Neo-Boldolaxine Pregnancy

sponsored
Was this medicine useful for you?

Consists of Boldo, Docusate, Senna

Pregnancy of Docusate (Neo-Boldolaxine) in details

Pregnancy is always a special situation where every action or side effect of the drug varies when compared to a situation of a non-pregnant patient. It is not only because the pregnant woman's metabolism differs due to the hormonal and other changes happened to her, but also because every medicine or its metabolite passes to the baby and shows its action there. The only thing is, be cautious, attentive and well supervised when you take any single drug in pregnancy. The interactions can vary in pregnancy, and the dosage may differ as well. Strict supervision of the Physician is mandatory.
sponsored

Docusate (Neo-Boldolaxine) has not been formally assigned to a pregnancy category by the FDA. Docusate (Neo-Boldolaxine) has been assigned to Risk Factor C by Briggs et al. No congenital defects have been associated with Docusate (Neo-Boldolaxine) use during pregnancy. Docusate (Neo-Boldolaxine) should only be used during pregnancy if there are no other alternatives and the benefit outweighs the risk.

During the Collaborative Perinatal Project, 30 exposures to Docusate (Neo-Boldolaxine) during the first trimester, and 116 exposures to Docusate (Neo-Boldolaxine) anytime during pregnancy were recorded. Malformations were reported in 3 children (2.23 expected). In a review of 229,101 deliveries to Michigan Medicaid patients during 1985 to 1992, 232 first-trimester exposures to Docusate (Neo-Boldolaxine) were recorded and 3003 exposures anytime during pregnancy. A total of 9 birth defects were reported with first trimester exposure (9 expected) and included 1 cardiovascular defect and 1 case of polydactyly. Review of 6589 first trimester exposures in a previous review of data from 1980 to 1983 also revealed no association between Docusate (Neo-Boldolaxine) and congenital abnormalities. (written communication, Franz Rosa, MD, Food and Drug Administration, 1994) A published report of 35 women exposed to Docusate (Neo-Boldolaxine) and dihydroxyanthraquinone also revealed no association between Docusate (Neo-Boldolaxine) and adverse fetal outcome. Hypomagnesemia was discovered within 22 hours of birth in one neonate whose mother had used Docusate (Neo-Boldolaxine), 100 mg per day or more, chronically throughout pregnancy. The mother also exhibited hypomagnesemia until Docusate (Neo-Boldolaxine) use was discontinued.

See references

Docusate (Neo-Boldolaxine) breastfeeding

When a drug is taken when the patient is breast feeding, a part of the drug is secreted in her breast milk and is passed to the baby. The dosage of the medicine to mother and baby are different, and many drugs actions are side effects when you take them without a disease, and what if you the baby takes them without a disease? What if the drug is contraindicated in newborns, infants or children? So, breastfeeding is a very alarming situation when the mother is on medications. Ask your Physician or Pediatrician about the effect of the drug on the baby and how much is excreted in breast milk and if it harms the baby!
sponsored

There are no data on the excretion of Docusate (Neo-Boldolaxine) into human milk. In one study of 35 women receiving a combination of Docusate (Neo-Boldolaxine) and dihydroxyanthraquinone, diarrhea was reported in one nursing infant.

See references

References for pregnancy information

  1. Heinonen O, Slone D, Shapiro S; Kaufman DW ed. "Birth Defects and Drugs in Pregnancy." Littleton, MA: Publishing Sciences Group, Inc. (1977): 297
  2. Greenhalf JO, Leonard HS "Laxatives in the treatment of constipation in pregnant and breast-feeding mothers." Practitioner 210 (1973): 259-63
  3. Schindler AM "Isolated neonatal hypomagnesaemia associated with maternal overuse of stool softener" Lancet 2 (1984): 822

References for breastfeeding information

  1. Greenhalf JO, Leonard HS "Laxatives in the treatment of constipation in pregnant and breast-feeding mothers." Practitioner 210 (1973): 259-63

Pregnancy of Senna (Neo-Boldolaxine) in details

Pregnancy is always a special situation where every action or side effect of the drug varies when compared to a situation of a non-pregnant patient. It is not only because the pregnant woman's metabolism differs due to the hormonal and other changes happened to her, but also because every medicine or its metabolite passes to the baby and shows its action there. The only thing is, be cautious, attentive and well supervised when you take any single drug in pregnancy. The interactions can vary in pregnancy, and the dosage may differ as well. Strict supervision of the Physician is mandatory.

Treatment of constipation in pregnant women is similar to that of non-pregnant patients and medications may be used when diet and lifestyle modifications are not effective. Agents other than Senna (Neo-Boldolaxine) are preferred as initial treatment. Stimulant laxatives, including Senna (Neo-Boldolaxine), are not recommended for chronic use, but may be used intermittently when needed (Christie [ACG 2007]).

Senna (Neo-Boldolaxine) breastfeeding

When a drug is taken when the patient is breast feeding, a part of the drug is secreted in her breast milk and is passed to the baby. The dosage of the medicine to mother and baby are different, and many drugs actions are side effects when you take them without a disease, and what if you the baby takes them without a disease? What if the drug is contraindicated in newborns, infants or children? So, breastfeeding is a very alarming situation when the mother is on medications. Ask your Physician or Pediatrician about the effect of the drug on the baby and how much is excreted in breast milk and if it harms the baby!
sponsored

Senna (Neo-Boldolaxine) is not excreted into human milk. However, Senna (Neo-Boldolaxine) is a prodrug which is metabolized in vivo to the active sennosides (glucosides of rhein). Rhein is excreted into human milk in very small amounts. No adverse effects have been observed in nursing infants. The American Academy of Pediatrics considers Senna (Neo-Boldolaxine) to be compatible with breast-feeding.

See references

References for pregnancy information

  1. Briggs GG, Freeman RK, Yaffe SJ.. "Drugs in Pregnancy and Lactation. 5th ed." Baltimore, MD: Williams & Wilkins (1998):
  2. Shepard TH. "Catalog of Teratogenic Agents 6th" Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press (1989): 574-5

References for breastfeeding information

  1. Greenhalf JO, Leonard HS "Laxatives in the treatment of constipation in pregnant and breastfeeding mothers." Practitioner 210 (1973): 259-63
  2. Shepard TH. "Catalog of Teratogenic Agents 6th" Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press (1989): 574-5
  3. Werthmann ME, Kres SV "Quantitative excretion of senokot in human breast milk." Med Ann Dist Columbia 42 (1973): 4-5
  4. Baldwin WF "Clinical study of Senna (Neo-Boldolaxine) administration to nursing mothers: assessment of effects on infant bowel habits." Can Med Assoc J 89 (1963): 566-8
  5. Briggs GG, Freeman RK, Yaffe SJ.. "Drugs in Pregnancy and Lactation. 5th ed." Baltimore, MD: Williams & Wilkins (1998):
  6. Faber P, Strenge-Hesse A "Relavence of rhein excretion into breast milk." Pharmacology 36(suppl 1) (1988): 212-20



Reviews

Consumer reviews


There are no reviews yet. Be the first to write one!


Your name: 
Email: 
Spam protection:  < Type 5 here

Information checked by Dr. Sachin Kumar, MD Pharmacology

| Privacy Policy
This site does not supply any medicines. It contains prices for information purposes only.
© 2003 - 2021 ndrugs.com All Rights Reserved