Nexmezol Actions

Rating: 2.85 - 14 review(s)
How do you administer this medicine?
sponsored

Actions of Nexmezol in details

The action of the drug on the human body is called Pharmacodynamics in Medical terminology. To produce its effect and to change the pathological process that is happening the body and to reduce the symptom or cure the disease, the medicine has to function in a specific way. The changes it does to the body at cellular level gives the desired result of treating a disease. Drugs act by stimulating or inhibiting a receptor or an enzyme or a protein most of the times. Medications are produced in such a way that the ingredients target the specific site and bring about chemical changes in the body that can stop or reverse the chemical reaction which is causing the disease.
sponsored

Pharmacology: Pharmacodynamics: Mechanism of Action: Nexmezol is a proton-pump inhibitor that suppresses gastric acid secretion by specific inhibition of the H+/K+-ATPase in the gastric parietal cell. The S- and R-isomers are protonated and converted in the acidic compartment of the parietal cell forming the active inhibitor, the achiral sulphenamide. By acting specifically on the proton-pump, thus, reducing gastric acidity, Nexmezol blocks the final step in acid production. This effect is dose-related up to a daily dose of 20-40 mg and leads to inhibition of gastric acid secretion.

Clinical Studies: Healing of Erosive Esophagitis: The healing rates of Nexmezol 20 mg and 40 mg, and omeprazole 20 mg (the approved dose for this indication) were evaluated in patients with endoscopically diagnosed erosive esophagitis in 4 multicenter, double-blind, randomized studies. The healing rates were 68.7-70.5% and 89.9-90.6% for Nexmezol 20 mg, 71.5-81.7% and 92.2-94.1% for Nexmezol 40 mg, and 64.7-69.5% and 84.2-89.8% for omeprazole 20 mg, at weeks 4 and 8, respectively.

Long-Term Maintenance of Healing of Erosive Esophagitis: Two (2) multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled 4-arm trials were conducted in patients with endoscopically confirmed, healed erosive esophagitis to evaluate Nexmezol 40 mg (n=174), 20 mg (n=180), 10 mg (n=168) or placebo (n=171) once daily over 6 months of treatment. No additional clinical benefit was seen with Nexmezol 40 mg over Nexmezol 20 mg. Patients remained in remission significantly longer and the number of recurrences of erosive esophagitis was significantly less in patients treated with Nexmezol compared to placebo. In both studies, the proportion of patients on Nexmezol who remained in remission and were free of heartburn and other gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms was well-differentiated from placebo. In a 3rd multicenter open-label study of 808 patients treated for 12 months with Nexmezol 40 mg, the percentage of patients that maintained healing of erosive esophagitis was 93.7% for 6 months and 89.4% for 1 year.

Symptomatic Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD): Two (2) multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies were conducted in a total of 717 patients comparing 4 weeks of treatment with Nexmezol 20 mg or 40 mg once daily versus placebo for resolution of GERD symptoms. Patients had ≥6-month history of heartburn episodes, no erosive esophagitis by endoscopy, and heartburn on at least 4 of the 7 days immediately preceding randomization. The percentage of patients that were symptom-free of heartburn was significantly higher in the Nexmezol groups compared to placebo at all follow-up visits (weeks 1, 2 and 4). No additional clinical benefit was seen with Nexmezol 40 mg over Nexmezol 20 mg. In 3 European symptomatic GERD trials, Nexmezol 20 and 40 mg and omeprazole 20 mg were evaluated. No significant treatment-related differences were seen.

Helicobacter pylori Eradication in Patients with Duodenal Ulcer Disease: Two (2) multicenter, randomized, double-blind studies were conducted using a 10-day treatment regimen. The 1st study compared Nexmezol 40 mg once daily in combination with amoxicillin 1000 mg twice daily and clarithromycin 500 mg twice daily to Nexmezol 40 mg once daily plus clarithromycin 500 mg twice daily. The 2nd study compared Nexmezol 40 mg once daily in combination with amoxicillin 1000 mg twice daily and clarithromycin 500 mg twice daily to Nexmezol 40 mg once daily. H. pylori eradication rates, defined as at least 2 negative tests and no positive tests from CLOtest, histology and/or culture at 4 weeks post-therapy were significantly higher in the Nexmezol plus amoxicillin and clarithromycin group than in the Nexmezol plus clarithromycin or Nexmezol alone group. The percentage of patients with a healed baseline duodenal ulcer by 4 weeks after the 10-day treatment regimen in the Nexmezol plus amoxicillin and clarithromycin group was 75% (n=156) and 57% (n=60) respectively, in the 1st and the 2nd studies (per-protocol analysis).

Pharmacokinetics: After oral administration of Nexmezol, peak plasma levels (Cmax) occur at approximately 1.5 hrs (Tmax). The Cmax increases proportionally when the dose is increased and there is a 3-fold increase in the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) from 20-40 mg. At repeated once-daily dosing with 40 mg, the systemic bioavailability is approximately 90% compared to 64% after a single dose of 40 mg. The mean exposure (AUC) to Nexmezol increases from 4.32 micromol·hr/L on day 1 to 11.2 micromol·hr/L on day 5 after 40 mg once daily dosing. The AUC after administration of a single 40 mg dose of Nexmezol is decreased by 33-53% after food intake compared to fasting conditions.

Nexmezol should be taken at least 1 hr before meals.

The pharmacokinetic profile of Nexmezol in patients with symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) following repeated once daily administration of 20 mg and 40 mg of Nexmezol for 5 days is similar to that in healthy volunteers.

Nexmezol is 97% bound to plasma proteins. Plasma protein-binding is constant over the concentration range of 2-20 micromol/L. The apparent volume of distribution at steady-state (Vss) in healthy volunteers is approximately 16 L. Nexmezol is extensively metabolized in the liver by the cytochrome P450 (CYP450) enzyme system. The metabolites of Nexmezol lack antisecretory activity. The major part of Nexmezol's metabolism is dependent upon the CYP2C19 isoenzyme which forms the hydroxy and desmethyl metabolites. The remaining amount is dependent on CYP3A4 which forms the sulphone metabolite. CYP2C19 isoenzyme exhibits polymorphism in the metabolism of Nexmezol, since some 3% of Caucasians and 15-20% of Asians lack CYP2C19 and are termed poor metabolizers. At steady-state, the ratio of AUC in poor metabolizers to AUC in the rest of the population (extensive metabolizers) is approximately 2. Following administration of equimolar doses, the S- and R- isomers of are metabolized differently by the liver, resulting in higher plasma levels of the S- than the R-isomer. The plasma elimination half-life (t½) of Nexmezol is 1-1.5 hrs. Less than 1% of parent drug is excreted in the urine. Approximately 80% of an oral dose of Nexmezol is excreted as inactive metabolites in the urine and the remainder is found as inactive metabolites in the feces.

Special Populations: Geriatric: The AUC and Cmax values were slightly higher (25% and 18%, respectively) in the elderly as compared to younger subjects at steady-state. Dosage adjustment based on age is not necessary.

Paediatric: The pharmacokinetics of Nexmezol has not been studied in patients <18 years.

Gender: The AUC and Cmax values were slightly higher (13%) in females than in males at steady-state. Dosage adjustment based on gender is not necessary.

Hepatic Insufficiency: In patients with mild and moderate hepatic insufficiency, the AUCs of Nexmezol are within the range that could be expected in patients with normal liver function. In patients with severe hepatic insufficiency, the AUCs are 2-3 times higher than in the patients with normal liver function. No dosage adjustment is recommended for patients with mild to moderate hepatic insufficiency (Child-Pugh classes A and B). However, in patients with severe hepatic insufficiency (Child-Pugh class C), a dose of 20 mg once daily should not be exceeded.

Renal Insufficiency: The pharmacokinetics of Nexmezol in patients with renal impairment are not expected to be altered relative to healthy volunteers as <1% of Nexmezol is excreted unchanged in urine.

How should I take Nexmezol?

Take Nexmezol strontium exactly as directed by your doctor. Do not take more of it, do not take it more often, and do not take it for a longer time than your doctor ordered.

Nexmezol strontium comes with a Medication Guide. Read and follow the instructions carefully. Ask your doctor if you have any questions.

It may take several days before Nexmezol strontium begins to relieve stomach pain. To help relieve this pain, antacids may be taken with Nexmezol strontium, unless your doctor has told you not to use them.

Take Nexmezol strontium at least 1 hour before a meal and for the full time of treatment, even if you begin to feel better after a few days.

If you are taking Nexmezol strontium to treat an ulcer with an H. pylori infection, take it together with the antibiotics (eg, amoxicillin, clarithromycin).

To use the capsule:

To use the capsule with a nasogastric (NG) tube:

Dosing

The dose of Nexmezol strontium will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of Nexmezol strontium. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so.

The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the time allowed between doses, and the length of time you take the medicine depend on the medical problem for which you are using the medicine.

Missed Dose

If you miss a dose of Nexmezol strontium, take it as soon as possible. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not double doses.

Storage

Store the medicine in a closed container at room temperature, away from heat, moisture, and direct light. Keep from freezing.

Keep out of the reach of children.

Do not keep outdated medicine or medicine no longer needed.

Ask your healthcare professional how you should dispose of any medicine you do not use.

Nexmezol administration

Administration of drug is important to know because the drug absorption and action varies depending on the route and time of administration of the drug. A medicine is prescribed before meals or after meals or along with meals. The specific timing of the drug intake about food is to increase its absorption and thus its efficacy. Few work well when taken in empty stomach and few medications need to be taken 1 or 2 hrs after the meal. A drug can be in the form of a tablet, a capsule which is the oral route of administration and the same can be in IV form which is used in specific cases. Other forms of drug administration can be a suppository in anal route or an inhalation route.
sponsored

Take exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

This medicine is usually given for 4 to 8 weeks only. Your doctor may recommend a second course of treatment if you need additional healing time.

Take each dose with a full glass (8 ounces) of water.

Nexmezol should be taken at least one hour before a meal.

Do not crush, chew, break, or open a delayed-release capsule. Swallow it whole. Breaking or opening the pill may cause too much of the drug to be released at one time.

You may open the delayed-release capsule and sprinkle the medicine into a spoonful of pudding or applesauce to make swallowing easier. Swallow this mixture right away without chewing. Do not save the mixture for later use. Discard the empty capsule.

Nexmezol can be given through a nasogastric (NG) feeding tube. Open the capsule and sprinkle the medicine into a 60-milliliter syringe. Mix in 50 milliliters of water. Place the plunger into the syringe and shake the mixture well. Make sure there are no medicine granules stuck in the tip of the syringe. Attach the syringe to the NG tube and push the plunger down to empty the syringe into the tube. Then flush the tube with more water to wash the contents down.

Take this medication for the full prescribed length of time. Your symptoms may improve before the condition is fully treated.

Call your doctor if your symptoms do not improve or if they get worse while you are taking this medicine.

This medication can cause unusual results with certain medical tests. Tell any doctor who treats you that you are using Nexmezol.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

Nexmezol pharmacology

Pharmacokinetics of a drug can be defined as what body does to the drug after it is taken. The therapeutic result of the medicine depends upon the Pharmacokinetics of the drug. It deals with the time taken for the drug to be absorbed, metabolized, the process and chemical reactions involved in metabolism and about the excretion of the drug. All these factors are essential to deciding on the efficacy of the drug. Based on these pharmacokinetic principles, the ingredients, the Pharmaceutical company decides dose and route of administration. The concentration of the drug at the site of action which is proportional to therapeutic result inside the body depends on various pharmacokinetic reactions that occur in the body.
sponsored

Mechanism of Action

Nexmezol is a proton pump inhibitor that suppresses gastric acid secretion by specific inhibition of the H+/K+-ATPase in the gastric parietal cell. The S- and R-isomers of omeprazole are protonated and converted in the acidic compartment of the parietal cell forming the active inhibitor, the achiral sulphenamide. By acting specifically on the proton pump, Nexmezol blocks the final step in acid production, thus reducing gastric acidity. This effect is dose-related up to a daily dose of 20 to 40 mg and leads to inhibition of gastric acid secretion.

Pharmacodynamics

Antisecretory Activity

The effect of Nexmezol magnesium on intragastric pH was determined in patients with symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux disease in two separate studies. In the first study of 36 patients, Nexmezol magnesium 40 mg and 20 mg capsules were administered over 5 days. The results are shown in Table 3:

Table 3: Effect on Intragastric pH on Day 5 (N = 36)

*
Gastric pH was measured over a 24 hour period
p < 0.01 Nexmezol magnesium 40 mg vs. Nexmezol magnesium 20 mg

Parameter

Nexmezol Magnesium

40 mg

Nexmezol Magnesium

20 mg

% Time Gastric pH > 4* (Hours)

70%†

(16.8 h)

53%

(12.7 h)

Coefficient of variation

26%

37%

Median 24 Hour pH

4.9†

4.1

Coefficient of variation

16%

27%

In a second study, the effect on intragastric pH of Nexmezol magnesium 40 mg administered once daily over a five day period was similar to the first study, (% time with pH > 4 was 68% or 16.3 hours).

Serum Gastrin Effects

The effect of Nexmezol magnesium on serum gastrin concentrations was evaluated in approximately 2,700 patients in clinical trials up to 8 weeks and in over 1,300 patients for up to 6 to 12 months. The mean fasting gastrin level increased in a dose-related manner. This increase reached a plateau within two to three months of therapy and returned to baseline levels within four weeks after discontinuation of therapy.

Increased gastrin causes enterochromaffin-like cell hyperplasia and increased serum Chromogranin A (CgA) levels. The increased CgA levels may cause false positive results in diagnostic investigations for neuroendocrine tumors. Healthcare providers should temporarily stop Nexmezol treatment at least 14 days before assessing CgA levels and consider repeating the test if initial CgA levels are high.

Enterochromaffin-like (ECL) Cell Effects

In 24 month carcinogenicity studies of omeprazole in rats, a dose-related significant occurrence of gastric ECL cell carcinoid tumors and ECL cell hyperplasia was observed in both male and female animals. Carcinoid tumors have also been observed in rats subjected to fundectomy or long-term treatment with other proton pump inhibitors or high doses of H2-receptor antagonists.

Human gastric biopsy specimens have been obtained from more than 3,000 patients (both children and adults) treated with omeprazole in long-term clinical trials. The incidence of ECL cell hyperplasia in these studies increased with time; however, no case of ECL cell carcinoids, dysplasia, or neoplasia has been found in these patients.

In over 1,000 patients treated with Nexmezol magnesium (10, 20 or 40 mg/day) up to 6 to 12 months, the prevalence of ECL cell hyperplasia increased with time and dose. No patient developed ECL cell carcinoids, dysplasia, or neoplasia in the gastric mucosa.

Endocrine Effects

Nexmezol magnesium had no effect on thyroid function when given in oral doses of 20 or 40 mg for 4 weeks. Other effects of Nexmezol magnesium on the endocrine system were assessed using omeprazole studies. Omeprazole given in oral doses of 30 or 40 mg for 2 to 4 weeks had no effect on carbohydrate metabolism, circulating levels of parathyroid hormone, cortisol, estradiol, testosterone, prolactin, cholecystokinin, or secretin.

Pharmacokinetics

Absorption

Nexmezol magnesium delayed-release capsules and Nexmezol magnesium for delayed-release oral suspension contain a bioequivalent enteric-coated granule formulation of Nexmezol magnesium. Bioequivalency is based on a single dose (40 mg) study in 94 healthy male and female volunteers under fasting condition. After oral administration, peak plasma levels (Cmax) occur at approximately 1.5 hours (Tmax). The Cmax increases proportionally when the dose is increased, and there is a three-fold increase in the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) from 20 to 40 mg. At repeated once-daily dosing with 40 mg, the systemic bioavailability is approximately 90% compared to 64% after a single dose of 40 mg. The mean exposure (AUC) to Nexmezol increases from 4.32 micromol*hr/L on Day 1 to 11.2 micromol*hr/L on Day 5 after 40 mg once daily dosing.

The AUC after administration of a single 40 mg dose of Nexmezol magnesium is decreased by 43% to 53% after food intake compared to fasting conditions. Nexmezol magnesium should be taken at least one hour before meals.

The pharmacokinetic profile of Nexmezol magnesium was determined in 36 patients with symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux disease following repeated once daily administration of 20 mg and 40 mg capsules of Nexmezol magnesium over a period of five days. The results are shown in Table 4:

Table 4: Pharmacokinetic Parameters of Nexmezol Magnesium on Day 5 Following

Oral Dosing for 5 Days

*
Values represent the geometric mean, except the Tmax, which is the arithmetic mean; CV = Coefficient of variation

Parameter*(CV)

Nexmezol Magnesium

40 mg

Nexmezol Magnesium

20 mg

AUC (micromol·h/L)

12.6 (42%)

4.2 (59%)

Cmax (micromol/L)

4.7 (37%)

2.1 (45%)

Tmax (h)

1.6

1.6

t1/2 (h)

1.5

1.2

Distribution

Nexmezol is 97% bound to plasma proteins. Plasma protein binding is constant over the concentration range of 2 to 20 micromol/L. The apparent volume of distribution at steady state in healthy volunteers is approximately 16 L.

Elimination

Metabolism

Nexmezol is extensively metabolized in the liver by the cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzyme system. The metabolites of Nexmezol lack antisecretory activity. The major part of Nexmezol’s metabolism is dependent upon the CYP2C19 isoenzyme, which forms the hydroxy and desmethyl metabolites. The remaining amount is dependent on CYP3A4 which forms the sulphone metabolite. CYP2C19 isoenzyme exhibits polymorphism in the metabolism of Nexmezol, since some 3% of Caucasians and 15 to 20% of Asians lack CYP2C19 and are termed Poor Metabolizers. At steady state, the ratio of AUC in Poor Metabolizers to AUC in the rest of the population (Extensive Metabolizers) is approximately 2.

Following administration of equimolar doses, the S- and R-isomers are metabolized differently by the liver, resulting in higher plasma levels of the S- than of the R-isomer.

Excretion

The plasma elimination half-life of Nexmezol is approximately 1 to 1.5 hours. Less than 1% of parent drug is excreted in the urine. Approximately 80% of an oral dose of Nexmezol is excreted as inactive metabolites in the urine, and the remainder is found as inactive metabolites in the feces.

Combination Therapy With Antimicrobials

Nexmezol magnesium 40 mg once daily was given in combination with clarithromycin 500 mg twice daily and amoxicillin 1000 mg twice daily for 7 days to 17 healthy male and female subjects. The mean steady state AUC and Cmax of Nexmezol increased by 70% and 18%, respectively during triple combination therapy compared to treatment with Nexmezol alone. The observed increase in Nexmezol exposure during coadministration with clarithromycin and amoxicillin is not expected to produce significant safety concerns.

The pharmacokinetic parameters for clarithromycin and amoxicillin were similar during triple combination therapy and administration of each drug alone. However, the mean AUC and Cmax for 14-hydroxyclarithromycin increased by 19% and 22%, respectively, during triple combination therapy compared to treatment with clarithromycin alone. This increase in exposure to 14-hydroxyclarithromycin is not considered to be clinically significant.

Concomitant Use with Clopidogrel

Results from a crossover study in healthy subjects have shown a pharmacokinetic interaction between clopidogrel (300 mg loading dose/75 mg daily maintenance dose) and Nexmezol (40 mg p.o. once daily) when coadministered for 30 days. Exposure to the active metabolite of clopidogrel was reduced by 35% to 40% over this time period. Pharmacodynamic parameters were also measured and demonstrated that the change in inhibition of platelet aggregation was related to the change in the exposure to clopidogrel active metabolite.

Concomitant Use with Mycophenolate Mofetil

Administration of omeprazole 20 mg twice daily for 4 days and a single 1000 mg dose of MMF approximately one hour after the last dose of omeprazole to 12 healthy subjects in a cross-over study resulted in a 52% reduction in the Cmax and 23% reduction in the AUC of MPA.

Specific Populations

Age: Geriatric Population

The AUC and Cmax values were slightly higher (25% and 18%, respectively) in the elderly as compared to younger subjects at steady state. Dosage adjustment based on age is not necessary.

Age: Pediatric Population

1 to 11 Years of Age

The pharmacokinetics of Nexmezol were studied in pediatric patients with GERD aged 1 to 11 years. Following once daily dosing for 5 days, the total exposure (AUC) for the 10 mg dose in patients aged 6 to 11 years was similar to that seen with the 20 mg dose in adults and adolescents aged 12 to 17 years. The total exposure for the 10 mg dose in patients aged 1 to 5 years was approximately 30% higher than the 10 mg dose in patients aged 6 to 11 years. The total exposure for the 20 mg dose in patients aged 6 to 11 years was higher than that observed with the 20 mg dose in 12 to 17 year-olds and adults, but lower than that observed with the 40 mg dose in 12 to 17 year-olds and adults. See Table 6.

Table 6: Summary of PK Parameters in 1 to 11 Year Olds with GERD Following 5 Days of Once-Daily

Oral Nexmezol Treatment

*
Geometric mean
Arithmetic mean

1 to 5 Year Olds

6 to 11 Year Olds

Parameter

10 mg (N = 8)

10 mg (N = 7)

20 mg (N = 6)

AUC (micromol·h/L)*

4.83

3.70

6.28

Cmax (micromol/L)*

2.98

1.77

3.73

tmax (h)†

1.44

1.79

1.75

t½λz (h)*

0.74

0.88

0.73

Cl/F (L/h)*

5.99

7.84

9.22

12 to 17 Years of Age

The pharmacokinetics of Nexmezol magnesium were studied in 28 adolescent patients with GERD aged 12 to 17 years inclusive, in a single center study. Patients were randomized to receive Nexmezol magnesium 20 mg or 40 mg once daily for 8 days. Mean Cmax and AUC values of Nexmezol were not affected by body weight or age; and more than dose-proportional increases in mean Cmax and AUC values were observed between the two dose groups in the study. Overall, Nexmezol magnesium pharmacokinetics in adolescent patients aged 12 to 17 years were similar to those observed in adult patients with symptomatic GERD. See Table 7.

Table 7: Comparison of PK Parameters in 12 to 17 Year Olds with GERD and Adults With Symptomatic GERD Following the Repeated Daily

Oral Dose Administration of Esomeprazole1

12 to 17 Year Olds (N = 28)

Adults (N = 36)

20 mg

40 mg

20 mg

40 mg

AUC (micromol·h/L)

3.65

13.86

4.2

12.6

Cmax (micromol/L)

1.45

5.13

2.1

4.7

tmax (h)

2

1.75

1.6

1.6

t½λz (h)

0.82

1.22

1.2

1.5

Data presented are geometric means for AUC, Cmax and t½λz, and median value for tmax.

1. Duration of treatment for 12 to 17 year olds and adults were 8 days and 5 days, respectively. Data were obtained from two independent studies.

Gender

The AUC and Cmax values were slightly higher (13%) in females than in males at steady state. Dosage adjustment based on gender is not necessary.

Hepatic Insufficiency

The steady state pharmacokinetics of Nexmezol obtained after administration of 40 mg once daily to 4 patients each with mild (Child-Pugh Class A), moderate (Child-Pugh Class B), and severe (Child-Pugh Class C) liver insufficiency were compared to those obtained in 36 male and female GERD patients with normal liver function. In patients with mild and moderate hepatic insufficiency, the AUCs were within the range that could be expected in patients with normal liver function. In patients with severe hepatic insufficiency the AUCs were 2 to 3 times higher than in the patients with normal liver function. No dosage adjustment is recommended for patients with mild to moderate hepatic insufficiency (Child-Pugh Classes A and B). However, in patients with severe hepatic insufficiency (Child-Pugh Class C) a dose of 20 mg once daily should not be exceeded.

Renal Insufficiency

The pharmacokinetics of Nexmezol magnesium in patients with renal impairment are not expected to be altered relative to healthy volunteers as less than 1% of Nexmezol is excreted unchanged in urine.

Other Pharmacokinetic Observations

Coadministration of oral contraceptives, diazepam, phenytoin, or quinidine did not seem to change the pharmacokinetic profile of Nexmezol.

Studies evaluating concomitant administration of Nexmezol and either naproxen (non-selective NSAID) or rofecoxib (COX-2 selective NSAID) did not identify any clinically relevant changes in the pharmacokinetic profiles of Nexmezol or these NSAIDs.

Microbiology

Nexmezol magnesium, amoxicillin, and clarithromycin triple therapy has been shown to be active against most strains of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) in vitro and in clinical infections.

Helicobacter pylori: Susceptibility testing of H. pylori isolates was performed for amoxicillin and clarithromycin using agar dilution methodology, and minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined.

Pretreatment Resistance: Clarithromycin pretreatment resistance rate (MIC ≥ 1 mcg/mL) to H. pylori was 15% (66/445) at baseline in all treatment groups combined. A total of > 99% (394/395) of patients had H. pylori isolates that were considered to be susceptible (MIC ≤ 0.25 mcg/mL) to amoxicillin at baseline. One patient had a baseline H. pylori isolate with an amoxicillin MIC = 0.5 mcg/mL.

Clarithromycin Susceptibility Test Results and Clinical/Bacteriologic Outcomes: The baseline H. pylori clarithromycin susceptibility results and the H. pylori eradication results at the Day 38 visit are shown in Table 8:

Table 8: Clarithromycin Susceptibility Test Results and Clinical/Bacteriological Outcomes1 for Triple Therapy - (Nexmezol magnesium 40 mg once daily/amoxicillin 1000 mg twice daily/clarithromycin 500 mg twice daily for 10 days)

Clarithromycin

Pretreatment

Results

H. pylori negative

(Eradicated)

H. pylori positive

(Not Eradicated)

Post-treatment susceptibility results

S2

I2

R2

No MIC

Susceptible2 182

162

4

0

2

14

Intermediate2 1

1

0

0

0

0

Resistant2 29

13

1

0

13

2

1.
Includes only patients with pretreatment and post-treatment clarithromycin susceptibility test results
2.
Susceptible (S) MIC ≤ 0.25 mcg/mL, Intermediate (I) MIC = 0.5 mcg/mL, Resistant (R) MIC ≥ 1 mcg/mL

Patients not eradicated of H. pylori following Nexmezol magnesium/amoxicillin/clarithromycin triple therapy will likely have clarithromycin resistant H. pylori isolates. Therefore, clarithromycin susceptibility testing should be done, when possible. Patients with clarithromycin resistant H. pylori should not be re-treated with a clarithromycin-containing regimen.

Amoxicillin Susceptibility Test Results and Clinical/Bacteriological Outcomes: In the Nexmezol magnesium/amoxicillin/clarithromycin clinical trials, 83% (176/212) of the patients in the Nexmezol magnesium/amoxicillin/clarithromycin treatment group who had pretreatment amoxicillin susceptible MICs (≤ 0.25 mcg/mL) were eradicated of H. pylori, and 17% (36/212) were not eradicated of H. pylori. Of the 36 patients who were not eradicated of H. pylori on triple therapy, 16 had no post-treatment susceptibility test results and 20 had post-treatment H. pylori isolates with amoxicillin susceptible MICs. Fifteen of the patients who were not eradicated of H. pylori on triple therapy also had post-treatment H. pylori isolates with clarithromycin resistant MICs. There were no patients with H. pylori isolates who developed treatment emergent resistance to amoxicillin.

Susceptibility Test for Helicobacter pylori: For susceptibility testing information about Helicobacter pylori, see Microbiology section in prescribing information for clarithromycin and amoxicillin.

Effects on Gastrointestinal Microbial Ecology: Decreased gastric acidity due to any means, including proton pump inhibitors, increases gastric counts of bacteria normally present in the gastrointestinal tract. Treatment with proton pump inhibitors may lead to slightly increased risk of gastrointestinal infections such as Salmonella and Campylobacter and possibly Clostridium difficile in hospitalized patients.



References

  1. DailyMed. "ESOMEPRAZOLE STRONTIUM: DailyMed provides trustworthy information about marketed drugs in the United States. DailyMed is the official provider of FDA label information (package inserts).". https://dailymed.nlm.nih.gov/dailyme... (accessed September 17, 2018).
  2. NCIt. "Esomeprazole: NCI Thesaurus (NCIt) provides reference terminology for many systems. It covers vocabulary for clinical care, translational and basic research, and public information and administrative activities.". https://ncit.nci.nih.gov/ncitbrowser... (accessed September 17, 2018).
  3. EPA DSStox. "Esomeprazole: DSSTox provides a high quality public chemistry resource for supporting improved predictive toxicology.". https://comptox.epa.gov/dashboard/ds... (accessed September 17, 2018).

Reviews

The results of a survey conducted on ndrugs.com for Nexmezol are given in detail below. The results of the survey conducted are based on the impressions and views of the website users and consumers taking Nexmezol. We implore you to kindly base your medical condition or therapeutic choices on the result or test conducted by a physician or licensed medical practitioners.

User reports

24 consumers reported administration

When best can I take Nexmezol, on an empty stomach, before or after food?
ndrugs.com website users have also released a report stating that Nexmezol should be taken Empty stomach. In any case, this may not be the right description on how you ought to take this Nexmezol. Kindly visit your doctor for more medical advice in this regard. Click here to see other users view on when best the Nexmezol can be taken.
Users%
Empty stomach14
58.3%
Before food7
29.2%
After food2
8.3%
With a meal1
4.2%


Consumer reviews

Deborah P Mbatha15 Jun 2016 01:35
I am suffering from the severe erosive GERD feel like vomitting I was admitted at the hospital for gastroscop the results were sores that caused by stomach acid and something like stomach bug in the bile which causes acid problem I was given nexmezol tablets 40MG to be taken daily it's been 12days now but my chest is still aching but the oesofugus is now better than before thank you for the word of encouragement that I must continue to take the drug because the problem won't go in a day


Your name: 
Email: 
Spam protection:  < Type 27 here

Information checked by Dr. Sachin Kumar, MD Pharmacology

| Privacy Policy
This site does not supply any medicines. It contains prices for information purposes only.
© 2003 - 2022 ndrugs.com All Rights Reserved