Calcium/L-lysine/methionine/niacinamide/vitamin B1/vitamin B12/vitamin B2/vitamin B6 Dosage

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Consists of calcium, L-lysine, methionine, niacinamide, vitamin B1, vitamin B12, vitamin B2, vitamin B6

Dosage of Calcium in details

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Caplet Adult 1 caplet 1-2 times daily. Adolescent & childn >8 yr ½ caplet 1-2 times daily. Susp Childn 1-3 tsp once daily.

Calcium interactions

*Major Interaction Do not take this combination

* Ceftriaxone (Rocephin) interacts with CALCIUM

Administering intravenous ceftriaxone and calcium can result in life-threatening damage to the lungs and kidneys. Calcium should not be administered intravenously within 48 hours of intravenous ceftriaxone.

*Moderate Interaction Be cautious with this combination

* Antibiotics (Quinolone antibiotics) interacts with CALCIUM

Calcium might decrease how much antibiotic your body absorbs. Taking calcium along with some antibiotics might decrease the effectiveness of some antibiotics. To avoid this interaction, take calcium supplements at least 1 hour after antibiotics.

Some of these antibiotics that might interact with calcium include ciprofloxacin (Cipro), enoxacin (Penetrex), norfloxacin (Chibroxin, Noroxin), sparfloxacin (Zagam), and trovafloxacin (Trovan).

* Antibiotics (Tetracycline antibiotics) interacts with CALCIUM

Calcium can attach to some antibiotics called tetracyclines in the stomach. This decreases the amount of tetracyclines that can be absorbed. Taking calcium with tetracyclines might decrease the effectiveness of tetracyclines. To avoid this interaction take calcium 2 hours before or 4 hours after taking tetracyclines.

Some tetracyclines include demeclocycline (Declomycin), minocycline (Minocin), and tetracycline (Achromycin, and others).

* Bisphosphonates interacts with CALCIUM

Calcium can decrease how much bisphosphate your body absorbs. Taking calcium along with bisphosphates can decrease the effectiveness of bisphosphate. To avoid this interaction, take bisphosphonate at least 30 minutes before calcium or later in the day.

Some bisphosphonates include alendronate (Fosamax), etidronate (Didronel), risedronate (Actonel), tiludronate (Skelid), and others.

* Calcipotriene (Dovonex) interacts with CALCIUM

Calcipotriene (Dovonex) is a drug that is similar to vitamin D. Vitamin D helps your body absorb calcium. Taking calcium supplements along with calcipotriene (Dovonex) might cause the body to have too much calcium.

* Digoxin (Lanoxin) interacts with CALCIUM

Calcium can affect your heart. Digoxin (Lanoxin) is used to help your heart beat stronger. Taking calcium along with digoxin (Lanoxin) might increase the effects of digoxin (Lanoxin) and lead to an irregular heartbeat. If you are taking digoxin (Lanoxin), talk to your doctor before taking calcium supplements.

* Diltiazem (Cardizem, Dilacor, Tiazac) interacts with CALCIUM

Calcium can affect your heart. Diltiazem (Cardizem, Dilacor, Tiazac) can also affect your heart. Taking large amounts of calcium along with diltiazem (Cardizem, Dilacor, Tiazac) might decrease the effectiveness of diltiazem (Cardizem, Dilacor, Tiazac).

* Levothyroxine interacts with CALCIUM

Levothyroxine is used for low thyroid function. Calcium can decrease how much levothyroxine your body absorbs. Taking calcium along with levothyroxine might decrease the effectiveness of levothyroxine. Levothyroxine and calcium should be taken at least 4 hours apart.

Some brands that contain levothyroxine include Armour Thyroid, Eltroxin, Estre, Euthyrox, Levo-T, Levothroid, Levoxyl, Synthroid, Unithroid, and others.

* Sotalol (Betapace) interacts with CALCIUM

Taking calcium with sotalol (Betapace) can decrease how much sotalol (Betapace) your body absorbs. Taking calcium along with sotalol (Betapace) might decrease the effectiveness of sotalol (Betapace). To avoid this interaction, take calcium at least 2 hours before or 4 hours after taking sotalol (Betapace).

* Verapamil (Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan) interacts with CALCIUM

Calcium can affect your heart. Verapamil (Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan) can also affect your heart. Do not take large amounts of calcium if you are taking verapamil (Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan).

* Water pills (Thiazide diuretics) interacts with CALCIUM

Some "water pills" increase the amount of calcium in your body. Taking large amounts of calcium with some "water pills" might cause there to be too much calcium in the body. This could cause serious side effects, including kidney problems.

Some of these "water pills" include chlorothiazide (Diuril), hydrochlorothiazide (HydroDIURIL, Esidrix), indapamide (Lozol), metolazone (Zaroxolyn), and chlorthalidone (Hygroton).

*Minor Interaction Be watchful with this combination

* Estrogens interacts with CALCIUM

Estrogen helps your body absorb calcium. Taking estrogen pills along with large amounts of calcium might increase calcium in the body too much.

Estrogen pills include conjugated equine estrogens (Premarin), ethinyl estradiol, estradiol, and others.

* Medications for high blood pressure (Calcium channel blockers) interacts with CALCIUM

Some medications for high blood pressure affect calcium in your body. These medications are called calcium channel blockers. Getting calcium injections might decrease the effectiveness of these medications for high blood pressure.

Some medications for high blood pressure include nifedipine (Adalat, Procardia), verapamil (Calan, Isoptin, Verelan), diltiazem (Cardizem), isradipine (DynaCirc), felodipine (Plendil), amlodipine (Norvasc), and others.

Methionine interactions

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Acetaminophen and methotrexate - L-methionine may decrease hepatic toxicity in those with acetaminophen overdosage or in those taking methotrexate. Theoretically, it may decrease hepatic toxicity in the case of other potential hepatotoxic drugs, as well. Gentamicin - Methionine may protect against the ototoxic effects of gentamicin.

Dosage of Niacinamide in details

Niacinamide Dosage

Applies to the following strengths: 100 mg; 500 mg

Usual Adult Dose for:

Usual Pediatric Dose for:

Additional dosage information:

Usual Adult Dose for Niacin Deficiency

Recommended Daily Allowances (RDA):

Males: 19 mg orally each day

Females: 13 mg orally each day

Initial dose: 100 mg orally 3 times a day, with or after meals

Maintenance dose: 100 to 500 mg orally up to 3 times a day, with or after meals

Niacinamide has toxic potential at adult doses in excess of 3 g/day.

Niacinamide may also be administered parenterally as a component of injectable multivitamin additives contained in parenteral nutrition products. All existing parenteral vitamin products for adults contain 40 mg/vial, which is the dose recommended by the American Medical Association/Nutrition Advisory Group for patients 11 years and older requiring parenteral vitamins.

Usual Adult Dose for Pemphigus

Recommended Daily Allowances (RDA):

Males: 19 mg orally each day

Females: 13 mg orally each day

Initial dose: 100 mg orally 3 times a day, with or after meals

Maintenance dose: 100 to 500 mg orally up to 3 times a day, with or after meals

Niacinamide has toxic potential at adult doses in excess of 3 g/day.

Niacinamide may also be administered parenterally as a component of injectable multivitamin additives contained in parenteral nutrition products. All existing parenteral vitamin products for adults contain 40 mg/vial, which is the dose recommended by the American Medical Association/Nutrition Advisory Group for patients 11 years and older requiring parenteral vitamins.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Niacin Deficiency

Recommended Daily Allowances (RDA):

0 to 6 months: 5 mg orally each day

6 months to 1 year: 6 mg orally each day

1 to 3 years: 9 mg orally each day

4 to 6 years: 12 mg orally each day

7 to 10 years: 13 mg orally each day

Males:

11 to 14 years: 17 mg orally each day

15 to 18 years: 20 mg orally each day

19 to 50 years: 19 mg orally each day

Females:

11 to 50 years: 13 mg orally each day

Niacinamide may also be administered parenterally as a component of injectable multivitamin additives contained in parenteral nutrition products. All existing parenteral vitamin products for children contain 17 mg/vial, which is the dose recommended by the American Medical Association/Nutrition Advisory Group for patients under 11 years of age.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Pemphigus

Recommended Daily Allowances (RDA):

0 to 6 months: 5 mg orally each day

6 months to 1 year: 6 mg orally each day

1 to 3 years: 9 mg orally each day

4 to 6 years: 12 mg orally each day

7 to 10 years: 13 mg orally each day

Males:

11 to 14 years: 17 mg orally each day

15 to 18 years: 20 mg orally each day

19 to 50 years: 19 mg orally each day

Females:

11 to 50 years: 13 mg orally each day

Niacinamide may also be administered parenterally as a component of injectable multivitamin additives contained in parenteral nutrition products. All existing parenteral vitamin products for children contain 17 mg/vial, which is the dose recommended by the American Medical Association/Nutrition Advisory Group for patients under 11 years of age.

Renal Dose Adjustments

Data not available

Liver Dose Adjustments

Because niacinamide is primarily metabolized by the liver and because of the risk of hepatotoxicity, niacinamide in not recommended in patients with liver dysfunction.

Dialysis

Data not available

Other Comments

Taking niacinamide with food may reduce stomach upset.

Niacinamide should not be taken with hot drinks.

Further information

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

More about niacinamide

Consumer resources

Related treatment guides

What other drugs will affect Vitamin B1?

There may be other drugs that can interact with thiamine. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

Vitamin B1 interactions

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Interactions for vitamin B1

Loop Diuretics,

Oral Contraceptives, Stavudine, Tricyclic Antidepressants

Dosage of Vitamin B12 in details

Vitamin B12 Atlantic Laboratories is used as injections SC, IV, IM, intralumbar, and also oral. With anemia associated with vitamin B12 deficiency is introduced on 100-200 mcg in 2 days. In anemia with symptoms of funicular myelosis and megalocytic anemia with diseases of the nervous system - 400-500 micrograms in the first 7 days daily, then 1 time every 5-7 days. In the period of remission in the absence of events funicular myelosis maintenance dose - 100 mcg 2 times a month, in the presence of neurological symptoms - at 200-400 mcg 2-4 times a month. In acute post-hemorrhagic anemia and iron anemia by 30-100 mcg 2-3 times a week. When aplastic anemia (especially in children) - 100 micrograms before clinical improvement. When nutritional anemia in infants and preterm - 30 mcg / day during 15 days.

In diseases of the central and peripheral nervous system and neurological diseases with a pain syndrome is administered in increasing doses - 200-500 mcg, with the improvement in the state - 100 mcg / day. The course of treatment with Vitamin B12 Atlantic Laboratories is 2 weeks. In traumatic lesions of peripheral nervous system - at 200-400 mcg every other day for 40-45 days.

When hepatitis and cirrhosis - 30-60 mcg / day or 100 mg every other day for 25-40 days.

Dystrophy in young children, Down syndrome and cerebral palsy - by 15-30 mcg every other day.

When funicular myelosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis can be introduced into the spinal canal at 15-30 mcg, gradually increasing the dose of 200-250 micrograms.

In radiation sickness, diabetic neuropathy, sprue - by 60-100 mcg daily for 20-30 days.

When deficiency of vitamin B12 to prevent - IV or IM for 1 mg 1 time a month; for treatment - IV or IM for 1 mg daily for 1-2 weeks, the maintenance dose is 1-2 mg IV or IM from 1 per week, up to 1 per month. Duration of treatment is determined individually.

What other drugs will affect Vitamin B12?

Other drugs may interact with cyanocobalamin, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Tell each of your health care providers about all medicines you use now and any medicine you start or stop using.

Vitamin B12 interactions

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In an application of Vitamin B12 Atlantic Laboratories with hormonal contraceptives for oral administration may decrease the concentration of cyanocobalamin in plasma.

In an application with anticonvulsant drugs decreased cyanocobalamin absorption from the gut.

In an Vitamin B12 Atlantic Laboratories application with neomycin, aminosalicylic acid, colchicine, cimetidine, ranitidine, drugs potassium decreased cyanocobalamin absorption from the gut.

Cyanocobalamin may exacerbate allergic reactions caused by thiamine.

When parenteral application of chloramphenicol may decrease the hematopoietic effects of cyanocobalamin with anemia.

What other drugs will affect Vitamin B2?

There may be other drugs that can interact with riboflavin. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

Vitamin B2 interactions

Interactions for vitamin B2

Alcohol - impairs the intestinal absorption of riboflavi

Antidepressants (tricyclics or phenothiazines) - requirements for riboflavin may be increased in patients receiving these medications

Probenecid - concurrent use decreases gastrointestinal absorption of riboflavin; requirements for riboflavin may be increased in patients receiving probenecid.

What other drugs will affect Vitamin B6?

There may be other drugs that can interact with pyridoxine. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

Vitamin B6 interactions

Interactions for vitamin B6

Amiodarone: Concomitant use of vitamin B6 and amiodarone may enhance amiodarone-induced photosensitivity reactions. Doses of vitamin B6 greater than 5-10 milligrams/day should be avoided by those taking amiodarone Carbamazepine: Chronic use of carbamazepine may result in a significant decrease in plasma pyridoxal 5-phosphate levels Cycloserine: Cycloserine may react with pyridoxal 5-phosphate to form a metabolically inactive oxime, which may result in a functional vitamin B6 deficiency Ethionamide: The use of ethionamide may increase vitamin B6 requirements Fosphenytoin: High doses of vitamin B6 may lower plasma levels of phenytoin. Fosphenytoin is a prodrug of phenytoin Hydralazine: The use of hydralazine may increase vitamin B6 requirements Isoniazid: (isonicotinic acid, INH). Isoniazid reacts with pyridoxal 5-phosphate to form a metabolically inactive hydrazone, which may result in functional vitamin B6 deficiency Levodopa: Concomitant use of levodopa and vitamin B6 in doses of 5 milligrams or more daily may reverse the therapeutic effects of levodopa. Vitamin B6 does not reverse the therapeutic effects of levodopa if levodopa is taken concurrently with the levodopa decarboxylase inhibitor carbidopa. Levodopa is typically administered as a combination product with carbidopa

Oral contraceptives: The use of oral contraceptives may increase vitamin B6 requirements. This was more the case with the older oral contraceptive agents with high-dose estrogen/progestin. It appears to be less the case with the newer low-dose estrogen/progestin products Penicillamine: Penicillamine may react with pyridoxal 5-phosphate to form a metabolically inactive thiazolidine, which may result in a functional vitamin B6 deficiency Phenelzine: Phenelzine may react with pyridoxal 5-phosphate to yield a metabolically inactive hydrazone compound Phenobarbital: High doses of vitamin B6 may lower plasma levels of phenobarbital Phenytoin: High doses of vitamin B6 may lower plasma levels of phenytoin Theophylline: Theophylline may react with pyridoxal 5-phosphate leading to low plasma levels of the coenzyme. This may increase the risk of theophylline-induced seizures Valproic acid: Chronic use of valproic acid may result in a significant decrease in plasma pyridoxal 5-phosphate levels.



References

  1. DailyMed. "CALCIUM: DailyMed provides trustworthy information about marketed drugs in the United States. DailyMed is the official provider of FDA label information (package inserts).". https://dailymed.nlm.nih.gov/dailyme... (accessed September 17, 2018).
  2. FDA/SPL Indexing Data. "SY7Q814VUP: The UNique Ingredient Identifier (UNII) is an alphanumeric substance identifier from the joint FDA/USP Substance Registration System (SRS).". https://www.fda.gov/ForIndustry/Data... (accessed September 17, 2018).

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