Endofit Overdose

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Overdose of Endofit in details

When a dose is taken in higher dose than the recommended doses, it is called Overdose. Overdose always needs a clinical supervision. Any medicine or drug when consumed in Overdose produces untoward side effects on one or various organs in the body. A medicine is excreted in the kidney or metabolized in the liver most of the times. This process goes without any hurdles when taken in normal dose, but when taken in an overdose, the body is not able to metabolize it or send it out properly which causes the effects of anoverdose.
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Acute toxicity studies performed with Endofit did not indicate a risk of acute adverse effects in case of inadvertent intake of a multiple of the daily therapeutic dose. There is no specific antidote. Endofit 20-30 mg/day (10-15 times higher dose than in Endofit) over 24 weeks of use were very well tolerated.

Endofit warnings

Warnings are a mix of Precautions. Contraindications and interactions and serious harmful effects associated with the medicine intake. A diabetic or Hypertensive patient need to be warned about few drug interactions. A known hypersensitivity patient needs to be careful about the reactions or anaphylactic shock. A pregnant woman or a breastfeeding woman should be warned of certain medications. A Hepatitis [liver disease] patient or a cardiac patient should avoid few drugs.

this medicine should not be used during pregnancy.

If pregnancy occurs during use of Qlaira, further intake should be stopped. However, extensive epidemiological studies with ethinylestradiol containing COCs have revealed neither an

If any of the conditions/risk factors mentioned below are present, the benefits of COC use should be weighed against the possible risks for each individual woman and discussed with the woman before she decides to start taking it. In the event of aggravation, exacerbation or first appearance of any of these conditions or risk factors, the woman should contact her physician. The physician should then decide whether COC use should be discontinued.

No epidemiological studies on the effects of estradiol/ estradiol valerate containing COC’s exist. All the following warnings and precautions are derived from clinical and epidemiological data of ethinyl estradiol containing COCs. Whether these warning and precautions apply to this medicineis unknown.

• Circulatory Disorders

Epidemiological studies have shown that the incidence of VTE in users of oral contraceptives with low oestrogen content (<50 µg ethinylestradiol) ranges from about 20 to 40 cases per 100,000 woman-years, but this risk estimate varies according to the progestogen. This compares with 5 to 10 cases per 100,000 woman-years for non-users.

The use of any combined oral contraceptive (including Qlaira) carries an increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) compared with no use. The excess risk of VTE is highest during the first year a woman ever uses a combined oral contraceptive. The incidence of VTE associated with pregnancy is estimated as 60 cases per 100,000 pregnancies. VTE is fatal in 1-2% of cases.

The risk of VTE during use of this medicineis currently unknown.

Epidemiological studies have also associated the use of ethinylestradiol containing COCs with an increased risk for arterial (myocardial infarction, transient ischaemic attack) thromboembolism.

Extremely rarely, thrombosis has been reported to occur in other blood vessels, e.g. hepatic, mesenteric, renal, cerebral or retinal veins and arteries, in COC users. There is no consensus as to whether the occurrence of these events is associated with the use of COCs.

Symptoms of venous or arterial thrombotic/thromboembolic events or of a cerebrovascular accident can include:

• unilateral leg pain and/ or swelling;

• sudden severe pain in the chest, whether or not it radiates to the left arm;

• sudden breathlessness;

• sudden onset of coughing;

• any unusual, severe, prolonged headache;

• sudden partial or complete loss of vision;

• diplopia;

• slurred speech or aphasia;

• vertigo;

• collapse with or without focal seizure;

• weakness or very marked numbness suddenly affecting one side or one part of the body; motor disturbances;

•“acute” abdomen.

The risk for venous thromboembolic events in COCs users increases with:

• increasing age

• a positive family history (venous thromboembolism ever in a sibling or parent at relatively early age). If a hereditary predisposition is suspected, the woman should be referred to a specialist for advice before deciding about any COC use.

• prolonged immobilisation, major surgery, any surgery to the legs, or major trauma. In these situations it is advisable to discontinue the pill (in the case of elective surgery at least four weeks in advance) and not resume until two weeks after complete remobilisation. Antithrombotic treatment should be considered if the pills have not been discontinued in advance.

• obesity (body mass index over 30 kg/m²).

There is no consensus about the possible role of varicose veins and superficial thrombophlebitis in the onset or progression of venous thrombosis.

The risk of arterial thromboembolic events or of a cerebrovascular accident increases with:

? increasing age;

? smoking (women over 35 years should be strongly advised not to smoke if they wish to use an COC);

? a positive family history (arterial thromboembolism ever in a sibling or parent at a relatively early age). If a hereditary predisposition is suspected, the woman should be referred to a specialist for advice before deciding about any COC use;

? obesity (body mass index over 30 kg/m2);

? dyslipoproteinaemia;

? hypertension;

? migraine;

? valvular heart disease;

? atrial fibrillation;

The presence of one serious risk factor or multiple risk factors for venous or arterial disease, respectively, can also constitute a contra-indication. The possibility of anticoagulant therapy should also be taken into account. COC users should be specifically pointed out to contact their physician in case of possible symptoms of thrombosis. In case of suspected or confirmed thrombosis, COC use should be discontinued. Adequate alternative contraception should be initiated because of the teratogenicity of anticoagulant therapy (coumarins).

The increased risk of venous thromboembolism in the puerperium must be considered.

Other medical conditions which have been associated with adverse circulatory events include diabetes mellitus, systemic lupus erythematosus, hemolytic uremic syndrome, chronic inflammatory bowel disease (Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis) and sickle cell disease.

An increase in frequency or severity of migraine during COC use (which may be prodromal of a cerebrovascular event) may be a reason for immediate discontinuation of the COC.

• Tumours

An increased risk of cervical cancer in long-term users of COCs (> 5 years) has been reported in some epidemiological studies, but there continues to be controversy about the extent to which this finding is attributable to the confounding effects of sexual behaviour and other factors such as human papilloma virus (HPV).

A meta-analysis from 54 epidemiological studies reported that there is a slightly increased relative risk (RR = 1.24) of having breast cancer diagnosed in women who are currently using COCs. The excess risk gradually disappears during the course of the 10 years after cessation of COC use. Because breast cancer is rare in women under 40 years of age, the excess number of breast cancer diagnoses in current and recent COC users is small in relation to the overall risk of breast cancer. These studies do not provide evidence for causation. The observed pattern of increased risk may be due to an earlier diagnosis of breast cancer in COC users, the biological effects of COCs or a combination of both. The breast cancers diagnosed in ever-users tend to be less advanced clinically than the cancers diagnosed in never-users.

In rare cases, benign liver tumours, and even more rarely, malignant liver tumours have been reported in users of COCs. In isolated cases, these tumours have led to life-threatening intra-abdominal hemorrhages. A hepatic tumour should be considered in the differential diagnosis when severe upper abdominal pain, liver enlargement or signs of intra-abdominal hemorrhage occur in women taking COCs.

• Other conditions

Women with hypertriglyceridaemia, or a family history thereof, may be at an increased risk of pancreatitis when using COCs.

Although small increase s in blood pressure have been reported in many women taking COCs, clinically relevant increases are rare. However, if a sustained clinically significant hypertension develops during the use of a COC then it is prudent for the physician to withdraw the COC and treat the hypertension. Where considered appropriate, COC use may be resumed if normotensive values can be achieved with antihypertensive therapy.

The following conditions have been reported to occur or deteriorate with both pregnancy and COC use, but the evidence of an association with COC use is inconclusive: jaundice and/or pruritus related to cholestasis; gallstone formation; porphyria; systemic lupus erythematosus; hemolytic uremic syndrome; Sydenham’s chorea; herpes gestationis; otosclerosis-related hearing loss.

In women with hereditary angioedema exogenous estrogens may induce or exacerbate symptoms of angioedema.

Acute or chronic disturbances of liver function may necessitate the discontinuation of COC use until markers of liver function return to normal. Recurrence of cholestatic jaundice which occurred first during pregnancy or previous use of sex steroids necessitates the discontinuation of COCs.

Although COCs may have an effect on peripheral insulin resistance and glucose tolerance, there is no evidence for a need to alter the therapeutic regimen in diabetics using low-dose COCs (containing <0.05 mg ethinylestradiol). However, diabetic women should be carefully observed while taking COCs, particularly in the early stage of COC use.

Worsening of endogenous depression, of epilepsy, of Crohn’s disease and of ulcerative colitis has been reported during COC use.

Chloasma may occasionally occur, especially in women with a history of chloasma gravidarum. Women with a tendency to chloasma should avoid exposure to the sun or ultraviolet radiation whilst taking COCs.

Estrogens may cause fluid retention, and therefore patients with cardiac or renal dysfunction should be carefully observed. Patients with terminal renal insufficiency should be closely observed, since the level of circulating estrogens may be increased after administration of Qlaira.

This medicinal product contains not more than 50 mg lactose per tablet. Patients with rare hereditary problems of galactose intolerance, the Lapp lactase deficiency or glucose-galactose malabsorption who are on a lactose-free diet should take this amount into consideration.

Medical examination/consultation

A complete medical history (including family history) and physical examination should be taken prior to the initiation or reinstitution of COC use and pregnancy must be ruled out. Blood pressure should be measured and a physical examination should be performed, guided by the contra-indications and warnings. The woman should also be instructed to carefully read the user booklet and to adhere to the advice given. The frequency and nature of examinations should be based on established practice guidelines and be adapted to the individual woman.

Women should be advised that oral contraceptives do not protect against HIV infections (AIDS) and other sexually transmitted diseases.

Reduced efficacy

The efficacy of COCs may be reduced for example in the following events: missed active tablets (section 4.2), gastro-intestinal disturbances (section 4.2) during active tablet taking or concomitant medication (section 4.5).

Cycle control

With all COCs, irregular bleeding (spotting or breakthrough bleeding) may occur, especially during the first months of use. Therefore, the evaluation of any irregular bleeding is only meaningful after an adaptation interval of about 3 cycles.

Based on patient diaries from a comparative clinical trial, the percentage of women per cycle experiencing intracyclic bleeding was 10 – 18 % for women using Qlaira.

Users of this medicinemay experience amenorrhea although not being pregnant. Based on patient diaries, amenorrhea occurs in approximately 15% of cycles.

If this medicinehas been taken according to the directions described in Section 4.2, it is unlikely that the woman is pregnant. If this medicinehas not been taken according to these directions prior to the first missed withdrawal bleed or if the withdrawal bleeding is missed in two consecutive cycles, pregnancy must be ruled out before this medicineuse is continued.

If bleeding irregularities persist or occur after previously regular cycles, then non-hormonal causes should be considered and adequate diagnostic measures are indicated to exclude malignancy or pregnancy. These may include curettage. increased risk of birth defects in children born to women who used COCs prior to pregnancy, nor a teratogenic effect when COCs were taken inadvertently during pregnancy. Animal studies do not indicate a risk for reproductive toxicity.

Lactation may be influenced by COCs as they may reduce the quantity and change the composition of breast milk. Therefore, the use of COCs should generally not be recommended until the nursing mother has completely weaned her child. Small amounts of the contraceptive steroids and/or their metabolites may be excreted with the milk. These amounts may affect the child.

Endofit precautions

Certain people who are very sick or very old or who are sensitive show an exacerbation of side effect of the drug which can turn dangerous at times. So, it is very important to remember the precautions while taking the medicine. Pregnancy and Breastfeeding are also special categories wherein extra care or precaution is needed when taking a drug. Few patients may have a hypersensitivity reaction to few medications, and that can be life-threatening rarely. Penicillin hypersensitivity is one example. Diarrhea, rashes are few other symptoms which need a watch. A patient with other co-existing diseases like liver disease, heart disease, kidney disease should take special precautions.
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Before starting Endofit treatment, pregnancy must be excluded.

During treatment, patients are advised to use nonhormonal methods of contraception (eg, barrier method) if contraception is required.

Pregnancies that occur among users of progestogen-only preparations used for contraception are more likely to be ectopic than are pregnancies among users of combined oral contraceptives. Therefore, in women with a history of extrauterine pregnancy or an impairment of tube function, the use of Endofit should be decided on only after carefully weighing the benefits against the risks.

As Endofit is a progestogen-only preparation, it can be assumed that special warnings and special precautions for use of other progestogen-only preparations are also valid for the use of Endofit although not all of the warnings and precautions are based on respective findings in the clinical studies with Endofit.

If any of the conditions/risk factors mentioned as follows is present or deteriorates, an individual risk-benefit analysis should be done before treatment with Endofit can be started or continued.

Circulatory Disorders: From epidemiological studies there is little evidence for an association between progestogen-only preparations and an increased risk of myocardial infarction or cerebral thromboembolism. The risk of cardiovascular and cerebral events is rather related to increasing age, hypertension and smoking. In women with hypertension the risk of stroke may be slightly enhanced by progestogen-only preparations.

Some studies indicate that there may be a slightly, but not statistically significant increased risk of venous thromboembolism (deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism) associated with the use of progestogen-only preparations. Generally, recognized risk factors for venous thromboembolism (VTE) include a positive personal or family history (VTE in a sibling or a parent at a relatively early age), age, obesity, prolonged immobilization, major surgery or major trauma. In case of long-term immobilization it is advisable to discontinue the use of Endofit (in the case of elective surgery at least 4 weeks in advance) and not to resume treatment until 2 weeks after complete remobilization.

The increased risk of thromboembolism in the puerperium must be considered.

Treatment should be stopped at once if there are symptoms of an arterial or venous thrombotic event or suspicion thereof.

Tumors: A meta-analysis from 54 epidemiological studies reported that there is a slightly increased relative risk (RR=1.24) of having breast cancer diagnosed in women who are currently using oral contraceptives (OCs), mainly estrogen-progestogen preparations. The excess risk gradually disappears during the course of 10 years after cessation of combined oral contraceptives (COC) use. Because breast cancer is rare in women <40 years, the excess number of breast cancer diagnoses in current and recent COC users is small in relation to the overall risk of breast cancer. The risk of having breast cancer diagnosed in progestogen-only pill users is possibly of similar magnitude to that associated with COC. However, for progestogen-only preparations, the evidence is based on much smaller populations of users and so is less conclusive than that for COCs. These studies do not provide evidence for causation. The observed pattern of increased risk may be due to an earlier diagnosis of breast cancer in OC users, the biological effects of OCs or a combination of both. The breast cancers diagnosed in ever-users tend to be less advanced clinically than the cancers diagnosed in never-users.

In rare cases, benign liver tumors, and even more rarely, malignant liver tumors have been reported in users of hormonal substances eg, the one contained in Endofit.

In isolated cases, these tumors have led to life-threatening intra-abdominal hemorrhages.

A hepatic tumour should be considered in the differential diagnosis when severe upper abdominal pain, liver enlargement or signs of intra-abdominal haemorrhage occur in women taking Endofit.

Changes in Bleeding Pattern: Endofit treatment affects the menstrual bleeding pattern in the majority of women.

Uterine bleeding, eg, in women with adenomyosis uteri or uterine leiomyomata, may be aggravated with the use of Endofit. If bleeding is heavy and continuous over time, this may lead to anemia (severe in some cases). Discontinuation of Endofit should be considered in such cases.

Osteoporosis: In patients who are at an increased risk of osteoporosis, a careful risk-benefit assessment should be performed before starting Endofit because endogenous estrogen levels are moderately decreased during treatment with Endofit.

Other Conditions: Patients who have a history of depression should be carefully observed and the drug discontinued if the depression recurs to a serious degree.

Endofit generally does not appear to affect blood pressure in normotensive women. However, if a sustained clinically significant hypertension develops during the use of Endofit, it is advisable to withdraw Endofit and treat the hypertension.

Recurrence of cholestatic jaundice and/or pruritus which occurred 1st during pregnancy or previous use of sex steroids necessitates the discontinuation of Endofit.

Endofit may have a slight effect on peripheral insulin resistance and glucose tolerance. Diabetic women, especially those with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus, should be carefully observed while taking Endofit.

Chloasma may occasionally occur, especially in women with a history of chloasma gravidarum. Women with a tendency to chloasma should avoid exposure to the sun or ultraviolet radiation whilst taking Endofit.

Persistent ovarian follicles (often referred to as functional ovarian cysts) may occur during the use of Endofit. Most of these follicles are asymptomatic, although some may be accompanied by pelvic pain.

Lactose: Each Endofit tablet contains lactose monohydrate 62.8 mg. Patients with rare hereditary problems of galactose intolerance, Lapp lactase deficiency or glucose-galactose malabsorption who are on a lactose-free diet should consider the amount contained in Endofit.

Effects on the Ability to Drive or Operate Machinery: No effects on the ability to drive and use machines have been observed in users of products containing Endofit.

Impairment of Fertility: Based on available data, ovulation is inhibited in the majority of patients during treatment with Endofit. However, Endofit is not a contraceptive.

If contraception is required a nonhormonal method should be used.

Based on available data, the menstrual cycle returns to normal within 2 months after cessation of treatment with Endofit.

Use in pregnancy: There is limited data from the use of Endofit in pregnant women.

Animal studies do not indicate direct or indirect harmful effects with respect to reproductive toxicity.

Endofit must not be administered to pregnant women because there is no need to treat endometriosis during pregnancy.

Use in lactation: Treatment with Endofit during lactation is not recommended.

It is unknown if Endofit is excreted in human milk. Data in animals have shown excretion of Endofit in rat milk.

A decision must be made whether to discontinue breastfeeding or to abstain from Endofit therapy taking into account the benefit of breastfeeding for the child and the benefit of therapy for the woman.

Use in children: Endofit is not indicated in children prior to menarche. The safety and efficacy of Endofit in adolescents (menarche to 18 years) has not yet been established.

Use in the

Elderly: There is no relevant indication for the use of Endofit in the geriatric population.


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References

  1. DailyMed. "DIENOGEST; ESTRADIOL VALERATE: DailyMed provides trustworthy information about marketed drugs in the United States. DailyMed is the official provider of FDA label information (package inserts).". https://dailymed.nlm.nih.gov/dailyme... (accessed September 17, 2018).
  2. DrugBank. "Dienogest". http://www.drugbank.ca/drugs/DB09123 (accessed September 17, 2018).
  3. MeSH. "Hormone Antagonists". https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/68... (accessed September 17, 2018).

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