Godec Dosage

How times a day do you take this medicine?
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Dosage of Godec in details

The dose of a drug and dosage of the drug are two different terminologies. Dose is defined as the quantity or amount of medicine given by the doctor or taken by the patient at a given period. Dosage is the regimen prescribed by the doctor about how many days and how many times per day the drug is to be taken in specified dose by the patient. The dose is expressed in mg for tablets or gm, micro gm sometimes, ml for syrups or drops for kids syrups. The dose is not fixed for a drug for all conditions, and it changes according to the condition or a disease. It also changes on the age of the patient.
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Carefully consider the potential benefits and risks of Godec extended-release tablets, and other treatment options before deciding to use Godec extended-release tablets. Use the lowest effective dose for the shortest duration consistent with individual patient treatment goals.

After observing the response to initial therapy with Godec extended-release tablets the dose and frequency should be adjusted to suit an individual patient’s needs.

For the relief of osteoarthritis, the recommended dosage is 100 mg daily.

For the relief of rheumatoid arthritis, the recommended dosage is 100 mg daily. In the rare patient where Godec extended-release tablets 100 mg/day is unsatisfactory, the dose may be increased to 100 mg twice a day if the benefits outweigh the clinical risks of increased side effects.

Different formulations of Godec (Godec enteric-coated tablets; Godec extended-release tablets; Godec potassium immediate-release tablets) are not necessarily bioequivalent even if the milligram strength is the same.

What other drugs will affect Godec?

Ask your doctor before using Godec if you take an antidepressant such as citalopram, escitalopram, fluoxetine (Prozac), fluvoxamine, paroxetine, sertraline (Zoloft), trazodone, or vilazodone. Taking any of these medicines with an NSAID may cause you to bruise or bleed easily.

Tell your doctor about all your current medicines and any you start or stop using, especially:

This list is not complete. Other drugs may interact with Godec, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Not all possible interactions are listed in this medication guide.

Godec interactions

Interactions are the effects that happen when the drug is taken along with the food or when taken with other medications. Suppose if you are taking a drug Godec, it may have interactions with specific foods and specific medications. It will not interact with all foods and medications. The interactions vary from drug to drug. You need to be aware of interactions of the medicine you take. Most medications may interact with alcohol, tobacco, so be cautious.
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Aspirin: Concomitant administration of Godec and aspirin is not recommended because Godec is displaced from its binding sites during the concomitant administration of aspirin, resulting in lower plasma concentrations, peak plasma levels, and AUC values.

Anticoagulants: While studies have not shown Godec to interact with anticoagulants of the warfarin type, caution should be exercised, nonetheless, since interactions have been seen with other NSAIDs. Because prostaglandins play an important role in hemostasis, and NSAIDs affect platelet function as well, concurrent therapy with all NSAIDs, including Godec, and warfarin requires close monitoring of patients to be certain that no change in their anticoagulant dosage is required.

Digoxin, Methotrexate, Cyclosporine: Godec, like other NSAIDs, may affect renal prostaglandins and increase the toxicity of certain drugs. Ingestion of Godec may increase serum concentrations of digoxin and methotrexate and increase cyclosporineís nephrotoxicity. Patients who begin taking Godec or who increase their Godec dose or any other NSAID while taking digoxin, methotrexate, or cyclosporine may develop toxicity characteristics for these drugs. They should be observed closely, particularly if renal function is impaired. In the case of digoxin, serum levels should be monitored.

Lithium: Godec decreases lithium renal clearance and increases lithium plasma levels. In patients taking Godec and lithium concomitantly, lithium toxicity may develop.

Oral Hypoglycemics:

Godec does not alter glucose metabolism in normal subjects nor does it alter the effects of oral hypoglycemic agents. There are rare reports, however, from marketing experiences, of changes in effects of insulin or oral hypoglycemic agents in the presence of Godec that necessitated changes in the doses of such agents. Both hypo- and hyperglycemic effects have been reported. A direct causal relationship has not been established, but physicians should consider the possibility that Godec may alter a diabetic patientís response to insulin or oral hypoglycemic agents.

Diuretics: Godec and other NSAIDs can inhibit the activity of diuretics. Concomitant treatment with potassium-sparing diuretics may be associated with increased serum potassium levels.

Other Drugs: In small groups of patients (7-10/interaction study), the concomitant administration of azathioprine, gold, chloroquine, D-penicillamine, prednisolone, doxycycline, or digitoxin did not significantly affect the peak levels and AUC values of Godec. Phenobarbital toxicity has been reported to have occurred in a patient on chronic phenobarbital treatment following the initiation of Godec therapy.

Protein Binding

In vitro, Godec interferes minimally or not at all with the protein binding of salicylic acid (20% decrease in binding), tolbutamide, prednisolone (10% decrease in binding), or warfarin. Benzylpenicillin, ampicillin, oxacillin, chlortetracycline, doxycycline, cephalothin, erythromycin, and sulfamethoxazole have no influence in vitro on the protein binding of Godec in human serum.

Drug/Laboratory Test Interactions

Effect on Blood Coagulation: Godec increases platelet aggregation time but does not affect bleeding time, plasma thrombin clotting time, plasma fibrinogen, or factors V and VII to XII. Statistically significant changes in prothrombin and partial thromboplastin times have been reported in normal volunteers. The mean changes were observed to be less than 1 second in both instances, however, and are unlikely to be clinically important. Godec is a prostaglandin synthetase inhibitor, however, and all drugs that inhibit prostaglandin synthesis interfere with platelet function to some degree; therefore, patients who may be adversely affected by such an action should be carefully observed.


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References

  1. DailyMed. "DICLOFENAC EPOLAMINE: DailyMed provides trustworthy information about marketed drugs in the United States. DailyMed is the official provider of FDA label information (package inserts).". https://dailymed.nlm.nih.gov/dailyme... (accessed September 17, 2018).
  2. FDA/SPL Indexing Data. "144O8QL0L1: The UNique Ingredient Identifier (UNII) is an alphanumeric substance identifier from the joint FDA/USP Substance Registration System (SRS).". https://www.fda.gov/ForIndustry/Data... (accessed September 17, 2018).
  3. MeSH. "Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors". https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/68... (accessed September 17, 2018).

Reviews

The results of a survey conducted on ndrugs.com for Godec are given in detail below. The results of the survey conducted are based on the impressions and views of the website users and consumers taking Godec. We implore you to kindly base your medical condition or therapeutic choices on the result or test conducted by a physician or licensed medical practitioners.

User reports

1 consumer reported frequency of use

How frequently do I need to take Godec?
It was reported by ndrugs.com website users that Godec should ideally be taken Twice in a day as the most common frequency of the Godec. You should you adhere strictly to the instructions and guidelines provided by your doctor on how frequently this Godec should be taken. Get another patient's view on how frequent the capsule should be used by clicking here.
Users%
Twice in a day1
100.0%


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Information checked by Dr. Sachin Kumar, MD Pharmacology

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