Recalcin FORTE Pregnancy

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Consists of calcium carbonate, magnesium hydroxide, vitamin D3, zinc sulphate monohydrate

Pregnancy of Calcium carbonate (Recalcin FORTE) in details

Pregnancy is always a special situation where every action or side effect of the drug varies when compared to a situation of a non-pregnant patient. It is not only because the pregnant woman's metabolism differs due to the hormonal and other changes happened to her, but also because every medicine or its metabolite passes to the baby and shows its action there. The only thing is, be cautious, attentive and well supervised when you take any single drug in pregnancy. The interactions can vary in pregnancy, and the dosage may differ as well. Strict supervision of the Physician is mandatory.
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Calcium carbonate (Recalcin FORTE) has not been formally assigned to a pregnancy category by the FDA. Animal reproductive studies and data from controlled human studies are not available. Calcium carbonate (Recalcin FORTE) is commonly used safely to provide calcium supplementation during human pregnancy. Calcium carbonate (Recalcin FORTE) should only be used during pregnancy when benefit outweighs risk.

Calcium is transported across the human placenta. The human fetus is entirely dependent on its mother for the supply of nutrients--including calcium--and oxygen and removal of waste products. Fetal accumulation of calcium occurs mainly during the third trimester. By the end of normal human pregnancy the fetus acquires approximately 28 grams of calcium and 16 grams of phosphorus for skeletal development. The recommended daily calcium supplementation for a pregnant woman averages 1,200 mg (compared to 800 mg/day in the nonpregnant adult), with an additional 250 to 300 mg/day recommended during the last trimester. One quart of milk contains approximately 1,200 mg of calcium; women who do not consume milk or milk products may require calcium supplementation. The milk-alkali syndrome associated with Calcium carbonate (Recalcin FORTE) has been reported during human pregnancy. In one case, after resolution of hypercalcemia, a 31-year-old woman delivered a stillborn fetus with short limbs and low-set ears at 37 weeks' gestation. Chromosomal analysis was normal, and autopsy revealed no evidence of tissue calcification. In another case, a 31-year-old woman delivered a normal 2,950 gram male infant.

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Calcium carbonate (Recalcin FORTE) breastfeeding

When a drug is taken when the patient is breast feeding, a part of the drug is secreted in her breast milk and is passed to the baby. The dosage of the medicine to mother and baby are different, and many drugs actions are side effects when you take them without a disease, and what if you the baby takes them without a disease? What if the drug is contraindicated in newborns, infants or children? So, breastfeeding is a very alarming situation when the mother is on medications. Ask your Physician or Pediatrician about the effect of the drug on the baby and how much is excreted in breast milk and if it harms the baby!
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The calcium content of human milk averages 30 mg/dl. The recommended daily allowance (RDA) for calcium in the lactating woman is 1,200 mg (compared to 400 mg/day in the nonlactating adult). One quart of milk contains approximately 1,200 mg of calcium. Women who do not consume milk or milk products may require calcium supplementation.

There are no data on the excretion of Calcium carbonate (Recalcin FORTE) into human milk. Calcium is considered a normal component of human milk.

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References for pregnancy information

  1. Kleinman GE, Rodriquez H, Good MC, Caudle MR "Hypercalcemic crisis in pregnancy associated with excessive ingestion of Calcium carbonate (Recalcin FORTE) antacid (milk-alkali syndrome): successful treatment with hemodialysis." Obstet Gynecol 78 (1991): 496-9
  2. Picolos MK, Sims CR, Mastrobattista JM, Carroll MA, Lavis VR "Milk-alkali syndrome in pregnancy." Obstet Gynecol 104 (2004): 1201-4
  3. "Product Information. Calci-Chew (Calcium carbonate (Recalcin FORTE))." R & D Laboratories Inc, Marina Del Rey, CA.
  4. Danforth D, Scott J, DiSaia P, Hammond C, Spellacy W, Eds. "Obstetrics and Gynecology, Fifth Edition." JB Lippincott Company, Philadelphia 1 (1986): 181-93
  5. Crawford JS "Maternal and cord blood at delivery. IV. Glucose, sodium, potassium, calcium and chloride." Biol Neonat 8 (1965): 222-37
  6. Ullian ME, Linas SL "The milk-alkali syndrome in pregnancy. Case report." Miner Electrolyte Metab 14 (1988): 208-10

References for breastfeeding information

  1. Danforth D, Scott J, DiSaia P, Hammond C, Spellacy W, Eds. "Obstetrics and Gynecology, Fifth Edition." JB Lippincott Company, Philadelphia 1 (1986): 181-93
  2. "Product Information. Calci-Chew (Calcium carbonate (Recalcin FORTE))." R & D Laboratories Inc, Marina Del Rey, CA.

Pregnancy of Magnesium hydroxide (Recalcin FORTE) in details

Pregnancy is always a special situation where every action or side effect of the drug varies when compared to a situation of a non-pregnant patient. It is not only because the pregnant woman's metabolism differs due to the hormonal and other changes happened to her, but also because every medicine or its metabolite passes to the baby and shows its action there. The only thing is, be cautious, attentive and well supervised when you take any single drug in pregnancy. The interactions can vary in pregnancy, and the dosage may differ as well. Strict supervision of the Physician is mandatory.
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Magnesium hydroxide (Recalcin FORTE) has not been assigned to a pregnancy category by the FDA. There are no controlled data in human pregnancy. Other magnesium salts (such as magnesium sulfate) have been used extensively during pregnancy in large doses with no reports of congenital defects. Magnesium hydroxide (Recalcin FORTE) should only be given in pregnancy when benefit outweighs risk.

See references

Magnesium hydroxide (Recalcin FORTE) breastfeeding

When a drug is taken when the patient is breast feeding, a part of the drug is secreted in her breast milk and is passed to the baby. The dosage of the medicine to mother and baby are different, and many drugs actions are side effects when you take them without a disease, and what if you the baby takes them without a disease? What if the drug is contraindicated in newborns, infants or children? So, breastfeeding is a very alarming situation when the mother is on medications. Ask your Physician or Pediatrician about the effect of the drug on the baby and how much is excreted in breast milk and if it harms the baby!

There are no data on the excretion of Magnesium hydroxide (Recalcin FORTE) into human milk. Because only small amounts of magnesium are systemically absorbed following oral administration of Magnesium hydroxide (Recalcin FORTE), adverse effects in nursing infants would not be expected. The American Academy of Pediatrics considers other magnesium salts (like magnesium sulfate) to be compatible with breast-feeding.

See references

References for pregnancy information

  1. Briggs GG, Freeman RK, Yaffe SJ.. "Drugs in Pregnancy and Lactation. 5th ed." Baltimore, MD: Williams & Wilkins (1998):

References for breastfeeding information

  1. Committee on Drugs, 1992 to 1993 "The transfer of drugs and other chemicals into human milk." Pediatrics 93 (1994): 137-50

Pregnancy of Vitamin D3 (Recalcin FORTE) in details

Pregnancy is always a special situation where every action or side effect of the drug varies when compared to a situation of a non-pregnant patient. It is not only because the pregnant woman's metabolism differs due to the hormonal and other changes happened to her, but also because every medicine or its metabolite passes to the baby and shows its action there. The only thing is, be cautious, attentive and well supervised when you take any single drug in pregnancy. The interactions can vary in pregnancy, and the dosage may differ as well. Strict supervision of the Physician is mandatory.
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Category A: Controlled studies in women fail to demonstrate a risk to the foetus in the 1st trimester (and there is no evidence of a risk in later trimesters), and the possibility of foetal harm remains remote.

References

  1. DailyMed. "MAGNESIUM HYDROXIDE: DailyMed provides trustworthy information about marketed drugs in the United States. DailyMed is the official provider of FDA label information (package inserts).". https://dailymed.nlm.nih.gov/dailyme... (accessed September 17, 2018).
  2. DailyMed. "CALCIUM CARBONATE; FAMOTIDINE; MAGNESIUM HYDROXIDE: DailyMed provides trustworthy information about marketed drugs in the United States. DailyMed is the official provider of FDA label information (package inserts).". https://dailymed.nlm.nih.gov/dailyme... (accessed September 17, 2018).
  3. DailyMed. "CHOLECALCIFEROL: DailyMed provides trustworthy information about marketed drugs in the United States. DailyMed is the official provider of FDA label information (package inserts).". https://dailymed.nlm.nih.gov/dailyme... (accessed September 17, 2018).

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