Magnesium chloride/Meglumine sodium succinate/potassium chloride/sodium chloride Uses

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Consists of magnesium chloride, Meglumine sodium succinate, potassium chloride, sodium chloride

What is Magnesium chloride?

Calcium and magnesium are naturally occurring minerals. Calcium is needed for bone formation and maintenance. Magnesium helps maintain muscle function and normal heart rhythm.

Magnesium chloride is a combination medicine used as a supplement. Magnesium chloride is given when your diet does not provide enough of these minerals, or when they are lost through perspiration.

Magnesium chloride may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

Magnesium chloride indications

An indication is a term used for the list of condition or symptom or illness for which the medicine is prescribed or used by the patient. For example, acetaminophen or paracetamol is used for fever by the patient, or the doctor prescribes it for a headache or body pains. Now fever, headache and body pains are the indications of paracetamol. A patient should be aware of the indications of medications used for common conditions because they can be taken over the counter in the pharmacy meaning without prescription by the Physician.
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Oral

Dietary supplementation

Adult: Adjust according to individual requirement. RDA (elemental magnesium): 19-30 yr: Female: 310 mg/day, pregnant female: 350 mg/day, male: 400 mg/day. ≥31 yr: Female: 320 mg/day, pregnant female: 360 mg/day, male: 420 mg/day.

Intravenous

Hypomagnesaemia

Adult: 4 g of Magnesium Chloride in 250 mL of 5% Dextrose inj given via IV infusion (Max rate: 3 mL/min). Monitor serum magnesium to guide subsequent dosage. Usual dosage range: 1-40 g Magnesium Chloride daily.

How should I use Magnesium chloride?

Use Magnesium chloride as directed by your doctor. Check the label on the medicine for exact dosing instructions.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Magnesium chloride.

Uses of Magnesium chloride in details

There are specific as well as general uses of a drug or medicine. A medicine can be used to prevent a disease, treat a disease over a period or cure a disease. It can also be used to treat the particular symptom of the disease. The drug use depends on the form the patient takes it. It may be more useful in injection form or sometimes in tablet form. The drug can be used for a single troubling symptom or a life-threatening condition. While some medications can be stopped after few days, some drugs need to be continued for prolonged period to get the benefit from it.
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This medication is a mineral supplement used to prevent and treat low amounts of magnesium in the blood. Magnesium is very important for the normal functioning of cells, nerves, muscles, bones, and the heart. Usually, a well-balanced diet provides normal blood levels of magnesium. However, certain situations cause your body to lose magnesium faster than you can replace it from your diet. These situations include treatment with "water pills" (diuretics such as furosemide, hydrochlorothiazide), a poor diet, alcoholism, or other medical conditions (e.g., severe diarrhea/vomiting, stomach/intestinal absorption problems, poorly controlled diabetes).

How to use Magnesium chloride

Take this product by mouth as directed. Follow all directions on the product package. If you are uncertain about any of the information, consult your doctor or pharmacist.

It is best to take magnesium supplements with a meal to reduce stomach upset and diarrhea unless otherwise directed by the product instructions or your doctor.

Take each dose with a full glass (8 ounces or 240 milliliters) of water unless your doctor directs you otherwise. Swallow extended-release capsules and delayed-release/enteric coated tablets or capsules whole. Do not crush or chew extended-release or delayed-release/enteric coated capsules or tablets. Doing so can release all of the drug at once, increasing the risk of side effects. Also, do not split extended-release tablets unless they have a score line and your doctor or pharmacist tells you to do so. Swallow the whole or split tablet without crushing or chewing.

If you are using a liquid product, use a medication measuring device to carefully measure the dose. Do not use a household spoon because you may not get the correct dose. If you are using a suspension, shake the bottle well before each dose.

Take this medication regularly in order to get the most benefit from it. Remember to take it at the same time(s) each day. Dosage is based on your medical condition and response to treatment. Do not increase your dose or take it more often than directed on the product package or by your doctor. Too much magnesium in the blood can cause serious side effects.

Tell your doctor if symptoms of low magnesium blood levels (e.g., muscle cramps, tiredness, irritability, depression) persist or worsen. If you think you may have a serious medical problem, seek immediate medical attention.

Magnesium chloride dosage

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Magnesium Chloride Dosage

Medically reviewed on June 28, 2018.

Applies to the following strengths: 64 mg; 200 mg/mL

Usual Adult Dose for:

Usual Pediatric Dose for:

Additional dosage information:

Usual Adult Dose for Hypomagnesemia

Mild hypomagnesemia:

If oral administration is tolerated, mild hypomagnesemia may be treated with Slow-Mag 1 tablet (535 mg magnesium chloride, 64 mg elemental magnesium) orally once a day.

Severe hypomagnesemia:

40 mEq (4 g magnesium chloride) in 5% dextrose or normal saline by IV infusion once over 3 hours.

Usual Adult Dose for Myocardial Infarction

10 mEq in 5% dextrose or normal saline by IV infusion once within the first 24 hours of infarction.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Hypomagnesemia

Neonatal:

Hypomagnesemia: IV: Magnesium chloride: 0.2 to 0.4 mEq/kg/dose every 8 to 12 hours for 2 to 3 doses

Daily maintenance magnesium: IV: Magnesium chloride: 0.25 to 0.5 mEq/kg/day

Children:

IM or IV: Magnesium chloride: 0.2 to 0.4 mEq/kg/dose every 4 to 6 hours for 3 to 4 doses; maximum single dose: 16 mEq

Oral: Note: Achieving optimal magnesium levels using oral therapy may be difficult due to the propensity for magnesium to cause diarrhea; IV replacement may be more appropriate particularly in situations of severe deficit: Magnesium chloride: 10 to 20 mg/kg elemental magnesium per dose up to 4 times/day

Daily maintenance magnesium: IV Magnesium chloride:

Infants and Children less than or equal to 45 kg: 0.25 to 0.5 mEq/kg/day

Adolescents greater than 45 kg and Adults: 0.2 to 0.5 mEq/kg/day or 3 to 10 mEq/1000 kcal/day (maximum: 8 to 20 mEq/day).

Renal Dose Adjustments

Magnesium salts should be used cautiously in patients with renal impairment due to increased risk of hypermagnesemia.

Liver Dose Adjustments

Data not available

Dose Adjustments

The dose may be increased periodically to achieve a normal serum magnesium level.

Precautions

Because magnesium is primarily eliminated by the kidney, there is significant risk of hypermagnesemia in patients with renal impairment.

Dialysis

Data not available; however, use of magnesium salts is generally contraindicated in renal failure.

Other Comments

Magnesium supplements are often used with "low normal" serum magnesium levels in patients predisposed to hypomagnesemia (e.g., patients on diuretics).

Further information

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

More about magnesium chloride

Consumer resources

Other brands: Magnesium chloride, Mag-SR

Professional resources

Related treatment guides

Magnesium chloride interactions

See also:
What other drugs will affect Magnesium chloride?

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If you are taking this product under your doctor's direction, your doctor or pharmacist may already be aware of possible drug interactions and may be monitoring you for them. Do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any medicine before checking with your doctor or pharmacist first.

Before using this product, tell your doctor or pharmacist of all prescription and nonprescription/herbal products you may use, especially of: cellulose sodium phosphate, digoxin, sodium polystyrene sulfonate.

Magnesium can bind with certain medications, preventing their full absorption. If you are taking a tetracycline-type medication (such as demeclocycline, doxycycline, minocycline, tetracycline), separate the time of the dose from the time of the magnesium supplement dose by at least 2 to 3 hours. If you are taking a bisphosphonate (for example, alendronate), a thyroid medication (for example, levothyroxine), or a quinolone-type antibiotic (e.g., ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin), ask your doctor or pharmacist about how long you should wait between doses and for help finding a dosing schedule that will work with all your medications.

Check the labels on all your prescription and nonprescription/herbal products (e.g., antacids, laxatives, vitamins) because they may contain magnesium. Ask your pharmacist about using those products safely.

This document does not contain all possible interactions. Therefore, before using this product, tell your doctor or pharmacist of all the products you use. Keep a list of all your medications with you, and share the list with your doctor and pharmacist.

Magnesium chloride side effects

See also:
What are the possible side effects of Magnesium chloride?

Applies to magnesium chloride: sustained-release tablets

Other dosage forms:

Check with your doctor if any of these most COMMON side effects persist or become bothersome:

Diarrhea.

Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur while taking magnesium chloride (the active ingredient contained in Magnesium chloride)

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); nausea; slow reflexes.

Magnesium chloride contraindications

See also:
What is the most important information I should know about Magnesium chloride?

Magnesium Chloride Injection should not be administered

if there is renal impairment, marked myocardial disease

or to comatose patients.

Meglumine sodium succinate indications

An indication is a term used for the list of condition or symptom or illness for which the medicine is prescribed or used by the patient. For example, acetaminophen or paracetamol is used for fever by the patient, or the doctor prescribes it for a headache or body pains. Now fever, headache and body pains are the indications of paracetamol. A patient should be aware of the indications of medications used for common conditions because they can be taken over the counter in the pharmacy meaning without prescription by the Physician.

This medication is used before an X-ray or similar tests (e.g., tomography) to help your doctor view on film, your throat (esophagus), stomach, and intestines more effectively. It may be used with other injectable products (IV contrast) as determined by your doctor.

Meglumine sodium succinate dosage

Dosage depends on the type & location of the investigation.

Meglumine sodium succinate interactions

Hypersensitivity reactions can be aggravated in patients on beta-blockers, particularly in people with bronchial asthma. Moreover, it should be considered that patients on beta-blockers may be refractory to standard treatment of hypersensitivity reactions with beta-agonists.

The prevalence of delayed reactions (eg fever, rash, flu-like symptoms, joint pain and pruritus) to contrast media is higher in patients who have received interleukin.

The presence of renal damage in diabetic patients is one of the factors predisposing to renal impairment following contrast media administration. This may precipitate lactic acidosis in patients who are taking biguanides. As a precaution, biguanides should be stopped 48 hours prior to the contrast agent examination and reinstated only after control of renal function has been regained.

Interference with diagnostic tests

Following the administration of iodinated contrast media, the capacity of the thyroid tissue to take up radioisotopes for diagnosing disorders of the thyroid is reduced for up to two weeks, and even longer in individual cases.

Pregnancy and lactation

Reproduction-toxicological studies with Meglumine sodium succinate- or sodium amidotrizoate gave no indication of a teratogenic or other embryotoxic potential following an inadvertent administration of Urografin during pregnancy.

It has not been sufficiently demonstrated that contrast media are safe for use in pregnant patients. Since, wherever possible, radiation exposure should be avoided during pregnancy, the benefits of any X-ray examination, with or without contrast media, should be carefully weighed against the possible risk.

Renally eliminated contrast media like Urografin enter the breast milk in only very small amounts.

Limited data suggest that the risk to the suckling infant of administering salts of diatrizoic acid to its mother is low. Breastfeeding is probably safe.

Meglumine sodium succinate side effects

Intravascular use

Side effects in association with the use of iodinated contrast media are usually mild to moderate and transient in nature. However, severe and life-threatening reactions as well as deaths have been reported. The prevalence of adverse drug reactions in patients receiving ionic contrast media is reported to be over 12% compared to over 3% for non-ionics.

Nausea, vomiting, a sensation of pain and a general feeling of warmth are the most frequently recorded reactions.

Anaphylactoid reactions/hypersensitivity

Angioedema, conjunctivitis, coughing, pruritus, rhinitis, sneezing and urticaria have been reported commonly. These reactions which can occur irrespective of the amount administered and the mode of administration, may be the first signs of an incipient state of shock. Administration of the contrast medium must be discontinued immediately and –if necessary –specific therapy instituted via a venous access.

Severe reactions requiring emergency treatment can occur in the form of a circulatory reaction accompanied by peripheral vasodilatation and subsequent hypotension, reflex tachycardia, dyspnoea, agitation, confusion and cyanosis possibly leading to unconsciousness.

Hypotension, bronchospasm and laryngeal spasm or oedema occur uncommonly.

Delayed contrast medium reactions are rare.

Body as a whole

Heat sensations and headache have been reported as being common. Malaise, chills or sweating and vasovagal reactions are uncommon.

In rare cases alterations in body temperature and swelling of salivary glands are possible.

Respiratory

Transient disturbance in respiratory rate, dyspnoea and respiratory distress and coughing are common.

Respiratory arrest and pulmonary oedema are rare reactions.

Cardiovascular

Clinically relevant transient disturbance in heart rate, blood pressure, disturbance in cardiac rhythm or function and cardiac arrest are uncommon.

Severe reactions requiring emergency treatment can occur in the form of a circulatory reaction accompanied by peripheral vasodilatation and subsequent hypotension, reflex tachycardia, dyspnoea, agitation, confusion and cyanosis possibly leading to unconsciousness.

Serious thromboembolic events causing myocardial infarction have been reported in rare cases.

Gastrointestinal

Nausea and vomiting are common reactions. Abdominal pain has been reported as being uncommon.

Cerebrovascular

Cerebral angiography and other procedures in which the contrast medium reaches the brain in high concentrations with the arterial blood can be accompanied by transient neurological complications such as: dizziness, headache, agitation or confusion, amnesia, disturbed speech, vision, hearing, convulsions, tremor, paresis/paralysis, photophobia, temporary blindness, coma, and somnolence are uncommon.

Serious, in isolated cases fatal, thromboembolic events causing stroke have been reported on rare occasions.

Renal

In rare cases renal impairment or failure have been reported.

Skin

Mild angioedema, flush reaction with vasodilatation, urticaria, pruritus and erythema have been commonly observed.

Toxic skin reactions such as the mucocutaneous syndrome (eg Stevens-Johnson

Meglumine sodium succinate contraindications

Hypersensitivity to antihistamines,

History of agranulocytosis,

Risk of urinary retention due to disorders - Risk of glaucoma angle closure.

What is Potassium chloride?

Potassium chloride (potassium chloride) is used to prevent or to treat low blood levels of potassium (hypokalemia). Potassium levels can be low as a result of a disease or from taking certain medicines, or after a prolonged illness with diarrhea or vomiting.

Potassium chloride contains potassium chloride. Potassium is a mineral that is found in many foods and is needed for several functions of your body, especially the beating of your heart.

Potassium chloride may also be used for other purposes not listed here.

Potassium chloride indications

An indication is a term used for the list of condition or symptom or illness for which the medicine is prescribed or used by the patient. For example, acetaminophen or paracetamol is used for fever by the patient, or the doctor prescribes it for a headache or body pains. Now fever, headache and body pains are the indications of paracetamol. A patient should be aware of the indications of medications used for common conditions because they can be taken over the counter in the pharmacy meaning without prescription by the Physician.

BECAUSE OF REPORTS OF INTESTINAL AND GASTRIC ULCERATION AND BLEEDING WITH CONTROLLED-RELEASE POTASSIUM CHLORIDE PREPARATIONS, THESE DRUGS SHOULD BE RESERVED FOR THOSE PATIENTS WHO CANNOT TOLERATE OR REFUSE TO TAKE LIQUID OR EFFERVESCENT POTASSIUM PREPARATIONS OR FOR PATIENTS IN WHOM THERE IS A PROBLEM OF COMPLIANCE WITH THESE PREPARATIONS.

  1. For the treatment of patients with hypokalemia with or without metabolic alkalosis, in digitalis intoxications, and in patients with hypokalemic familial periodic paralysis. If hypokalemia is the result of diuretic therapy, consideration should be given to the use of a lower dose of diuretic, which may be sufficient without leading to hypokalemia.
  2. For the prevention of hypokalemia in patients who would be at particular risk if hypokalemia were to develop e.g., digitalized patients or patients with significant cardiac arrhythmias, hepatic cirrhosis with ascites, states of aldosterone excess with normal renal function, potassium-losing nephropathy, and certain diarrheal states.

The use of potassium salts in patients receiving diuretics for uncomplicated essential hypertension is often unnecessary when such patients have a normal dietary pattern and when low doses of the diuretic are used. Serum potassium should be checked periodically, however, and if hypokalemia occurs, dietary supplementation with potassium-containing foods may be adequate to control milder cases. In more severe cases, and if dose adjustment of the diuretic is ineffective or unwarranted, supplementation with potassium salts may be indicated.

How should I use Potassium chloride?

Use Potassium chloride as directed by your doctor. Check the label on the medicine for exact dosing instructions.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Potassium chloride.

Uses of Potassium chloride in details

There are specific as well as general uses of a drug or medicine. A medicine can be used to prevent a disease, treat a disease over a period or cure a disease. It can also be used to treat the particular symptom of the disease. The drug use depends on the form the patient takes it. It may be more useful in injection form or sometimes in tablet form. The drug can be used for a single troubling symptom or a life-threatening condition. While some medications can be stopped after few days, some drugs need to be continued for prolonged period to get the benefit from it.

This medication is a mineral supplement used to treat or prevent low amounts of potassium in the blood. A normal level of potassium in the blood is important. Potassium helps your cells, kidneys, heart, muscles, and nerves work properly. Most people get enough potassium by eating a well-balanced diet. Some conditions that can lower your body's potassium level include severe prolonged diarrhea and vomiting, hormone problems such as hyperaldosteronism, or treatment with "water pills"/diuretics.

How to use Potassium chloride

Take this medication by mouth as directed by your doctor. To prevent stomach upset, take each dose with a meal and a full glass of water (8 ounces/240 milliliters) unless your doctor directs you otherwise. Do not lie down for 10 minutes after taking this medication.

Do not crush, chew, or suck extended-release capsules or tablets. Doing so can release all of the drug at once, increasing the risk of side effects. Also, do not split extended-release tablets unless they have a score line and your doctor or pharmacist tells you to do so. Swallow the whole or split tablet without crushing or chewing.

Swallow the capsules whole. If you have trouble swallowing the capsules, tell your doctor or pharmacist. Some brands may be opened and the contents sprinkled onto a spoonful of cool, soft food such as applesauce or pudding. Immediately swallow the food/medication mixture without chewing. Do not prepare the mixture ahead of time. Drink a glass of cool water after each dose to make sure you swallow all the medication. Ask your pharmacist if you have questions about your brand.

Take this medication regularly to get the most benefit from it. To help you remember, take it at the same time(s) each day. The dosage is based on your medical condition and response to treatment. Do not increase your dose or take it more often than prescribed. Do not take more than 20 milliequivalents per dose.

Tell your doctor if your condition does not improve or if you have symptoms of low potassium in the blood (such as irregular heartbeat, muscle weakness/cramps).

Potassium chloride description

A white crystal or crystalline powder used as an electrolyte replenisher, in the treatment of hypokalemia, in buffer solutions, and in fertilizers and explosives.

Potassium chloride dosage

Potassium chloride Dosage

Generic name: potassium chloride 600mg

Dosage form: tablet, film coated, extended release

See also:

The information at Drugs.com is not a substitute for medical advice. Always consult your doctor or pharmacist.

The usual dietary potassium intake by the average adult is 50 to 100 mEq per day. Potassium depletion sufficient to cause hypokalemia usually requires the loss of 200 mEq or more of potassium from the total body store.

Dosage must be adjusted to the individual needs of each patient. The dose for the prevention of hypokalemia is typically in the range of 20 mEq per day. Doses of 40-100 mEq per day or more are used for the treatment of potassium depletion. Dosage should be divided if more than 20 mEq per day is given such that no more than 20 mEq is given in a single dose.

Each Potassium chloride® Extended-release Tablet provides 8 mEq or 10 mEq of potassium chloride.

Potassium chloride® Extended-release Tablets should be taken with meals and with a glass of water or other liquid. This product should not be taken on an empty stomach because of its potential for gastric irritation.

NOTE: Potassium chloride® Extended-release Tablets must be swallowed whole and never crushed, chewed, or sucked.

More about Potassium chloride (potassium chloride)

Consumer resources

Professional resources

Other formulations

Related treatment guides

Potassium chloride interactions

See also:
What other drugs will affect Potassium chloride?

Aliskiren: Potassium Salts may enhance the hyperkalemic effect of Aliskiren. Monitor therapy

Angiotensin II Receptor Blockers: Potassium Salts may enhance the hyperkalemic effect of Angiotensin II Receptor Blockers. Monitor therapy

Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors: Potassium Salts may enhance the hyperkalemic effect of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors. Monitor therapy

Anticholinergic Agents: May enhance the ulcerogenic effect of Potassium Chloride. Management: Patients on drugs with substantial anticholinergic effects should avoid using any solid oral dosage form of potassium chloride. Avoid combination

Drospirenone: Potassium Salts may enhance the hyperkalemic effect of Drospirenone. Monitor therapy

Eplerenone: May enhance the hyperkalemic effect of Potassium Salts. Management: This combination is contraindicated in patients receiving eplerenone for treatment of hypertension. Consider therapy modification

Glycopyrrolate (Systemic): May enhance the adverse/toxic effect of Potassium Chloride. This is specific to solid oral dosage forms of potassium chloride. Avoid combination

Heparin: May enhance the hyperkalemic effect of Potassium Salts. Monitor therapy

Heparins (Low Molecular Weight): May enhance the hyperkalemic effect of Potassium Salts. Monitor therapy

Nicorandil: May enhance the hyperkalemic effect of Potassium Salts. Monitor therapy

Potassium-Sparing Diuretics: Potassium Salts may enhance the hyperkalemic effect of Potassium-Sparing Diuretics. Management: Avoid coadministration of a potassium-sparing diuretic and a potassium salt. This combination should only be used in cases of significant hypokalemia, and only if serum potassium can be closely monitored. Consider therapy modification

Potassium chloride side effects

See also:
What are the possible side effects of Potassium chloride?

One of the most severe adverse effects is hyperkalemia. Gastrointestinal bleeding and ulceration have been reported in patients treated with Potassium chloride (potassium chloride extended-release) ® Extencaps®. In addition to gastrointestinal bleeding and ulceration, perforation and obstruction have been reported in patients treated with other solid KCl dosage forms, and may occur with Potassium chloride (potassium chloride extended-release) ® Extencaps®.

The most common adverse reactions to the oral potassium salts are nausea, vomiting, flatulence, abdominal discomfort, and diarrhea. These symptoms are due to irritation of the gastrointestinal tract and are best managed by taking the dose with meals, or reducing the amount taken at one time. Skin rash has been reported rarely with potassium preparations.

Potassium chloride contraindications

See also:
What is the most important information I should know about Potassium chloride?

Potassium supplements are contraindicated in patients with hyperkalemia since a further increase in serum potassium concentration in such patients can produce cardiac arrest. Hyperkalemia may complicate any of the following conditions: chronic renal failure, systemic acidosis such as diabetic acidosis, acute dehydration, extensive tissue breakdown as in severe burns, adrenal insufficiency, or the administration of a potassium-sparing diuretic, e.g., spironolactone, triamterene, or amiloride.

Potassium chloride (Potassium chloride) tablets are contraindicated in patients with known hypersensitivity to any ingredient in this product.

Controlled-release formulations of potassium chloride have produced esophageal ulceration in certain cardiac patients with esophageal compression due to an enlarged left atrium. Potassium supplementation, when indicated in such patients, should be given as a liquid preparation.

All solid oral dosage forms of potassium chloride are contraindicated in any patient in whom there is structural, pathological, e.g., diabetic gastroparesis, or pharmacologic (use of anticholinergic agents or other agents with anticholinergic properties at sufficient doses to exert anticholinergic effects) cause for arrest or delay in tablet passage through the gastrointestinal tract.

What is Sodium chloride?

Sodium chloride is the chemical name for salt. Sodium chloride can reduce some types of bacteria in certain body secretions, such as saliva.

Sodium chloride inhalation is used to produce sputum (mucus, or phlegm) from the mouth to help improve lung function in people with cystic fibrosis, or to collect sputum for medical testing. This medication may also be used to dilute other medications inhaled through a nebulizer.

Sodium chloride inhalation may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

Sodium chloride indications

An indication is a term used for the list of condition or symptom or illness for which the medicine is prescribed or used by the patient. For example, acetaminophen or paracetamol is used for fever by the patient, or the doctor prescribes it for a headache or body pains. Now fever, headache and body pains are the indications of paracetamol. A patient should be aware of the indications of medications used for common conditions because they can be taken over the counter in the pharmacy meaning without prescription by the Physician.

Sodium chloride as isotonic solution: the dehydration of various origins. To maintain the volume of blood plasma during and after surgery. As a solvent for various drugs.

Hypertonic solution: violations of water-electrolyte metabolism: lack of sodium and chlorine ions; hypoosmotic dehydration of various origins (due to prolonged vomiting, diarrhea, burns with a gastric fistula, pulmonary hemorrhage, intestinal bleeding).

Eye drops and ointment: irritation of the cornea with inflammatory and allergic diseases (combined therapy).

How should I use Sodium chloride?

Use Sodium chloride as directed by your doctor. Check the label on the medicine for exact dosing instructions.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Sodium chloride.

Uses of Sodium chloride in details

There are specific as well as general uses of a drug or medicine. A medicine can be used to prevent a disease, treat a disease over a period or cure a disease. It can also be used to treat the particular symptom of the disease. The drug use depends on the form the patient takes it. It may be more useful in injection form or sometimes in tablet form. The drug can be used for a single troubling symptom or a life-threatening condition. While some medications can be stopped after few days, some drugs need to be continued for prolonged period to get the benefit from it.

This product is used to treat dryness inside the nose (nasal passages). It helps add moisture inside the nose to dissolve and soften thick or crusty mucus. In babies and young children with stuffy noses who cannot blow their noses, using this product helps to make the mucus easier to remove with a nasal bulb syringe. This helps relieve stuffiness and makes breathing easier.

This product contains a purified gentle salt solution (also called saline or sodium chloride solution). It does not contain any medication.

How to use Sodium chloride nasal

Spray this product into each nostril as needed or as directed by your doctor. This product may also be given into the nose as drops or a stream. Follow all directions on the product package. If you are uncertain about any of the information, consult your doctor or pharmacist.

Try not to touch the container tip to the inside of your nose. If this happens, rinse the tip with hot water and dry with a clean tissue before recapping the container.

If your condition persists or worsens, or if you think you may have a serious medical problem, seek immediate medical attention.

Sodium chloride description

Sodium chloride, also known as salt, common salt, table salt or halite, is an ionic compound with the chemical formula NaCl, representing a 1:1 ratio of sodium and chloride ions. Sodium chloride is the salt most responsible for the salinity of seawater and of the extracellular fluid of many multicellular organisms. It is listed on the World Health Organization Model List of Essential Medicines.

Sodium chloride dosage

All injections in VIAFLEX plastic containers are intended for intravenous administration using sterile and nonpyrogenic equipment.

As directed by a physician. Dosage, rate, and duration of administration are to be individualized and depend upon the indication for use, the patient’s age, weight, clinical condition, concomitant treatment, and on the patient’s clinical and laboratory response to treatment.

When other electrolytes or medicines are added to this solution, the dosage and the infusion rate will also be dictated by the dose regimen of the additions.

Parenteral drug products should be inspected visually for particulate matter and discoloration prior to administration whenever solution and container permit. Use of a final filter is recommended during administration of all parenteral solutions, where possible.

Do not administer unless the solution is clear and seal is intact.

Additives may be incompatible with Sodium Chloride Injection, USP. As with all parenteral solutions, compatibility of the additives with the solution must be assessed before addition. Before adding a substance or medication, verify that it is soluble and/or stable in water and that the pH range of Sodium Chloride Injection, USP is appropriate. After addition, check for unexpected color changes and/or the appearance of precipitates, insoluble complexes or crystals.

The instructions for use of the medication to be added and other relevant literature must be consulted. Additives known or determined to be incompatible must not be used. When introducing additives to Sodium Chloride Injection, USP, aseptic technique must be used. Mix the solution thoroughly when additives have been introduced. Do not store solutions containing additives.

After opening the container, the contents should be used immediately and should not be stored for a subsequent infusion. Do not reconnect any partially used containers. Discard any unused portion.

Sodium chloride interactions

See also:
What other drugs will affect Sodium chloride?

Caution must be exercised in the administration of Sodium Chloride Injection, USP to patients receiving corticosteroids or corticotropin.

Studies have not been conducted to evaluate additional drug/drug or drug/food interactions with Sodium Chloride (sodium chloride (sodium chloride injection) injection) Injection, USP.

Sodium chloride side effects

See also:
What are the possible side effects of Sodium chloride?

Post-Marketing Adverse Reactions

The following adverse reactions have been identified during postapproval use of Sodium Chloride Injection, USP. Because these reactions are reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size, it is not always possible to reliably estimate their frequency or establish a causal relationship to drug exposure.

The following adverse reactions have been reported in the post-marketing experience during use of 0.9% Sodium Chloride Injection, USP and include the following:

hypersensitivity/infusion reactions, including hypotension, pyrexia, tremor, chills, urticaria, rash, and pruritus.

Also reported are infusion site reactions, such as infusion site erythema, injection site streaking, burning sensation, and infusion site urticaria.

The following adverse reactions have not been reported with 0.9% Sodium Chloride Injection, USP but may occur: hypernatremia, hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis, and hyponatremia, which may be symptomatic.

Hyponatremia has been reported for 0.45% Sodium Chloride Injection, USP.

The following adverse reactions have not been reported with 0.45% Sodium Chloride Injection, USP but may occur: hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis, hypersensitivity/infusion reactions (including hypotension, pyrexia, tremor, chills, urticaria, rash, and pruritus), and infusion site reactions (such as infusion site erythema, injection site streaking, burning sensation, infusion site urticaria).

If an adverse reaction does occur, discontinue the infusion, evaluate the patient, institute appropriate therapeutic countermeasures and save the remainder of the fluid for examination if deemed necessary.

Sodium chloride contraindications

See also:
What is the most important information I should know about Sodium chloride?

Due to potential toxicity of benzyl alcohol in newborns, Bacteriostatic Sodium Chloride Injection, USP, 0.9% containing benzyl alcohol must not be used in this patient population.

Bacteriostatic Sodium Chloride Injection, USP, 0.9% should not be used for fluid or sodium chloride replacement.

Active ingredient matches for Magnesium chloride/Meglumine sodium succinate/potassium chloride/sodium chloride:

Magnesium chloride/Meglumine sodium succinate/potassium chloride/sodium chloride


References

  1. DailyMed. "AMINO ACIDS; CALCIUM ACETATE; GLYCERIN; MAGNESIUM ACETATE; PHOSPHORIC ACID; POTASSIUM CHLORIDE; SODIUM ACETATE; SODIUM CHLORIDE: DailyMed provides trustworthy information about marketed drugs in the United States. DailyMed is the official provider of FDA label information (package inserts).". https://dailymed.nlm.nih.gov/dailyme... (accessed September 17, 2018).
  2. DailyMed. "MAGNESIUM CHLORIDE: DailyMed provides trustworthy information about marketed drugs in the United States. DailyMed is the official provider of FDA label information (package inserts).". https://dailymed.nlm.nih.gov/dailyme... (accessed September 17, 2018).
  3. PubChem. "Potassium". https://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/com... (accessed September 17, 2018).

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