 200 intl units; d-alpha 400 intl units; dl-alpha 600 intl units; d-alpha tocopherol with tocopherols and tocotrienols

The information at Drugs.com is not a substitute for medical advice. Always consult your doctor or pharmacist.

Usual Adult Dose for:

Usual Pediatric Dose for:

Additional dosage information:

Usual Adult Dose for Vitamin E Deficiency

Treatment: 60 to 75 units orally once daily.

Prevention: 30 units orally once daily.

Usual Adult Dose for Tardive Dyskinesia

600 to 1600 units orally per day.

Usual Adult Dose for Sickle Cell Anemia

450 units orally per day.

Usual Adult Dose for Alzheimer's Disease

1000 units orally twice daily.

Usual Adult Dose for Dietary Supplement

Oral liquid formulation (Vitamin E): 200 units (10 mL) orally once daily.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Vitamin E Deficiency

1 unit/kg/day orally of water-miscible vitamin E.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Retinopathy Prophylaxis

Prevention of retinopathy of prematurity or Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) secondary to oxygen therapy: 15 to 30 units/kg/day to maintain plasma levels between 1.5 to 2 mcg/mL (may need as high as 100 units/kg/day). Note: AAP considers this use investigational and routine use is not recommended.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Cystic Fibrosis

100 to 400 units/day orally.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Dietary Supplement

Dosing: 1 unit vitamin E = 1 mg dl-alpha-tocopherol acetate.

Oral:

Adequate Intake (AI):

1 to less than 6 months: 4 units daily

6 to less than 12 months: 5 units daily

Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA):

1 to 3 years: 6 units daily

4 to 8 years: 7 units daily

9 to 13 years: 11 units daily

13 years and Older: 15 units daily

Renal Dose Adjustments

Data not available

Liver Dose Adjustments

Data not available

Precautions

Although no longer available in the U.S., vitamin E injectable administered intravenously to premature infants may result in a potentially fatal syndrome consisting of thrombocytopenia, hepatomegaly, splenomegaly, ascites, and renal, hepatic, and pulmonary dysfunction.

Oral administration of large doses (200 mg per day) of a hyperosmolar vitamin E preparation to low-birthweight infants has been associated with the development of necrotizing enterocolitis.

Dialysis

Data not available

Other Comments

The oral liquid formulation (Vitamin E [R]) is intended to enhance absorption in patients with conditions associated with malabsorption (e.g., Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis ) or for patients who have difficulty swallowing capsules.

The oral liquid formulation (Vitamin E [R]) may be taken directly or mixed with water or other beverage. It must be shaken well prior to each use and refrigerated after opening.

More about vitamin e

Consumer resources

Professional resources

Related treatment guides

Vitamin E interactions

See also:
What other drugs will affect Vitamin E?

Agents with Antiplatelet Properties (e.g., P2Y12 inhibitors, NSAIDs, SSRIs, etc.): Vitamin E (Systemic) may enhance the antiplatelet effect of Agents with Antiplatelet Properties. Monitor therapy

Anticoagulants: Vitamin E (Systemic) may enhance the anticoagulant effect of Anticoagulants. Monitor therapy

CycloSPORINE (Systemic): Vitamin E (Systemic) may decrease the serum concentration of CycloSPORINE (Systemic). Monitor therapy

Ibrutinib: Vitamin E (Systemic) may enhance the antiplatelet effect of Ibrutinib. Monitor therapy

Orlistat: May decrease the serum concentration of Vitamins (Fat Soluble). Management: Administer oral fat soluble vitamins at least 2 hours before or after the administration of orlistat. Similar precautions do not apply to parenterally administered fat soluble vitamins. Consider therapy modification

Tipranavir: May enhance the adverse/toxic effect of Vitamin E (Systemic). Management: Patients taking tipranavir oral solution are advised to avoid taking additional vitamin E, beyond the amounts contained in a multivitamin product. This interaction does not apply to tipranavir capsules. Consider therapy modification

Vitamin E side effects

See also:
What are the possible side effects of Vitamin E?

Applies to vitamin e: oral capsule, oral capsule liquid filled, oral liquid, oral powder for solution, oral solution, oral tablet, oral tablet chewable

In addition to its needed effects, some unwanted effects may be caused by vitamin e (the active ingredient contained in Vitamin E). In the event that any of these side effects do occur, they may require medical attention.

Severity: Moderate

If any of the following side effects occur while taking vitamin e, check with your doctor or nurse as soon as possible:

With doses greater than 400 Units a day and long-term use

Vitamin E contraindications

See also:
What is the most important information I should know about Vitamin E?

Hypersensitivity to vitamin E or any component of the formulation

Active ingredient matches for D-panthenol/niacinamide/vitamin A/vitamin B1/vitamin B2/vitamin B6/vitamin C/vitamin D3/vitamin E:

D-panthenol/niacinamide/vitamin A/vitamin B1/vitamin B2/vitamin B6/vitamin C/vitamin D3/vitamin E


References

  1. DailyMed. "CHOLECALCIFEROL: DailyMed provides trustworthy information about marketed drugs in the United States. DailyMed is the official provider of FDA label information (package inserts).". https://dailymed.nlm.nih.gov/dailyme... (accessed September 17, 2018).
  2. PubChem. "Vitamin D3". https://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/com... (accessed September 17, 2018).
  3. DrugBank. "Vitamin D3". http://www.drugbank.ca/drugs/DB11094 (accessed September 17, 2018).

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