Calcium/L-lysine/methionine/niacinamide/vitamin B1/vitamin B12/vitamin B2/vitamin B6 Uses

How do you administer this medicine?
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Consists of calcium, L-lysine, methionine, niacinamide, vitamin B1, vitamin B12, vitamin B2, vitamin B6

Calcium indications

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This medication is used to prevent or treat low blood calcium levels in people who do not get enough calcium from their diets. It may be used to treat conditions caused by low calcium levels such as bone loss (osteoporosis), weak bones (osteomalacia/rickets), decreased activity of the parathyroid gland (hypoparathyroidism), and a certain muscle disease (latent tetany). It may also be used in certain patients to make sure they are getting enough calcium (e.g., women who are pregnant, nursing, or postmenopausal, people taking certain medications such as phenytoin, phenobarbital, or prednisone).

Calcium plays a very important role in the body. It is necessary for normal functioning of nerves, cells, muscle, and bone. If there is not enough calcium in the blood, then the body will take calcium from bones, thereby weakening bones. Having the right amount of calcium is important for building and keeping strong bones.

Uses of Calcium in details

This medication is used to prevent or treat low blood calcium levels in people who do not get enough calcium from their diets. It may be used to treat conditions caused by low calcium levels such as bone loss (osteoporosis), weak bones (osteomalacia/rickets), decreased activity of the parathyroid gland (hypoparathyroidism), and a certain muscle disease (latent tetany). It may also be used in certain patients to make sure they are getting enough calcium (e.g., women who are pregnant, nursing, or postmenopausal, people taking certain medications such as phenytoin, phenobarbital, or prednisone).

Calcium plays a very important role in the body. It is necessary for normal functioning of nerves, cells, muscle, and bone. If there is not enough calcium in the blood, then the body will take calcium from bones, thereby weakening bones. Having the right amount of calcium is important for building and keeping strong bones.

How to use Calcium

Take this medication by mouth with food. If your product contains calcium citrate, then it may be taken with or without food. Follow all directions on the product package, or take as directed by your doctor. For best absorption, if your daily dose is more than 600 milligrams, then divide your dose and space it throughout the day. If you are uncertain about any of the information, consult your doctor or pharmacist.

If you are using the chewable product, chew it well before swallowing.

If you are using the effervescent tablet, allow the tablet to fully dissolve in a glass of water before drinking it. Do not chew or swallow the tablet whole.

If you are using the liquid product or powder, measure the medication with a dose-measuring spoon or device to make sure you get the correct dose. Do not use a household spoon. If the liquid product is a suspension, shake the bottle well before each dose.

Use this medication regularly to get the most benefit from it. To help you remember, take it at the same time(s) each day.

If your doctor has recommended that you follow a special diet, it is very important to follow the diet to get the most benefit from this medication and to prevent serious side effects. Do not take other supplements/vitamins unless ordered by your doctor.

If you think you may have a serious medical problem, seek immediate medical attention.

Calcium description

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Calcium chloride is an ionic compound of calcium and chlorine. It is highly soluble in water and it is deliquescent. It is a salt that is solid at room temperature, and it behaves as a typical ionic halide. It has several common applications such as brine for refrigeration plants, ice and dust control on roads, and in cement. It can be produced directly from limestone, but large amounts are also produced as a by-product of the Solvay process. Because of its hygroscopic nature, it must be kept in tightly-sealed containers.

Calcium dosage

Caplet Adult 1 caplet 1-2 times daily. Adolescent & childn >8 yr ½ caplet 1-2 times daily. Susp Childn 1-3 tsp once daily.

Calcium interactions

*Major Interaction Do not take this combination

* Ceftriaxone (Rocephin) interacts with CALCIUM

Administering intravenous ceftriaxone and calcium can result in life-threatening damage to the lungs and kidneys. Calcium should not be administered intravenously within 48 hours of intravenous ceftriaxone.

*Moderate Interaction Be cautious with this combination

* Antibiotics (Quinolone antibiotics) interacts with CALCIUM

Calcium might decrease how much antibiotic your body absorbs. Taking calcium along with some antibiotics might decrease the effectiveness of some antibiotics. To avoid this interaction, take calcium supplements at least 1 hour after antibiotics.

Some of these antibiotics that might interact with calcium include ciprofloxacin (Cipro), enoxacin (Penetrex), norfloxacin (Chibroxin, Noroxin), sparfloxacin (Zagam), and trovafloxacin (Trovan).

* Antibiotics (Tetracycline antibiotics) interacts with CALCIUM

Calcium can attach to some antibiotics called tetracyclines in the stomach. This decreases the amount of tetracyclines that can be absorbed. Taking calcium with tetracyclines might decrease the effectiveness of tetracyclines. To avoid this interaction take calcium 2 hours before or 4 hours after taking tetracyclines.

Some tetracyclines include demeclocycline (Declomycin), minocycline (Minocin), and tetracycline (Achromycin, and others).

* Bisphosphonates interacts with CALCIUM

Calcium can decrease how much bisphosphate your body absorbs. Taking calcium along with bisphosphates can decrease the effectiveness of bisphosphate. To avoid this interaction, take bisphosphonate at least 30 minutes before calcium or later in the day.

Some bisphosphonates include alendronate (Fosamax), etidronate (Didronel), risedronate (Actonel), tiludronate (Skelid), and others.

* Calcipotriene (Dovonex) interacts with CALCIUM

Calcipotriene (Dovonex) is a drug that is similar to vitamin D. Vitamin D helps your body absorb calcium. Taking calcium supplements along with calcipotriene (Dovonex) might cause the body to have too much calcium.

* Digoxin (Lanoxin) interacts with CALCIUM

Calcium can affect your heart. Digoxin (Lanoxin) is used to help your heart beat stronger. Taking calcium along with digoxin (Lanoxin) might increase the effects of digoxin (Lanoxin) and lead to an irregular heartbeat. If you are taking digoxin (Lanoxin), talk to your doctor before taking calcium supplements.

* Diltiazem (Cardizem, Dilacor, Tiazac) interacts with CALCIUM

Calcium can affect your heart. Diltiazem (Cardizem, Dilacor, Tiazac) can also affect your heart. Taking large amounts of calcium along with diltiazem (Cardizem, Dilacor, Tiazac) might decrease the effectiveness of diltiazem (Cardizem, Dilacor, Tiazac).

* Levothyroxine interacts with CALCIUM

Levothyroxine is used for low thyroid function. Calcium can decrease how much levothyroxine your body absorbs. Taking calcium along with levothyroxine might decrease the effectiveness of levothyroxine. Levothyroxine and calcium should be taken at least 4 hours apart.

Some brands that contain levothyroxine include Armour Thyroid, Eltroxin, Estre, Euthyrox, Levo-T, Levothroid, Levoxyl, Synthroid, Unithroid, and others.

* Sotalol (Betapace) interacts with CALCIUM

Taking calcium with sotalol (Betapace) can decrease how much sotalol (Betapace) your body absorbs. Taking calcium along with sotalol (Betapace) might decrease the effectiveness of sotalol (Betapace). To avoid this interaction, take calcium at least 2 hours before or 4 hours after taking sotalol (Betapace).

* Verapamil (Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan) interacts with CALCIUM

Calcium can affect your heart. Verapamil (Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan) can also affect your heart. Do not take large amounts of calcium if you are taking verapamil (Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan).

* Water pills (Thiazide diuretics) interacts with CALCIUM

Some "water pills" increase the amount of calcium in your body. Taking large amounts of calcium with some "water pills" might cause there to be too much calcium in the body. This could cause serious side effects, including kidney problems.

Some of these "water pills" include chlorothiazide (Diuril), hydrochlorothiazide (HydroDIURIL, Esidrix), indapamide (Lozol), metolazone (Zaroxolyn), and chlorthalidone (Hygroton).

*Minor Interaction Be watchful with this combination

* Estrogens interacts with CALCIUM

Estrogen helps your body absorb calcium. Taking estrogen pills along with large amounts of calcium might increase calcium in the body too much.

Estrogen pills include conjugated equine estrogens (Premarin), ethinyl estradiol, estradiol, and others.

* Medications for high blood pressure (Calcium channel blockers) interacts with CALCIUM

Some medications for high blood pressure affect calcium in your body. These medications are called calcium channel blockers. Getting calcium injections might decrease the effectiveness of these medications for high blood pressure.

Some medications for high blood pressure include nifedipine (Adalat, Procardia), verapamil (Calan, Isoptin, Verelan), diltiazem (Cardizem), isradipine (DynaCirc), felodipine (Plendil), amlodipine (Norvasc), and others.

Calcium side effects

See also:
What are the possible side effects of Calcium?

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Adverse reactions can occur with any drug, even over-the-counter medications. Most antacids produce only minor side effects, especially if they are used infrequently. Minor side effects are usually relieved by reducing the dose or frequency. For major reactions, the patient should contact the physician immediately.

Constipation can often be corrected by a high fiber diet. Patients with hormone disorders of the parathyroid glands, those on kidney dialysis or who have any calcium problem should discuss its use with the physician.

For this antacid, the following are the observed side effects:

Minor:

  • constipation

  • nausea

  • unpleasant taste

    Major: (These usually occur only with an overdose of calcium.)

  • loss of appetite

  • mood or mental change

  • vomiting

  • excessive restlessness

  • unusual fatigue or weakness

    Calcium contraindications

    Calcium chloride is contraindicated for cardiac resuscitation in the presence of ventricular fibrillation or in patients with the risk of existing digitalis toxicity.

    L-lysine indications

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    Supplemental L-lysine has putative anti-herpes simplex virus activity. There is preliminary research suggesting that it may have some anti-osteoporotic activity.

    Uses of L-lysine in details

    Herpes simplex infections.

    L-lysine description

    L-Lysine (abbreviated as Lys or K) is an α-amino acid with the chemical formula HO2CCH(NH2)(CH2)4NH2. This amino acid is an essential amino acid, which means that humans cannot synthesize it. Its codons are AAA and AAG. L-Lysine is a base, as are arginine and histidine. The ε-amino group often participates in hydrogen bonding and as a general base in catalysis. Common posttranslational modifications include methylation of the ε-amino group, giving methyl-, dimethyl-, and trimethyllysine. The latter occurs in calmodulin. Other posttranslational modifications include acetylation. Collagen contains hydroxylysine which is derived from lysine by lysyl hydroxylase. O-Glycosylation of lysine residues in the endoplasmic reticulum or Golgi apparatus is used to mark certain proteins for secretion from the cell.

    L-lysine side effects

    Nausea, Abdominal cramp, Diarrhoea

    What is Methionine?

    Racemethionine is used to make the urine more acidic. Making the urine more acidic helps to relieve skin irritation in incontinent (loss of bladder control) adults and diaper rash in infants. methionine also helps to control strong urine odor.

    Racemethionine is available only with your doctor's prescription.

    Once a medicine has been approved for marketing for a certain use, experience may show that it is also useful for other medical problems. Although this use is not included in product labeling, racemethionine may be used to treat acetaminophen poisoning when the preferred medicine for treatment is not available.

    Methionine indications

    It is used to make the urine more acidic. Making the urine more acidic helps to relieve skin irritation in incontinent (loss of bladder control) adults and diaper rash in infants. This medicine also helps to control strong urine odor.

    How should I use Methionine?

    Use methionine as directed by your doctor. Check the label on the medicine for exact dosing instructions.

    • Take methionine with or following a meal.
    • If you have difficulty swallowing the capsules, they may be dissolved in juice, water, or warm milk.
    • If you miss a dose of methionine, take it as soon as possible. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not take 2 doses at once.

    Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use methionine.

    Methionine description

    A sulfur containing essential amino acid that is important in many body functions. It is a chelating agent for heavy metals.

    Methionine interactions

    Acetaminophen and methotrexate - L-methionine may decrease hepatic toxicity in those with acetaminophen overdosage or in those taking methotrexate. Theoretically, it may decrease hepatic toxicity in the case of other potential hepatotoxic drugs, as well. Gentamicin - Methionine may protect against the ototoxic effects of gentamicin.

    Methionine side effects

    See also:
    What are the possible side effects of Methionine?

    Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Side effects that may occur during racemethionine therapy usually do not need medical attention. They may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Check with your doctor if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome:

    More common

    Drowsiness; nausea and vomiting

    Other side effects not listed above may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your doctor.

    Methionine contraindications

    See also:
    What is the most important information I should know about Methionine?

    L-methionine is contraindicated in those with the genetic disorder homocystinuria. It is also contraindicated in those who are hypersensitive to any component of a methionine-containing product.

    What is Niacinamide?

    Treating acne.

    Niacinamide is a vitamin B supplement. Exactly how Niacinamide works is unknown.

    How should I use Niacinamide?

    Use Niacinamide as directed by your doctor. Check the label on the medicine for exact dosing instructions.

    • Wash the affected area with a mild cleanser or other cleansing product prescribed by your doctor and completely dry.
    • Apply a thin layer of the medicine to the affected area twice daily or as directed by your doctor. Gently rub the medicine in until it is evenly distributed.
    • Wash your hands immediately after using Niacinamide.
    • If you miss a dose of Niacinamide, use it as soon as possible. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not use 2 doses at once.

    Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Niacinamide.

    Uses of Niacinamide in details

    To treat Hartnup disease (light sensitive skin rashes), inflammatory skin disease, vitamin deficiency, anxiety and Alzheimer’s disease (disorder that causes mental confusion and forgetfulness). It is also used in combination with intravenous vitamin C therapy for cancer.

    Niacinamide description

    Niacinamide, also called as nicotinamide (vitamin B3), is prescribed for the treatment of niacin deficiency disorders including pellagra. Niacinamide should not be used for treatment of hyperlipidemia.

    Niacinamide dosage

    Niacinamide Dosage

    Applies to the following strengths: 100 mg; 500 mg

    Usual Adult Dose for:

    • Niacin Deficiency
    • Pemphigus

    Usual Pediatric Dose for:

    • Niacin Deficiency
    • Pemphigus

    Additional dosage information:

    • Renal Dose Adjustments
    • Liver Dose Adjustments
    • Dialysis
    • Other Comments

    Usual Adult Dose for Niacin Deficiency

    Recommended Daily Allowances (RDA):

    Males: 19 mg orally each day

    Females: 13 mg orally each day

    Initial dose: 100 mg orally 3 times a day, with or after meals

    Maintenance dose: 100 to 500 mg orally up to 3 times a day, with or after meals

    Niacinamide has toxic potential at adult doses in excess of 3 g/day.

    Niacinamide may also be administered parenterally as a component of injectable multivitamin additives contained in parenteral nutrition products. All existing parenteral vitamin products for adults contain 40 mg/vial, which is the dose recommended by the American Medical Association/Nutrition Advisory Group for patients 11 years and older requiring parenteral vitamins.

    Usual Adult Dose for Pemphigus

    Recommended Daily Allowances (RDA):

    Males: 19 mg orally each day

    Females: 13 mg orally each day

    Initial dose: 100 mg orally 3 times a day, with or after meals

    Maintenance dose: 100 to 500 mg orally up to 3 times a day, with or after meals

    Niacinamide has toxic potential at adult doses in excess of 3 g/day.

    Niacinamide may also be administered parenterally as a component of injectable multivitamin additives contained in parenteral nutrition products. All existing parenteral vitamin products for adults contain 40 mg/vial, which is the dose recommended by the American Medical Association/Nutrition Advisory Group for patients 11 years and older requiring parenteral vitamins.

    Usual Pediatric Dose for Niacin Deficiency

    Recommended Daily Allowances (RDA):

    0 to 6 months: 5 mg orally each day

    6 months to 1 year: 6 mg orally each day

    1 to 3 years: 9 mg orally each day

    4 to 6 years: 12 mg orally each day

    7 to 10 years: 13 mg orally each day

    Males:

    11 to 14 years: 17 mg orally each day

    15 to 18 years: 20 mg orally each day

    19 to 50 years: 19 mg orally each day

    Females:

    11 to 50 years: 13 mg orally each day

    Niacinamide may also be administered parenterally as a component of injectable multivitamin additives contained in parenteral nutrition products. All existing parenteral vitamin products for children contain 17 mg/vial, which is the dose recommended by the American Medical Association/Nutrition Advisory Group for patients under 11 years of age.

    Usual Pediatric Dose for Pemphigus

    Recommended Daily Allowances (RDA):

    0 to 6 months: 5 mg orally each day

    6 months to 1 year: 6 mg orally each day

    1 to 3 years: 9 mg orally each day

    4 to 6 years: 12 mg orally each day

    7 to 10 years: 13 mg orally each day

    Males:

    11 to 14 years: 17 mg orally each day

    15 to 18 years: 20 mg orally each day

    19 to 50 years: 19 mg orally each day

    Females:

    11 to 50 years: 13 mg orally each day

    Niacinamide may also be administered parenterally as a component of injectable multivitamin additives contained in parenteral nutrition products. All existing parenteral vitamin products for children contain 17 mg/vial, which is the dose recommended by the American Medical Association/Nutrition Advisory Group for patients under 11 years of age.

    Renal Dose Adjustments

    Data not available

    Liver Dose Adjustments

    Because niacinamide is primarily metabolized by the liver and because of the risk of hepatotoxicity, niacinamide in not recommended in patients with liver dysfunction.

    Dialysis

    Data not available

    Other Comments

    Taking niacinamide with food may reduce stomach upset.

    Niacinamide should not be taken with hot drinks.

    Further information

    Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

    More about niacinamide

    • Niacinamide Side Effects
    • During Pregnancy
    • Drug Interactions
    • Support Group
    • 1 Review
    • Drug class: vitamins

    Consumer resources

    • Niacinamide
    • Niacinamide Extended-Release Tablets

    Related treatment guides

    • Niacin Deficiency
    • Pemphigus

    Niacinamide side effects

    See also:
    What are the possible side effects of Niacinamide?

    Applies to niacinamide: tablets

    Check with your doctor if any of these most COMMON side effects persist or become bothersome:

    Diarrhea; dizziness; headache; itching; nausea; stomach upset; temporary feeling of warmth or flushing of the skin.

    Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur while taking niacinamide:

    Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); black, tarry, or bloody stools; changes in vision; dark urine; decreased urination; fast or irregular heartbeat; loss of appetite; muscle pain or weakness; numbness or persistent tingling of the skin; persistent nausea, vomiting, or general "unwell" feeling; severe or prolonged flushing of the skin; stomach pain; swelling of the hands, legs, or feet; vomit that looks like coffee grounds; yellowing of the skin or eyes.

    What is the most important information I should know about Niacinamide?

    • Niacinamide is for external use only. Avoid getting Niacinamide in your eyes. If you get Niacinamide in your eyes, rinse thoroughly with cool tap water.
    • Follow up with your doctor after 8 to 12 weeks to monitor your progress.
    • Do not use any other medicines or special cleansers on your skin unless your doctor instructs you otherwise. Makeup and other acne medicines may be applied over Niacinamide as directed by your doctor.
    • PREGNANCY and BREAST-FEEDING: If you become pregnant, contact your doctor. You will need to discuss the benefits and risks of using Niacinamide while you are pregnant. It is not known if Niacinamide is found in breast milk after topical use. If you are or will be breast-feeding while you use Niacinamide, check with your doctor. Discuss any possible risks to your baby.

    What is Vitamin B1?

    Thiamine is vitamin B1. Thiamine is found in foods such as cereals, whole grains, meat, nuts, beans, and peas. Thiamine is important in the breakdown of carbohydrates from foods into products needed by the body.

    Thiamine is used to treat or prevent vitamin B1 deficiency. Thiamine injection is used to treat beriberi, a serious condition caused by prolonged lack of vitamin B1.

    Thiamine taken by mouth (oral) is available without a prescription. Injectable thiamine must be given by a healthcare professional.

    Thiamine may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

    Vitamin B1 indications

    Vitamin B1 deficiency

    Vitamin B1 description

    3-((4-Amino-2-methyl-5-pyrimidinyl)methyl)-5-(2- hydroxyethyl)-4-methylthiazolium chloride.

    Vitamin B1 interactions

    Interactions for vitamin B1

    Loop Diuretics,

    Oral Contraceptives, Stavudine, Tricyclic Antidepressants

    Vitamin B1 side effects

    Applies to thiamine: capsule, solution, tablet, tablet enteric coated

    As well as its needed effects, thiamine (the active ingredient contained in Vitamin B1) may cause unwanted side effects that require medical attention.

    Major Side Effects

    If any of the following side effects occur while taking thiamine, check with your doctor immediately:

    Rare - Soon after receiving injection only

    • Coughing
    • difficulty in swallowing
    • hives
    • itching of skin
    • swelling of face, lips, or eyelids
    • wheezing or difficulty in breathing

    Vitamin B1 contraindications

    Contraindications for vitamin B1

    Hypersensitivity to vitamin B1 or any component of a product containing vitamin B1.

    What is Vitamin B12?

    Cyanocobalamin is a man-made form of vitamin B12. Vitamin B12 is important for growth, cell reproduction, blood formation, and protein and tissue synthesis.

    Cyanocobalamin is used to treat vitamin B12 deficiency in people with pernicious anemia and other conditions.

    Cyanocobalamin may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

    Vitamin B12 indications

    Pernicious anemia, both uncomplicated and accompanied by nervous system involvement.

    Dietary deficiency of Vitamin B12, occurring in strict vegetarians and in their breast-fed infants. (Isolated vitamin B12 deficiency is very rare).

    Malabsorption of vitamin B12, resulting from structural or functional damage to the stomach, where intrinsic factor is secreted or to the ileum, where intrinsic factor facilitates vitamin B12 absorption. These conditions include tropical sprue, and nontropical sprue (idiopathic steatorrhea, gluten-induced enteropathy). Folate deficiency in these patients is usually more severe than vitamin B12 deficiency.

    Inadequate secretion of intrinsic factor, resulting from lesions that destroy the gastric mucosa (ingestion of corrosives, extensive neoplasia), and a number of conditions associated with a variable degree of gastric atrophy (such as multiple sclerosis, certain endocrine disorders, iron deficiency, and subtotal gastrectomy). Total gastrectomy always produces vitamin B12 deficiency.

    Structural lesions leading to vitamin B12 deficiency include regional ileitis, ileal resections, malignancies, etc.

    Competition for Vitamin B12 by intestinal parasites or bacteria.

    The fish tapeworm (Diphyilobothrium latum) absorbs huge quantities of vitamin B12 and infested patients often have associated gastric atrophy. The blind-loop syndrome may produce deficiency of Vitamin B12 or folate.

    Inadequate utilization of vitamin B12. This may occur if antimetabolites for the vitamin are employed in the treatment of neoplasia.

    For the Schilling Test.

    Vitamin B12 description

    Vitamin B12 (commonly known as Vitamin B12) is the most chemically complex of all the vitamins. Vitamin B12's structure is based on a corrin ring, which, although similar to the porphyrin ring found in heme, chlorophyll, and cytochrome, has two of the pyrrole rings directly bonded. The central metal ion is Co (cobalt). Vitamin B12 cannot be made by plants or by animals, as the only type of organisms that have the enzymes required for the synthesis of cyanocobalamin are bacteria and archaea. Higher plants do not concentrate cyanocobalamin from the soil and so are a poor source of the substance as compared with animal tissues. Vitamin B12 is naturally found in foods including meat (especially liver and shellfish), eggs, and milk products.

    Vitamin B12 dosage

    Vitamin B12 is used as injections SC, IV, IM, intralumbar, and also oral. With anemia associated with vitamin B12 deficiency is introduced on 100-200 mcg in 2 days. In anemia with symptoms of funicular myelosis and megalocytic anemia with diseases of the nervous system - 400-500 micrograms in the first 7 days daily, then 1 time every 5-7 days. In the period of remission in the absence of events funicular myelosis maintenance dose - 100 mcg 2 times a month, in the presence of neurological symptoms - at 200-400 mcg 2-4 times a month. In acute post-hemorrhagic anemia and iron anemia by 30-100 mcg 2-3 times a week. When aplastic anemia (especially in children) - 100 micrograms before clinical improvement. When nutritional anemia in infants and preterm - 30 mcg / day during 15 days.

    In diseases of the central and peripheral nervous system and neurological diseases with a pain syndrome is administered in increasing doses - 200-500 mcg, with the improvement in the state - 100 mcg / day. The course of treatment with Vitamin B12 is 2 weeks. In traumatic lesions of peripheral nervous system - at 200-400 mcg every other day for 40-45 days.

    When hepatitis and cirrhosis - 30-60 mcg / day or 100 mg every other day for 25-40 days.

    Dystrophy in young children, Down syndrome and cerebral palsy - by 15-30 mcg every other day.

    When funicular myelosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis can be introduced into the spinal canal at 15-30 mcg, gradually increasing the dose of 200-250 micrograms.

    In radiation sickness, diabetic neuropathy, sprue - by 60-100 mcg daily for 20-30 days.

    When deficiency of vitamin B12 to prevent - IV or IM for 1 mg 1 time a month; for treatment - IV or IM for 1 mg daily for 1-2 weeks, the maintenance dose is 1-2 mg IV or IM from 1 per week, up to 1 per month. Duration of treatment is determined individually.

    Vitamin B12 interactions

    In an application of Vitamin B12 Atlantic Laboratories with hormonal contraceptives for oral administration may decrease the concentration of cyanocobalamin in plasma.

    In an application with anticonvulsant drugs decreased cyanocobalamin absorption from the gut.

    In an Vitamin B12 Atlantic Laboratories application with neomycin, aminosalicylic acid, colchicine, cimetidine, ranitidine, drugs potassium decreased cyanocobalamin absorption from the gut.

    Cyanocobalamin may exacerbate allergic reactions caused by thiamine.

    When parenteral application of chloramphenicol may decrease the hematopoietic effects of cyanocobalamin with anemia.

    Vitamin B12 side effects

    See also:
    What are the possible side effects of Vitamin B12?

    Applies to cyanocobalamin: intramuscular solution

    Other dosage forms:

    • nasal gel/jelly, nasal spray

    As well as its needed effects, cyanocobalamin (the active ingredient contained in Vitamin B12) may cause unwanted side effects that require medical attention.

    If any of the following side effects occur while taking cyanocobalamin, check with your doctor or nurse immediately:

    Incidence not known:

    • Abdominal or stomach pain
    • bleeding from the gums or nose
    • blue lips and fingernails
    • chest pain
    • cough
    • coughing that sometimes produces a pink frothy sputum
    • decreased urine output
    • difficult, fast, noisy breathing, sometimes with wheezing
    • difficulty with swallowing
    • dilated neck veins
    • dizziness
    • extreme fatigue
    • eye pain
    • fast heartbeat
    • headache
    • hives, itching, or skin rash
    • increased sweating
    • irregular breathing
    • irregular heartbeat
    • pale skin
    • puffiness or swelling of the eyelids or around the eyes, face, lips, or tongue
    • ringing in the ears
    • swelling of the face, fingers, feet, or lower legs
    • tightness in the chest
    • unusual tiredness or weakness
    • weight gain

    Minor Side Effects

    Some cyanocobalamin side effects may not need any medical attention. As your body gets used to the medicine these side effects may disappear. Your health care professional may be able to help you prevent or reduce these side effects, but do check with them if any of the following side effects continue, or if you are concerned about them:

    Incidence not known:

    • Diarrhea
    • skin rash with a general disease

    Vitamin B12 contraindications

    Hypersensitivity to the components of the formula. History of allergy to the cobalamins (vitamin B12 and similar substances). Malignant tumors. By stimulating the growth of tissues, the Cobamamide could increase the high rate of cell multiplication. Sensitivity to cobalt. History of allergies to cobalamin (vitamin B12 and related substances).

    - Malignant tumor: Due to the action of vitamin B12 on the growth of tissue cell multiplication rate high, the risk of exacerbation should be taken into account.

    - Children under 6 years because of the dosage form

    What is Vitamin B2?

    Riboflavin is vitamin B2. Vitamins are naturally occurring substances necessary for many processes in the body. Riboflavin is important in the maintenance of many tissues of the body.

    Riboflavin is used to prevent and to treat deficiencies of riboflavin.

    Riboflavin may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

    Vitamin B2 indications

    vitamin b2 deficiency

    Uses of Vitamin B2 in details

    Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) supplementation is used to prevent and treat riboflavin deficiency. Vitamin B2 may prevent migraine headaches at high doses and be useful for prevention of eye conditions such as cataract, glaucoma and tired eyes (fatigue). Vitamin B2 is also used for boosting of immune system, and maintenance of healthy hair, skin, nails and mucous membranes.

    Vitamin B2 description

    Nutritional factor found in milk, eggs, malted barley, liver, kidney, heart, and leafy vegetables. The richest natural source is yeast. It occurs in the free form only in the retina of the eye, in whey, and in urine; its principal forms in tissues and cells are as flavin mononucleotide and flavin-adenine dinucleotide.

    Vitamin B2 interactions

    Interactions for vitamin B2

    Alcohol - impairs the intestinal absorption of riboflavi

    Antidepressants (tricyclics or phenothiazines) - requirements for riboflavin may be increased in patients receiving these medications

    Probenecid - concurrent use decreases gastrointestinal absorption of riboflavin; requirements for riboflavin may be increased in patients receiving probenecid.

    Vitamin B2 side effects

    Genitourinary

    Yellow-orange discoloration of urine.

    Vitamin B2 contraindications

    None well documented.

    What is Vitamin B6?

    Pyridoxine is vitamin B6. Vitamins occur naturally in foods such as meat, poultry, nuts, whole grains, bananas, and avocados. Vitamin B6 is important for many processes in the body.

    Pyridoxine is used to treat or prevent vitamin B6 deficiency. It is also used to treat a certain type of anemia (lack of red blood cells). Pyridoxine injection is also used to treat some types of seizure in babies.

    Pyridoxine taken by mouth (oral) is available without a prescription. Injectable pyridoxine must be given by a healthcare professional.

    Pyridoxine may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

    Vitamin B6 indications

    * Sideroblastic anaemia

    * Treatment and prophylaxis of vitamin B6 deficiency states

    How should I use Vitamin B6?

    Follow all directions on your prescription label. Do not use this medicine in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

    Pyridoxine tablets are taken by mouth. Injectable pyridoxine is injected into a muscle or into a vein through an IV. You may be shown how to use injections at home. Do not self-inject this medicine if you do not understand how to give the injection and properly dispose of used needles, IV tubing, and other items used to inject the medicine.

    The recommended dietary allowance of pyridoxine increases with age. Follow your healthcare provider's instructions. You may also consult the Office of Dietary Supplements of the National Institutes of Health, or the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Nutrient Database (formerly "Recommended Daily Allowances") listings for more information.

    Pyridoxine is only part of a complete program of treatment that may also include a special diet. It is very important to follow the diet plan created for you by your doctor or nutrition counselor. You should become very familiar with the list of foods you should eat or avoid to help control your condition.

    Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

    Uses of Vitamin B6 in details

    It is used for the treatment and prevention of vitamin B6 deficiency. It is important for the breakdown of protein, fats, and carbohydrates from foods.

    Vitamin B6 description

    The 4-methanol form of vitamin B 6 which is converted to pyridoxal phosphate which is a coenzyme for synthesis of amino acids, neurotransmitters (serotonin, norepinephrine), sphingolipids, aminolevulinic acid. Although pyridoxine and Vitamin B 6 are still frequently used as synonyms, especially by medical researchers, this practice is erroneous and sometimes misleading (EE Snell; Ann NY Acad Sci, vol 585 pg 1, 1990).

    Vitamin B6 interactions

    Interactions for vitamin B6

    Amiodarone: Concomitant use of vitamin B6 and amiodarone may enhance amiodarone-induced photosensitivity reactions. Doses of vitamin B6 greater than 5-10 milligrams/day should be avoided by those taking amiodarone Carbamazepine: Chronic use of carbamazepine may result in a significant decrease in plasma pyridoxal 5-phosphate levels Cycloserine: Cycloserine may react with pyridoxal 5-phosphate to form a metabolically inactive oxime, which may result in a functional vitamin B6 deficiency Ethionamide: The use of ethionamide may increase vitamin B6 requirements Fosphenytoin: High doses of vitamin B6 may lower plasma levels of phenytoin. Fosphenytoin is a prodrug of phenytoin Hydralazine: The use of hydralazine may increase vitamin B6 requirements Isoniazid: (isonicotinic acid, INH). Isoniazid reacts with pyridoxal 5-phosphate to form a metabolically inactive hydrazone, which may result in functional vitamin B6 deficiency Levodopa: Concomitant use of levodopa and vitamin B6 in doses of 5 milligrams or more daily may reverse the therapeutic effects of levodopa. Vitamin B6 does not reverse the therapeutic effects of levodopa if levodopa is taken concurrently with the levodopa decarboxylase inhibitor carbidopa. Levodopa is typically administered as a combination product with carbidopa

    Oral contraceptives: The use of oral contraceptives may increase vitamin B6 requirements. This was more the case with the older oral contraceptive agents with high-dose estrogen/progestin. It appears to be less the case with the newer low-dose estrogen/progestin products Penicillamine: Penicillamine may react with pyridoxal 5-phosphate to form a metabolically inactive thiazolidine, which may result in a functional vitamin B6 deficiency Phenelzine: Phenelzine may react with pyridoxal 5-phosphate to yield a metabolically inactive hydrazone compound Phenobarbital: High doses of vitamin B6 may lower plasma levels of phenobarbital Phenytoin: High doses of vitamin B6 may lower plasma levels of phenytoin Theophylline: Theophylline may react with pyridoxal 5-phosphate leading to low plasma levels of the coenzyme. This may increase the risk of theophylline-induced seizures Valproic acid: Chronic use of valproic acid may result in a significant decrease in plasma pyridoxal 5-phosphate levels.

    Vitamin B6 side effects

    Applies to pyridoxine: capsule, injectable, solution, tablet, tablet enteric coated, tablet extended release

    As well as its needed effects, pyridoxine (the active ingredient contained in Vitamin B6) may cause unwanted side effects that require medical attention.

    Severity: Moderate

    If any of the following side effects occur while taking pyridoxine, check with your doctor or nurse as soon as possible:

    With large doses

    • Clumsiness
    • numbness of hands or feet

    Vitamin B6 contraindications

    Contraindications for vitamin B6

    Vitamin B6 is contraindicated in those hypersensitive to any component of a vitamin B6-containing product.

    Active ingredient matches for Calcium/L-lysine/methionine/niacinamide/vitamin B1/vitamin B12/vitamin B2/vitamin B6:

    Calcium/L-lysine/methionine/niacinamide/vitamin B1/vitamin B12/vitamin B2/vitamin B6


    References

    1. DailyMed. "CALCIUM: DailyMed provides trustworthy information about marketed drugs in the United States. DailyMed is the official provider of FDA label information (package inserts).". https://dailymed.nlm.nih.gov/dailyme... (accessed September 17, 2018).
    2. PubChem. "L-lysine". https://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/com... (accessed September 17, 2018).
    3. PubChem. "Calcium". https://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/com... (accessed September 17, 2018).

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