Diabitex Dosage

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Dosage of Diabitex in details

The dose of a drug and dosage of the drug are two different terminologies. Dose is defined as the quantity or amount of medicine given by the doctor or taken by the patient at a given period. Dosage is the regimen prescribed by the doctor about how many days and how many times per day the drug is to be taken in specified dose by the patient. The dose is expressed in mg for tablets or gm, micro gm sometimes, ml for syrups or drops for kids syrups. The dose is not fixed for a drug for all conditions, and it changes according to the condition or a disease. It also changes on the age of the patient.
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There is no fixed dosage regimen for the management of type 2 diabetes with Diabitex (Diabitex) or any other hypoglycemic agent. The patient's blood glucose must be monitored periodically to determine the minimum effective dose for the patient; to detect primary failure, i.e., inadequate lowering of blood glucose at the maximum recommended dose of medication; and to detect secondary failure, i.e., loss of an adequate blood glucose lowering response after an initial period of effectiveness. Glycosylated hemoglobin levels may also be of value in monitoring the patient's response to therapy.

Short-term administration of Diabitex (Diabitex) may be sufficient during periods of transient loss of control in patients usually controlled well on diet.

The total daily dosage is generally taken at a single time each morning with breakfast. Occasionally cases of gastrointestinal intolerance may be relieved by dividing the daily dosage. A LOADING OR PRIMING DOSE IS NOT NECESSARY AND SHOULD NOT BE USED.

Initial Therapy

  1. The mild to moderately severe, middle-aged, stable type 2 diabetes patient should be started on 250 mg daily. In elderly patients, debilitated or malnourished patients, and patients with impaired renal or hepatic function, the initial and maintenance dosing should be conservative to avoid hypoglycemic reactions. Older patients should be started on smaller amounts of Diabitex (Diabitex), in the range of 100 to 125 mg daily.
  2. No transition period is necessary when transferring patients from other oral hypoglycemic agents to Diabitex (Diabitex). The other agent may be discontinued abruptly and Diabitex started at once. In prescribing Diabitex, due consideration must be given to its greater potency.

Many mild to moderately severe, middle-aged, stable type 2 diabetes patients receiving insulin can be placed directly on the oral drug and their insulin abruptly discontinued. For patients requiring more than 40 units of insulin daily, therapy with Diabitex (Diabitex) may be initiated with a 50 per cent reduction in insulin for the first few days, with subsequent further reductions dependent upon the response.

During the initial period of therapy with Diabitex, hypoglycemic reactions may occasionally occur, particularly during the transition from insulin to the oral drug. Hypoglycemia within 24 hours after withdrawal of the intermediate or long-acting types of insulin will usually prove to be the result of insulin carry-over and not primarily due to the effect of Diabitex.

During the insulin withdrawal period, the patient should self-monitor glucose levels at least three times daily. If they are abnormal, the physician should be notified immediately. In some cases, it may be advisable to consider hospitalization during the transition period.

Five to seven days after the initial therapy, the blood level of Diabitex reaches a plateau. Dosage may subsequently be adjusted upward or downward by increments of not more than 50 to 125 mg at intervals of three to five days to obtain optimal control. More frequent adjustments are usually undesirable.

Maintenance Therapy

Most moderately severe, middle-aged, stable type 2 diabetes patients are controlled by approximately 250 mg daily. Many investigators have found that some milder diabetics do well on daily doses of 100 mg or less. Many of the more severe diabetics may require 500 mg daily for adequate control. PATIENTS WHO DO NOT RESPOND COMPLETELY TO 500 MG DAILY WILL USUALLY NOT RESPOND TO HIGHER DOSES. MAINTENANCE DOSES ABOVE 750 mg DAILY SHOULD BE AVOIDED.

How supplied

Strength Tablet Description Tablet Code NDC Package Size
Diabitex (Diabitex) 100 mg Blue, D- shaped, scored 393 0069-3930-66 100's
Diabitex (Diabitex) 250 mg Blue, D- shaped, scored 394 0069-3940-66

0069-3940-82

100's

1000's

RECOMMENDED STORAGE: Store below 86°F (30°C).

Distributed by: Pfizer Labs, Division of Pfizer Inc, NY, NY, 10017

What other drugs will affect Diabitex?

You may be more likely to have hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) if you are taking Diabitex with other drugs that raise blood sugar, such as:

You may be more likely to have hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) if you are taking Diabitex with other drugs that lower blood sugar, such as:

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with Diabitex. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

Diabitex interactions

Interactions are the effects that happen when the drug is taken along with the food or when taken with other medications. Suppose if you are taking a drug Diabitex, it may have interactions with specific foods and specific medications. It will not interact with all foods and medications. The interactions vary from drug to drug. You need to be aware of interactions of the medicine you take. Most medications may interact with alcohol, tobacco, so be cautious.
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The following products can lead to hypoglycemia:

The hypoglycemic action of sulfonylurea may be potentiated by certain drugs including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents and other drugs that are highly protein bound, salicylates, sulfonamides, chloramphenicol, probenecid, coumarins, monoamine oxidase inhibitors, and beta adrenergic blocking agents. When such drugs are administered to a patient receiving Diabitex (Diabitex), the patient should be observed closely for hypoglycemia. When such drugs are withdrawn from a patient receiving Diabitex (Diabitex), the patient should be observed closely for loss of control.

Miconazole: A potential interaction between oral miconazole and oral hypoglycemic agents leading to severe hypoglycemia has been reported. Whether this interaction also occurs with intravenous, topical, or vaginal preparations of miconazole is not known.

Alcohol: In some patients, a disulfiram-like reaction may be produced by the ingestion of alcohol. Moderate to large amounts of alcohol may increase the risk of hypoglycemia (ref.l), (ref. 2).

The following products can lead to hyperglycemia:

Certain drugs tend to produce hyperglycemia and may lead to loss of control. These drugs include the thiazides and other diuretics, corticosteroids, phenothiazines, thyroid products, estrogens, oral contraceptives, phenytoin, nicotinic acid, sympathomimetics, calcium channel blocking drugs, and isoniazid.

When such drugs are administered to a patient receiving Diabitex (Diabitex), the patient should be closely observed for loss of control. When such drugs are withdrawn from a patient receiving Diabitex (Diabitex), the patient should be observed closely for hypoglycemia.

Since animal studies suggest that the action of barbiturates may be prolonged by therapy with Diabitex, barbiturates should be employed with caution.


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References

  1. DailyMed. "CHLORPROPAMIDE: DailyMed provides trustworthy information about marketed drugs in the United States. DailyMed is the official provider of FDA label information (package inserts).". https://dailymed.nlm.nih.gov/dailyme... (accessed September 17, 2018).
  2. FDA/SPL Indexing Data. "WTM2C3IL2X: The UNique Ingredient Identifier (UNII) is an alphanumeric substance identifier from the joint FDA/USP Substance Registration System (SRS).". https://www.fda.gov/ForIndustry/Data... (accessed September 17, 2018).
  3. MeSH. "Hypoglycemic Agents". https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/68... (accessed September 17, 2018).

Reviews

The results of a survey conducted on ndrugs.com for Diabitex are given in detail below. The results of the survey conducted are based on the impressions and views of the website users and consumers taking Diabitex. We implore you to kindly base your medical condition or therapeutic choices on the result or test conducted by a physician or licensed medical practitioners.

User reports

1 consumer reported frequency of use

How frequently do I need to take Diabitex?
It was reported by ndrugs.com website users that Diabitex should ideally be taken Once in a day as the most common frequency of the Diabitex. You should you adhere strictly to the instructions and guidelines provided by your doctor on how frequently this Diabitex should be taken. Get another patient's view on how frequent the capsule should be used by clicking here.
Users%
Once in a day1
100.0%


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Information checked by Dr. Sachin Kumar, MD Pharmacology

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