Pd-Cal Overdose

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Consists of Calcium Carbonate, Vitamin D3

What happens if I overdose Calcium Carbonate (Pd-Cal)?

Contact 1-800-222-1222 (the American Association of Poison Control Centers), your local, or emergency room immediately. Symptoms may include confusion; delirium; loss of consciousness; mood or mental changes.

Proper storage of Calcium Carbonate (Pd-Cal):

Store Calcium Carbonate (Pd-Cal) at room temperature, between 59 and 86 degrees F (15 and 30 degrees C). Store away from heat, moisture, and light. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep Calcium Carbonate (Pd-Cal) out of the reach of children and away from pets.

Overdose of Calcium Carbonate (Pd-Cal) in details

When a dose is taken in higher dose than the recommended doses, it is called Overdose. Overdose always needs a clinical supervision. Any medicine or drug when consumed in Overdose produces untoward side effects on one or various organs in the body. A medicine is excreted in the kidney or metabolized in the liver most of the times. This process goes without any hurdles when taken in normal dose, but when taken in an overdose, the body is not able to metabolize it or send it out properly which causes the effects of anoverdose.
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If someone has overdosed and has serious symptoms such as passing out or trouble breathing, call 911. Otherwise, call a poison control center right away. US residents can call their local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222. Canada residents can call a provincial poison control center. Symptoms of overdose may include: nausea/vomiting, loss of appetite, mental/mood changes, headache, drowsiness, weakness, tiredness.

Notes

Keep all regular medical and laboratory appointments. If your doctor has directed you to take this medication, laboratory and/or medical tests (e.g., calcium levels) should be performed periodically to monitor your progress or check for side effects. Consult your doctor for more details.

Foods rich in vitamin D include: fortified dairy products, eggs, sardines, cod liver oil, chicken livers, and fatty fish. Vitamin D is also made by the body as a result of exposure to the sun.

Foods rich in calcium include: dairy products (e.g., milk, yogurt, cheese, ice cream), dark-green leafy vegetables (e.g., broccoli, spinach, bok choy), and calcium-fortified foods (e.g., orange juice).

You can decrease the risk of bone disease by being physically active, not smoking, and avoiding the use of alcohol/caffeine.

Missed Dose

If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you remember. If it is near the time of the next dose, skip the missed dose and resume your usual dosing schedule. Do not double the dose to catch up.

Storage

Store at room temperature away from light and moisture. See packaging for the exact temperature range. If you have any questions about storage, ask your pharmacist. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep all medicines away from children and pets.

Do not flush medications down the toilet or pour them into a drain unless instructed to do so. Properly discard this product when it is expired or no longer needed. Consult your pharmacist or local waste disposal company for more details about how to safely discard your product.

What should I avoid while taking Calcium Carbonate (Pd-Cal)?

If you take other medicines, do not take Calcium Carbonate (Pd-Cal) without first talking to your doctor.

Calcium Carbonate (Pd-Cal) warnings

Warnings are a mix of Precautions. Contraindications and interactions and serious harmful effects associated with the medicine intake. A diabetic or Hypertensive patient need to be warned about few drug interactions. A known hypersensitivity patient needs to be careful about the reactions or anaphylactic shock. A pregnant woman or a breastfeeding woman should be warned of certain medications. A Hepatitis [liver disease] patient or a cardiac patient should avoid few drugs.
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Before taking Calcium Carbonate (Pd-Cal),

* tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to Calcium Carbonate (Pd-Cal) or any other drugs.

* tell your doctor and pharmacist what prescription and nonprescription medications you are taking, especially digoxin (Lanoxin), etidronate (Didronel), phenytoin (Dilantin), tetracycline (Sumycin), and vitamins. Do not take Calcium Carbonate (Pd-Cal) within 1-2 hours of taking other medicines. Calcium may decrease the effectiveness of the other medicine.

* tell your doctor if you have or have ever had kidney disease or stomach conditions.

* tell your doctor if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding. If you become pregnant while taking Calcium Carbonate (Pd-Cal), call your doctor.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Calcium Carbonate (Pd-Cal)?

Some medical conditions may interact with Calcium Carbonate (Pd-Cal). Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

Some MEDICINES MAY INTERACT with Calcium Carbonate (Pd-Cal). Tell your health care provider if you are taking any other medicines, especially any of the following:

This may not be a complete list of all interactions that may occur. Ask your health care provider if Calcium Carbonate (Pd-Cal) may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.

Calcium Carbonate (Pd-Cal) precautions

Certain people who are very sick or very old or who are sensitive show an exacerbation of side effect of the drug which can turn dangerous at times. So, it is very important to remember the precautions while taking the medicine. Pregnancy and Breastfeeding are also special categories wherein extra care or precaution is needed when taking a drug. Few patients may have a hypersensitivity reaction to few medications, and that can be life-threatening rarely. Penicillin hypersensitivity is one example. Diarrhea, rashes are few other symptoms which need a watch. A patient with other co-existing diseases like liver disease, heart disease, kidney disease should take special precautions.
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Concerns related to adverse effects:

• Gastrointestinal effects: Constipation, bloating, and gas are common with calcium supplements (especially carbonate salt) (IOM 2011).

• Hypercalcemia: Chronic hypercalcemia may result in generalized vascular and soft tissue calcification, exacerbate nephrolithiasis, and has been associated with increased mortality in adults with chronic kidney disease (CKD) (KDIGO 2017).

Disease-related concerns:

• Achlorhydria: Calcium absorption is impaired in achlorhydria; administration is followed by increased gastric acid secretion within 2 hours of administration especially with high doses. Common in the elderly, use an alternate salt (eg, citrate) and administer with food (IOM 2011; Recker 1985).

• Chronic kidney disease: In CKD patients receiving phosphate-lowering treatment, consider using non-calcium-based phosphate-lowering agents (eg, sevelamer, lanthanum) as an alternative to calcium-based phosphate-lowering agents (eg, calcium acetate, Calcium Carbonate (Pd-Cal)) or restricting the dose of the calcium-based phosphate-lowering agents (Allison 2013; KDIGO 2017). A meta-analysis observed a trend towards a decrease in all-cause mortality in CKD patients receiving non-calcium-based phosphate-lowering agents compared with those receiving calcium-based phosphate-lowering agents (Jamal 2013); however, further research is needed to identify causes of mortality and fully assess safety of long-term use based on phosphate-lowering agent type.

• Hypoparathyroid disease: Hypercalcemia and hypercalciuria are most likely to occur in hypoparathyroid patients receiving high doses of vitamin D.

• Kidney stones (calcium-containing): Use caution when administering calcium supplements to patients with a history of kidney stones (IOM 2011).

• Renal insufficiency: Use with caution as these patients are more sensitive or susceptible to the effects of excess calcium (IOM 2011).

Concurrent drug therapy issues:

• Drug-drug interactions: Potentially significant interactions may exist, requiring dose or frequency adjustment, additional monitoring, and/or selection of alternative therapy. Consult drug interactions database for more detailed information.

Other warnings/precautions:

• Appropriate product selection: Multiple salt forms of calcium exist; close attention must be paid to the salt form when ordering and administering calcium; incorrect selection or substitution of one salt for another without proper dosage adjustment may result in serious over or under dosing.

What happens if I miss a dose of Calcium Carbonate (Pd-Cal)?

When you miss a dose, you should take it as soon as you remember, but you should take care that it should be well spaced from the next dose. You should not take an extra dose at the time of the second dose as it will become a double dose. The double dose can give unwanted side effects, so be careful. In chronic conditions or when you have a serious health issue, if you miss a dose, you should inform your health care provider and ask his suggestion.

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. However, if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and take only the next regularly scheduled dose. Do not take a double dose of this medicine unless your doctor directs otherwise.

What happens if I overdose Vitamin D3 (Pd-Cal)?

When a dose is taken in higher dose than the recommended doses, it is called Overdose. Overdose always needs a clinical supervision. Any medicine or drug when consumed in Overdose produces untoward side effects on one or various organs in the body. A medicine is excreted in the kidney or metabolized in the liver most of the times. This process goes without any hurdles when taken in normal dose, but when taken in an overdose, the body is not able to metabolize it or send it out properly which causes the effects of anoverdose.

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222. An overdose of vitamin D can cause serious or life-threatening side effects.

What should I avoid while taking Vitamin D3 (Pd-Cal)?

Do not take other vitamin or mineral supplements unless your doctor has told you to.

Avoid using calcium supplements or antacids without your doctor's advice. Use only the specific type of supplement or antacid your doctor recommends.

Vitamin D3 (Pd-Cal) warnings

Warnings are a mix of Precautions. Contraindications and interactions and serious harmful effects associated with the medicine intake. A diabetic or Hypertensive patient need to be warned about few drug interactions. A known hypersensitivity patient needs to be careful about the reactions or anaphylactic shock. A pregnant woman or a breastfeeding woman should be warned of certain medications. A Hepatitis [liver disease] patient or a cardiac patient should avoid few drugs.
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Patient information for vitamin D analogues (Vitamin D2, Vitamin D3 (Pd-Cal), Calcitriol, and Calcidiol)/p>

The patient and his or her parents or s.o.s. should be informed about compliance with dosage instructions, adherence to instructions about diet and calcium supplementation and avoidance of the use of unapproved nonprescription drugs. Patients should also be carefully informed about the symptoms of hypercalcemia.

The effectiveness of vitamin D therapy is predicated on the assumption that each patient is receiving an adequate daily intake of calcium. Patients are advised to have a dietary intake of calcium at a minimum of 600 mg daily. The U.S. RDA for calcium in adults is 800 mg to 1200 mg.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Vitamin D3 (Pd-Cal)?

Certain people who are very sick or very old or who are sensitive show an exacerbation of side effect of the drug which can turn dangerous at times. So, it is very important to remember the precautions while taking the medicine. Pregnancy and Breastfeeding are also special categories wherein extra care or precaution is needed when taking a drug. Few patients may have a hypersensitivity reaction to few medications, and that can be life-threatening rarely. Penicillin hypersensitivity is one example. Diarrhea, rashes are few other symptoms which need a watch. A patient with other co-existing diseases like liver disease, heart disease, kidney disease should take special precautions.

You should not use cholecalciferol if you have ever had an allergic reaction to vitamin D, or if you have:

To make sure you can safely take cholecalciferol, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

Your cholecalciferol dose needs may change if you are pregnant or breast-feeding. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment, or if you are breast-feeding a baby.

What happens if I miss a dose of Vitamin D3 (Pd-Cal)?

When you miss a dose, you should take it as soon as you remember, but you should take care that it should be well spaced from the next dose. You should not take an extra dose at the time of the second dose as it will become a double dose. The double dose can give unwanted side effects, so be careful. In chronic conditions or when you have a serious health issue, if you miss a dose, you should inform your health care provider and ask his suggestion.

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.



References

  1. DailyMed. "MAGNESIUM OXIDE: DailyMed provides trustworthy information about marketed drugs in the United States. DailyMed is the official provider of FDA label information (package inserts).". https://dailymed.nlm.nih.gov/dailyme... (accessed September 17, 2018).
  2. DailyMed. "CALCIUM CARBONATE; FAMOTIDINE; MAGNESIUM HYDROXIDE: DailyMed provides trustworthy information about marketed drugs in the United States. DailyMed is the official provider of FDA label information (package inserts).". https://dailymed.nlm.nih.gov/dailyme... (accessed September 17, 2018).
  3. DailyMed. "CHOLECALCIFEROL: DailyMed provides trustworthy information about marketed drugs in the United States. DailyMed is the official provider of FDA label information (package inserts).". https://dailymed.nlm.nih.gov/dailyme... (accessed September 17, 2018).

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